Author Topic: "Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds  (Read 3642 times)

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Offline AuntieEm2

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« on: December 05, 2007, 04:47:26 PM »
Were any of you sent from a program to one of what I have heard referred to as "finishing schools"? Post-program programs for 18-24 year olds.

What were the circumstances and how long was your stay? Same highly isolated environment?

This from Innercept in Idaho:
Quote
We have been involved with North Idaho Behavioral Health (NIBH) over the past ten years. In that time, we have seen many students who are ready to leave the highly structured environment at NIBH, yet are at risk of having the progress they worked so hard to gain jeopardized by a return to a larger campus setting.

Innercept is run by Dr. George Ullrich (sorry if any of you just lost your lunch).

Auntie Em
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Ursus

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2007, 05:13:31 PM »
At Hyde there is great pressure put on kids to return for the "post-graduate" year.  Actually, it has been decades since it was called that.  Hyde came up with a very slick way of restructuring the grades to ensure a higher yield of returning students.

What would ordinarily be called your Senior year, is now called "Senior Prep."  If your character development has been outstanding, you might be lucky enough to become a full-fledged Senior partway through the year.  More often than not, you will not, and at the end of that year you will be given the choice of graduating with a "certificate" (somewhat analogous to a GED), or returning for an extra year in the hopes that you will make it to Senior Leadership, and possibly be able to earn a Hyde diploma by year's end.

I believe Junior year is now also stratified like that, although less distinctly.  There is a term they use for those ready to become Senior Preps but it escapes me at the moment.

As if that were not bad enough, there have been cases of students held back a year before even getting to that point, by virtue of their grades being artificially depressed via the character component.  One gets graded on both academics and character development, and of the two, the latter is more important.  Moreover, even though these two grades are supposed to be judged separately, they aren't really.  If you're a kid who is deemed to totally suck in the character department, guess what, you can kiss an "A" in anything goodbye, even if you are the world's next Einstein and had to teach the class half the time (because the teacher didn't exactly know the material).

It is certainly feasible that a kid could do six years there going through the Freshman-Sophomore-Junior-Senior years, although it is more likely to be five.  I did know a 20 yo student in my Senior Prep class, however, who was still at that level by virtue of Hyde's system, and I don't think he ever made it to the diploma stage.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Anonymous

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2007, 06:10:44 PM »
yup.
after leaving my program after junior year, i went to a boarding school for my last year of high school. i promptly got kicked out halfway through the year for getting into hard drugs. i cleaned up real quick (somehow..i dont know how...but kicking oxy&coke was easier than quitting weed), and finished my senior year at a school called "the smith school" in manhattan. it's a finishing school, and a third/fourth/xth chance school.
Bassically, it's a small, almost ordinary day school for kids who got kicked out of every other school they went to, and have no chance of finishing high school. It was a small school, with a student body of around 50, and a grad class of eight. the school had alot of ex-gangmembers, dealers, prostitutes, porforming arts kids, and spoiled rich kids - i was a spoiled rich kid. it was a good mix of affluent kids and ghetto kids. it cost 5g/semester, but they would also take ghetto kids practically for free if they showed that they were very serious about finishing high school.

The rules were simple - you can do whatever the hell you want outside of school, as long as you were able to maintain passing grades. they kept a blind eye. as long as you got your shit done, they forgave your tresspasses.

The from the kids that graduated, a majority went on to lead fairly normal lives. the one thing that i noticed though is that a few of the people still kept one foot in the gutter, one on the sidewalk. they continued on to college, got good jobs, but they kept their illicit connections. They still did drugs....they were just more functional. a few kids always made huge improvements every grad class, and a few slid back into bad habbits. There's one girl i know from my class that failed out of community college and is now working with/sleeping around with one of the biggest coke delivery networks in the city. another girl went on to transfer into an Ivy league, and graduated with a 3.9.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2007, 06:33:54 PM »
What's your point?
(It just never gets old.)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2007, 07:09:04 PM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
yup.
after leaving my program after junior year, i went to a boarding school for my last year of high school. i promptly got kicked out halfway through the year for getting into hard drugs. i cleaned up real quick (somehow..i dont know how...but kicking oxy&coke was easier than quitting weed), and finished my senior year at a school called "the smith school" in manhattan. it's a finishing school, and a third/fourth/xth chance school.
Bassically, it's a small, almost ordinary day school for kids who got kicked out of every other school they went to, and have no chance of finishing high school. It was a small school, with a student body of around 50, and a grad class of eight. the school had alot of ex-gangmembers, dealers, prostitutes, porforming arts kids, and spoiled rich kids - i was a spoiled rich kid. it was a good mix of affluent kids and ghetto kids. it cost 5g/semester, but they would also take ghetto kids practically for free if they showed that they were very serious about finishing high school.

The rules were simple - you can do whatever the hell you want outside of school, as long as you were able to maintain passing grades. they kept a blind eye. as long as you got your shit done, they forgave your tresspasses.

The from the kids that graduated, a majority went on to lead fairly normal lives. the one thing that i noticed though is that a few of the people still kept one foot in the gutter, one on the sidewalk. they continued on to college, got good jobs, but they kept their illicit connections. They still did drugs....they were just more functional. a few kids always made huge improvements every grad class, and a few slid back into bad habbits. There's one girl i know from my class that failed out of community college and is now working with/sleeping around with one of the biggest coke delivery networks in the city. another girl went on to transfer into an Ivy league, and graduated with a 3.9.


It's always weird to hear someone refer to themselves as a spoiled rich kid. Sorta like hearing someone refer to themselves as drugie or promiscuous.

The finishing schools that are related to the tt industry are really places for parents to dump their adult kids. They advertise themselves as teaching “life skillsâ€
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Offline dishdutyfugitive

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2007, 07:31:59 PM »
Should parents have to have a license to have children. ??? I often wonder ...

Most folks think that they are entitled to the following:

a good job

marriage

a house

2.2 kids.

Unfortunately, there's no disaster planning for the fact that 50% of marriages end up in divorce.

A percentage (let's say 15%) of the remaining 50% may be married but are unfit parents.

Where does that leave a good number of kids who grew up in these broken and dysfunctional homes? Slightly buggered I'd say.

Well don't worry we can just outsource the parenting and send em to finishing school!!!!  And why do we do that? So they can graduate, grow up and rinse/lather/repeat the process.

Do you know what the odds are of meeting your 'life partner' between the age of 25-35?  

8%

( Assuming the average person lives to be 80 )

Yet everyone frantically scrambles to beat these odds.

Yes, I know I sound jaded. These are my thoughts after reviewing the numbers. I'm as guilty as the next guy for wanting all those experiences/things mentioned above.

I'm just calling a spade a spade and wondering if anyone else has pondered this.
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Offline Froderik

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2007, 07:36:52 PM »
Yes; please pray for my children.
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Offline Anonymous

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2007, 07:41:35 PM »
Will "prey on" suffice?
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Offline Froderik

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2007, 07:44:19 PM »
Way to 'prey' on my worst fears, there Lon.. :lol: ::puke::
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Offline Oz girl

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2007, 05:24:04 AM »
Quote from: ""Ursus""

What would ordinarily be called your Senior year, is now called "Senior Prep."  If your character development has been outstanding, you might be lucky enough to become a full-fledged Senior partway through the year.  More often than not, you will not, and at the end of that year you will be given the choice of graduating with a "certificate" (somewhat analogous to a GED), or returning for an extra year in the hopes that you will make it to Senior Leadership, and possibly be able to earn a Hyde diploma by year's end.


It is certainly feasible that a kid could do six years there going through the Freshman-Sophomore-Junior-Senior years, although it is more likely to be five.  I did know a 20 yo student in my Senior Prep class, however, who was still at that level by virtue of Hyde's system, and I don't think he ever made it to the diploma stage.


So can a kid doing this senior Prep thing still sit the SATs? I know this used to happen in year 11 but I remember kids viewing it as really important to get into university. Do they also let these snr Prep kids apply to univeristy the way their peers at other schools do? Or is this also dependent on this whole "character" issue?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Ursus

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2007, 09:44:24 AM »
Quote from: ""Oz girl""
Quote from: ""Ursus""
What would ordinarily be called your Senior year, is now called "Senior Prep."  If your character development has been outstanding, you might be lucky enough to become a full-fledged Senior partway through the year.  More often than not, you will not, and at the end of that year you will be given the choice of graduating with a "certificate" (somewhat analogous to a GED), or returning for an extra year in the hopes that you will make it to Senior Leadership, and possibly be able to earn a Hyde diploma by year's end.

It is certainly feasible that a kid could do six years there going through the Freshman-Sophomore-Junior-Senior years, although it is more likely to be five.  I did know a 20 yo student in my Senior Prep class, however, who was still at that level by virtue of Hyde's system, and I don't think he ever made it to the diploma stage.
So can a kid doing this senior Prep thing still sit the SATs? I know this used to happen in year 11 but I remember kids viewing it as really important to get into university. Do they also let these snr Prep kids apply to univeristy the way their peers at other schools do? Or is this also dependent on this whole "character" issue?

I don't think they would try to physically stand in the way of a kid taking their SATs.  Certain it is that some are more groomed and encouraged than others, and that would generally not be based on their academic standing.  In fact, I'd be more prone to say that in most cases it was antithetical to their academic standing, since usually Hyde considers someone who enjoys academic striving to be lacking in character.  But I think there is a certain amount of "shame" attached, for lack of a better word, to someone who is attempting to get the "worldly credentials" for college entry when Hyde deems they are "not ready" to graduate.

Just how much influence a parent's ability to finance an additional year might have on that readiness, I shall leave to the reader's imagination.

Mind you, beyond all the baloney of stratifying one's last "two years" in high school, kids at Hyde also have to run the gauntlet of the Senior Leadership vote.  Those deemed sufficiently superior in their Senior year (not Senior Prep) get to be in the even more elite squadron of moral superiors considered responsible enough to pass judgment on everyone else.  This goes way beyond mundane dorm squabbles or routine doling out of "consequences."  These kids vote on whether a kid will be able to get a diploma or a certificate, perhaps even graduate, for that matter.  And their votes count.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Ursus

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2007, 10:44:11 AM »
Some snippets from the home folder regarding the aforementioned vote:

What I remember is a vote among seniors and faculty on whether each of us would be graduating with a diploma or with a certificate and the option of coming back for another try at the diploma. It is with great pride that I am able to say that I received an overwhelming vote of no confidence. I took the certificate, which sufficed for college matriculation, and booked. I knew intuitively that Hyde was all wrong, just as I know it intellectually now.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288118#288118

Despite the fact that the senior class voted overwhelmingly against graduating me, despite the fact that the faculty voted overwhelmingly against my graduating, despite the fact that Ed voted against graduating me, despite how I called a "leadership" year a waste of time, I got a nice college recommendation from Ed. For that I am grateful.

Do you remember the senior graduation vote? Did you notice that in most cases eyes went around the room before hands went up? There can be no doubt that the results would have been quite different had it not been a public vote. It said a lot about our craven selves. But Ed gave me a good recommendation regardless. He disobeyed! That disobedience is his redeeming feature.

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=282680#282680

I think a lot gets made out of that process being a vote. The thing you have to ask your self: how hard is that to fix? How hard do you think it was for Joe and Ed to dial the number of graduates? A few special talks. A straw list. These guys are/were masters with adults. They were manipulating brain washed kids.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288139#288139

The vote was rigged in two ways I noticed at the time of voting. First, Joe or Ed commented on each kid. I can't remember anymore whether these comments preceded or followed the vote. In the former case, it would have vitiated the vote. In the latter case, there may have been other cues to vote one way or the other. Second, it was a public vote; a secret ballot would have made it harder for us to base our vote on how others and in particular the leadership were voting. In short, a dictatorial vote, with a bogus appearance of democracy.

Courage, integrity, leadership, curiosity, and concern!

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288236#288236

To elaborate on the second point, there was common knowledge. That is, I know that Joe votes against Sally. Joe knows that I know that Joe votes against Sally. I know that Joe knows that I know that Joe knows that Joe votes against Sally. Joe knows that I know that, and so on ad infinitum. Joe votes on me next. I better vote against Sally too.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288251#288251

Common knowledge and a credible threat of punishment for deviation. Conformity guaranteed. The same setup was applied to all aspects of Hyde life.

Courage, integrity, leadership, curiosity, concern!

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288252#288252

I never had any allusions that my character was growing. Some one shared with me the senior vote process and how they we voted off the island. This is some beside Mike. How fucked is that? I mean really? I don't have the time to describe the hypocrisies that went on in that room. Two weeks later I was smoking dope in a house in Waterville with half the guys in that room that were passing judgment on character. And one of those fuckers stole my brother's army field jacket that he wore in the Cambodia invasion with the 7/17 cav. Character my ass.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=282796#282796
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Anonymous

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2007, 04:12:19 PM »
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Some snippets from the home folder regarding the aforementioned vote:

What I remember is a vote among seniors and faculty on whether each of us would be graduating with a diploma or with a certificate and the option of coming back for another try at the diploma. It is with great pride that I am able to say that I received an overwhelming vote of no confidence. I took the certificate, which sufficed for college matriculation, and booked. I knew intuitively that Hyde was all wrong, just as I know it intellectually now.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288118#288118

Despite the fact that the senior class voted overwhelmingly against graduating me, despite the fact that the faculty voted overwhelmingly against my graduating, despite the fact that Ed voted against graduating me, despite how I called a "leadership" year a waste of time, I got a nice college recommendation from Ed. For that I am grateful.

Do you remember the senior graduation vote? Did you notice that in most cases eyes went around the room before hands went up? There can be no doubt that the results would have been quite different had it not been a public vote. It said a lot about our craven selves. But Ed gave me a good recommendation regardless. He disobeyed! That disobedience is his redeeming feature.

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=282680#282680

I think a lot gets made out of that process being a vote. The thing you have to ask your self: how hard is that to fix? How hard do you think it was for Joe and Ed to dial the number of graduates? A few special talks. A straw list. These guys are/were masters with adults. They were manipulating brain washed kids.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288139#288139

The vote was rigged in two ways I noticed at the time of voting. First, Joe or Ed commented on each kid. I can't remember anymore whether these comments preceded or followed the vote. In the former case, it would have vitiated the vote. In the latter case, there may have been other cues to vote one way or the other. Second, it was a public vote; a secret ballot would have made it harder for us to base our vote on how others and in particular the leadership were voting. In short, a dictatorial vote, with a bogus appearance of democracy.

Courage, integrity, leadership, curiosity, and concern!

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288236#288236

To elaborate on the second point, there was common knowledge. That is, I know that Joe votes against Sally. Joe knows that I know that Joe votes against Sally. I know that Joe knows that I know that Joe knows that Joe votes against Sally. Joe knows that I know that, and so on ad infinitum. Joe votes on me next. I better vote against Sally too.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288251#288251

Common knowledge and a credible threat of punishment for deviation. Conformity guaranteed. The same setup was applied to all aspects of Hyde life.

Courage, integrity, leadership, curiosity, concern!

http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=288252#288252

I never had any allusions that my character was growing. Some one shared with me the senior vote process and how they we voted off the island. This is some beside Mike. How fucked is that? I mean really? I don't have the time to describe the hypocrisies that went on in that room. Two weeks later I was smoking dope in a house in Waterville with half the guys in that room that were passing judgment on character. And one of those fuckers stole my brother's army field jacket that he wore in the Cambodia invasion with the 7/17 cav. Character my ass.
http://wwf.fornits.com/viewtopic.php?p=282796#282796


have you ever heard of the john dewey school? It sounds alot like hyde. All the students "vote" on wether to accept you......weird
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Offline Ursus

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2007, 05:27:22 PM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
have you ever heard of the john dewey school? It sounds alot like hyde. All the students "vote" on wether to accept you......weird

I believe there is a John Dewey High School in Brooklyn (NY), considered to be a relatively progressive public high school, but you are probably thinking of John Dewey Academy in Massachusetts:  
http://www.jda.org/
« Last Edit: December 06, 2007, 08:20:51 PM by Guest »
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Offline AuntieEm2

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"Finishing schools" for 18-24 year olds
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2007, 05:38:50 PM »
The other students decide if you graduate or get a certificate? "Character" features prominently in the decision to grant or withhold a diploma?

Madness, utter madness.

Auntie Em
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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