Author Topic: Abuse Hotlines for Programs  (Read 1268 times)

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Offline Anne Bonney

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2010, 02:03:31 PM »
Quote from: "Whooter"
 The kids can easily tell their parents or run away to a local store to call someone.

Sure, they can try, but they don't because they know the punishments they'll receive if they dare to question or complain aren't worth it.  I watched someone who did try to tell their parents they were being abused and the parents reported it to staff and that kid was in the 'time-out room' for 3 weeks, being beaten and starved the whole time.  We learned very quickly to keep our mouths shut.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
traight, St. Pete, early 80s
AA is a cult http://www.orange-papers.org/orange-cult.html

The more boring a child is, the more the parents, when showing off the child, receive adulation for being good parents-- because they have a tame child-creature in their house.  ~~  Frank Zappa

Offline Whooter

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2010, 02:16:53 PM »
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"
Quote from: "Whooter"
 The kids can easily tell their parents or run away to a local store to call someone.

Sure, they can try, but they don't because they know the punishments they'll receive if they dare to question or complain aren't worth it.  I watched someone who did try to tell their parents they were being abused and the parents reported it to staff and that kid was in the 'time-out room' for 3 weeks, being beaten and starved the whole time.  We learned very quickly to keep our mouths shut.

Thats awful, Anne,  I am glad the placed closed down.  My daughter ran away after a few months and they talked her back to campus.  I was notified and allowed to speak with her and she explained why she ran away.
She was told (and I was told) that if she ran away again then she would not be able to complete the program and would be sent home.  So at ASR, Anyway, there is no abuse like that and they are a little bit more understanding of the children.



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« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anne Bonney

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2010, 02:19:57 PM »
Quote from: "Whooter"

Thats awful, Anne,  I am glad the placed closed down.  My daughter ran away after a few months and they talked her back to campus.  I was notified and allowed to speak with her and she explained why she ran away.
She was told (and I was told) that if she ran away again then she would not be able to complete the program and would be sent home.  So at ASR, Anyway, there is no abuse like that and they are a little bit more understanding of the children.

And you would have just welcomed her home?  From what I've read both here and other sites, ASR uses the "exit plan" (either the kid stays or they're kicked out of their home) to get the kids to stay, which isn't really a choice.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
traight, St. Pete, early 80s
AA is a cult http://www.orange-papers.org/orange-cult.html

The more boring a child is, the more the parents, when showing off the child, receive adulation for being good parents-- because they have a tame child-creature in their house.  ~~  Frank Zappa

Offline Whooter

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #18 on: September 30, 2010, 02:29:40 PM »
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"
Quote from: "Whooter"

Thats awful, Anne,  I am glad the placed closed down.  My daughter ran away after a few months and they talked her back to campus.  I was notified and allowed to speak with her and she explained why she ran away.
She was told (and I was told) that if she ran away again then she would not be able to complete the program and would be sent home.  So at ASR, Anyway, there is no abuse like that and they are a little bit more understanding of the children.

And you would have just welcomed her home?  From what I've read both here and other sites, ASR uses the "exit plan" (either the kid stays or they're kicked out of their home) to get the kids to stay, which isn't really a choice.

So that is what "Exit Plan" means.  No, we never had anything like that.  I would imagine if she became a chronic runaway that they would suggest another step, but she would always be welcome home.



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« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anne Bonney

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #19 on: September 30, 2010, 02:37:07 PM »
Quote from: "Whooter"
So that is what "Exit Plan" means.  No, we never had anything like that.  I would imagine if she became a chronic runaway that they would suggest another step, but she would always be welcome home.


That's great that you wouldn't use that tactic, but it is definitely "suggested" in Aspen programs.

And what would that 'other step' be?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
traight, St. Pete, early 80s
AA is a cult http://www.orange-papers.org/orange-cult.html

The more boring a child is, the more the parents, when showing off the child, receive adulation for being good parents-- because they have a tame child-creature in their house.  ~~  Frank Zappa

Offline Anne Bonney

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2010, 02:38:10 PM »
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"

And what would that 'other step' be?

Usually it entails sending them off to yet another program.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
traight, St. Pete, early 80s
AA is a cult http://www.orange-papers.org/orange-cult.html

The more boring a child is, the more the parents, when showing off the child, receive adulation for being good parents-- because they have a tame child-creature in their house.  ~~  Frank Zappa

Offline Whooter

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #21 on: September 30, 2010, 02:49:15 PM »
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"

And what would that 'other step' be?

Usually it entails sending them off to yet another program.

I never got that far but knowing business practices I am sure they have another aspen program which would take kids who are a flight risk.  ASR wouldnt take those types.



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« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Hedge

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Re: Whooter and the hotlines
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2010, 03:08:46 PM »
Quote from: "Whooter"
Abuse occurs so infrequently that I dont believe that this would become a requirement even understate or federal regulation.

Neither you nor I are qualified to speak about the frequency of abuse. Please feel free to visit http://http://www.childhelp.org/pages/statistics for more information about how often child abuse is reported in the United States. We can safely assume that not all child abuse is reported, so those numbers are baselines. Neither of us can say "my experience was X, so it must be that everyone experiences X." Not every child in every facility was abused because I was. But if you were not abused, or you know of someone who wasn't abused, this does not decrease the likelihood that many children are, and were.

And actually, there is already a relevant federal regulation in place: a law called "mandatory reporting." Every single staff member who witnessed abuse but did not report it to the local authorities is in violation of the law.

For reference, here is a brief description of what minimum definitions for child abuse is, in the United States.

Quote from: "Susan K. Smith, Attorney at Law (see below for link)"
"CAPTA mandates  "minimum definitions" for child abuse and sexual abuse. Child abuse or neglect is any recent act or failure to act:

Resulting in imminent risk of serious harm, death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse, or exploitation

Of a child (usually a person under the age of 18, but a younger age may be specified in cases not involving sexual abuse)

By a parent or caretaker who is responsible for the child's welfare"

http://http://www.smith-lawfirm.com/mandatory_reporting.htm


So, there should not even be a need for kids to report abuse directly to the authorities - the staff members are required by law to do the reporting if they witness abuse, or if a child mentions abuse or neglect. For details about the specific punishments for not following this law by state, please visit http://http://www.rainn.org/public-policy/legal-resources/mandatory-reporting-database.

But, as several people have confirmed, their experiences were also that they were blocked from making abuse reports to anyone outside the facility (and I detailed the joke that reporting abuse within the facility can be). We might hope and envision that kids would be encouraged to make reports when abuse takes place so that every child should be safe. Because that is theoretically the job of the facility: keeping kids safe.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline RobertBruce

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Re: Abuse Hotlines for Programs
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2010, 10:14:06 AM »
:bump:


This was a conversation actually worth having. What, aside from stupid reasons like Whooter John's phone sex fantasy, and his plan to order 100 pizzas, are any legitimate reasons to not have an abuse hotline?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »