Author Topic: internet safety argument  (Read 743 times)

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Offline Oz girl

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internet safety argument
« on: January 12, 2008, 05:57:36 AM »
What are the risks? My sister is thinking of demanding the myspace/facebook etc passwords of my nephews and niece for safety purposes. She fears mainly online paedophiles. My argument is that if you don't believe in listening in on phone calls deliberately or reading a kids diary (and she doesn't) then it is a bit cheeky to hack into their internet accounts.

As her kids are not allowed to meet any kid they met online without the kid coming over to the house (this way she knows they are not 40) i cant see the risk. Who is right and are there any risks I have not considered?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2008, 06:24:11 AM by Guest »
n case you\'re worried about what\'s going to become of the younger generation, it\'s going to grow up and start worrying about the younger generation.-Roger Allen

Offline Che Gookin

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internet safety argument
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2008, 06:06:55 AM »
There are quite the few pervos on the net. Just take pervertedjustice.com for instance. They devote endless hours and energy to lure pervs out into public for the purpose of getting them arrested.

Now I think your sister is right to be concerned. How she goes about it might be up to debate. No clue really what my opinion on it is.

My thought is take a slegde hammer to the computer and buy her kids bicycles, but then they might use them to ride to the pervos house.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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internet safety argument
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2008, 11:27:00 AM »
That's a fucking joke. They'll just delete everything 'juicy', hand her empty accounts, occasionally update them to pretend they're playing with them, and then use other, "real" accounts to actually talk to their friends on.

Your sister should probably be shot in the face.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline dishdutyfugitive

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internet safety argument
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2008, 04:54:23 PM »
why are you so face shooty?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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internet safety argument
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2008, 01:37:15 AM »
i think it's a good idea.

some people, especially girls...just put WAY TOO MUCH unnessary information on their profiles. The privacy concern is worthwhile.

I wouldnt bother getting their passwords. have her make her own account, the freind request her kids. make sure the kids set their profile so their mom can see the entire thing. if there's an issue, ask them to change it, not change it for them.

know the difference between PREVENTION and INTERVENTION in this case. prevention is always better.

By not allowing too many pictures, too flirty of a profile, telling your kids the internet is a bad place to look for a boyfreind  etc...you PREVENT peadophiles from establishing the kids as targets, further preventing you from having to intervene when the peado shows up at your house cuz he got horny for your daughter from seeing a kissyface webcam photo.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Nihilanthic

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Re: internet safety argument
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2008, 03:31:35 PM »
PROTIP:

IF KIDS WENT OUT INSTEAD OF STAYING AT HOME THEIR IDIOT PARENTS COULDN'T BE SUCH CONTROL FREAKS BECAUSE THEIR KIDS WOULD BE OUT OF THE HOUSE.

THEY WILL NOT LEARN HOW TO MAKE DECISIONS IF YOU CONTROL THEM OUT OF PARANOIA. PEDOS CAN STILL GET THEM IN PERSON. IN FACT YOU ARE CREATING SOMETHING THEY CAN CAPITALIZE ON TO WEDGE THEM FROM YOU.

INSTEAD, TEACH THEM HOW TO MAKE DECISIONS SO THEY DONT END UP REBELLING WILDLY WHEN THEY MOVE OUT.

LOVE,

COMMON FUCKING SENSE>
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Covergaard

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Re: internet safety argument
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2008, 11:58:33 PM »
All our computers are in the living room. None have private computers. Of course I have work-related areas, which are password protected, but my family can look me over the shoulder and I can look them over the shoulder.

When the children get boyfriends/girlfriends they can use the computers to contact them, but yesterday I talked with my 9-year daughter about how to communicate on the computers with classmates due to the latest development in Denmark:

A month ago students in a public school aged about 11 used a chat-room on a compeditor to Myspace called Arto. They talked about favorite teachers to hate and in the heated atmosphere on of the called a teacher "paedo" - shortening for you know what. The communication was intercepted by one of the schools "Google alerts" and 11 students were suspended for a week. The head teacher wanted to expell the 11 year old boy to another school, but the parents stood side-by-side and apealled to the city hall and the politicians called the head teacher to order, so the boy remained at the school but in parallel class.

So I told her that she under no circumstance must report such incidents to anyone unless she is the victim. She had no idea what sex is about and if she state something that she due to her childlike innocence has misunderstood, she would be in trouble.

But the important part is that the parents could have stopped these students if they have been in the room when the chat had taken place. So speak openly about things.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Re: internet safety argument
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2008, 10:13:30 PM »
Carsten, I think the parents were 100% right this time and the schoolpeople were just as silly as one should have come to expect by now of schoolpeople. No crime was committed. In context it sounds like an offhand comment, not a credible accusation. But then again, ya never know. I remember a lot of side talk about a particular teacher of mine in high school. Nobody took it too, too seriously till the dude got busted peeping the girl's locker room through the girls' coach office one way glass window. Another reason to not even try to stifle such speech.

10 years ago, when my 8yo was fascinated with The Realm, I had sort of the same policy. The kids' machine was in our home office so we were always hanging around each other. I also just explained things to her and laid down some rules. Don't give out your real name, age or address. It's ok to lie sometimes. Look it up, there isn't even a X-tian commandment against it, honest to God. There's one about being a lying, dirty, rotten snitch (bearing false witness against one's neighbour) but not a peep about speaking untrue statements for good cause. But I didn't present this to her, or even think much of it, from a fear driven perspective. Instead, I saw it as an opportunity for her and I to learn some interesting truths, plus it would make a really fun entry for her home-schooling portfolio should it come into question at a later date. I wanted her to see for herself how ridiculously easy it is to fool a willing believer so that she would grasp the whole concept. That way I wouldn't have to waste precious time and energy making a plethora of specific rules or surveiling and enforcing them.

And you're right, guest. The net views censorship as damage and routes around it.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »