Author Topic: Into The Wild  (Read 3271 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2007, 12:18:21 AM »
i know the person in the story personally and you have no idea what you are talking about. sure there are stories of violence and death, but his isn't one of them. get over yourself.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline hurrikayne

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OH my gawd
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2007, 12:46:50 AM »
...
« Last Edit: July 01, 2008, 09:37:23 PM by hurrikayne »
"Motivation is everything. You can do the work of two people, but you can\'t be two people. Instead, you have to inspire the next guy down the line and get him to inspire his people. " - Lee Iacocca

Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2007, 02:57:14 PM »
No, you get the fuck over yourself. I'm not the one hubristic enough to abduct and imprison a normal human being so they can learn to “discharger their feelingsâ€
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline TheWho

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Into The Wild
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2007, 03:03:42 PM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""phoebe""
the boy didn't know how to discharge his feelings. at all.  it sounds like the truth circles at the program enabled him to open up and get at the deeper issues. there ARE deeper issues.  not every wilderness therapy story is a bad one.  yes, their relationship was affected, but clearly good came from it as well.

I'm going to discharge my feelings in the form of a gun aimed at your head.

Critically, who the hell are you to abduct anyone, and hold them captive to get them to "discharge" their feelings? How bout I abduct you? Where do you live? Honestly, I'd like to know. I am going to come and kidnap you, and take you into the wilderness.

I'm also going to rape you, no, don't thank me. I just want you to learn some lessons. Then, I'm going to cut off your left foot. Again, what has this been shown to help? NOTHING. Wilderness abduction has never been medically proved to do anything but hurt, as cutting off your left foot has never been proved to do anything but harm. So What.  Maybe, you’ll get at the deeper issues

Any trauma  always makes you get at the deeper issues as you’ve been freshly supplied with deeper issues by the trauma.
You’ll definitely learn how to handle your anger. Well, you’ll need to. You don’t have a foot. That's horrible, right?


Anyway, so please post your address so we can begin the magnificent journey of abduction/rape/mutilation therapy.


It seems clear that you did not have a good experience, but that doesnt mean many other children do not.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Aspen Cedu, Synanon child torturer
« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2007, 04:24:53 PM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""phoebe""
the boy didn't know how to discharge his feelings. at all.  it sounds like the truth circles at the program enabled him to open up and get at the deeper issues. there ARE deeper issues.  not every wilderness therapy story is a bad one.  yes, their relationship was affected, but clearly good came from it as well.

I'm going to discharge my feelings in the form of a gun aimed at your head.

Critically, who the hell are you to abduct anyone, and hold them captive to get them to "discharge" their feelings? How bout I abduct you? Where do you live? Honestly, I'd like to know. I am going to come and kidnap you, and take you into the wilderness.

I'm also going to rape you, no, don't thank me. I just want you to learn some lessons. Then, I'm going to cut off your left foot. Again, what has this been shown to help? NOTHING. Wilderness abduction has never been medically proved to do anything but hurt, as cutting off your left foot has never been proved to do anything but harm. So What.  Maybe, you’ll get at the deeper issues

Any trauma  always makes you get at the deeper issues as you’ve been freshly supplied with deeper issues by the trauma.
You’ll definitely learn how to handle your anger. Well, you’ll need to. You don’t have a foot. That's horrible, right?


Anyway, so please post your address so we can begin the magnificent journey of abduction/rape/mutilation therapy.

It seems clear that you did not have a good experience, but that doesnt mean many other children do not.


I am going to continue raping and foot chopping as "treatment".

The thousands of lobotomy/rape victims who say having such “treatmentâ€
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2007, 01:50:13 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""phoebe""
the boy didn't know how to discharge his feelings. at all.  it sounds like the truth circles at the program enabled him to open up and get at the deeper issues. there ARE deeper issues.  not every wilderness therapy story is a bad one.  yes, their relationship was affected, but clearly good came from it as well.

I'm going to discharge my feelings in the form of a gun aimed at your head.

Critically, who the hell are you to abduct anyone, and hold them captive to get them to "discharge" their feelings? How bout I abduct you? Where do you live? Honestly, I'd like to know. I am going to come and kidnap you, and take you into the wilderness.

I'm also going to rape you, no, don't thank me. I just want you to learn some lessons. Then, I'm going to cut off your left foot. Again, what has this been shown to help? NOTHING. Wilderness abduction has never been medically proved to do anything but hurt, as cutting off your left foot has never been proved to do anything but harm. So What.  Maybe, you’ll get at the deeper issues

Any trauma  always makes you get at the deeper issues as you’ve been freshly supplied with deeper issues by the trauma.
You’ll definitely learn how to handle your anger. Well, you’ll need to. You don’t have a foot. That's horrible, right?


Anyway, so please post your address so we can begin the magnificent journey of abduction/rape/mutilation therapy.

It seems clear that you did not have a good experience, but that doesnt mean many other children do not.



THANK YOU!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2007, 10:53:51 AM »
"The fourth and final phase is 24 hours of complete isolation, and encompasses the self-sufficiency skills acquired throughout the course. It is also a time for the teenager to reflect on the personal changes made throughout their stay and to get ready to return home."

That is the final cruelty -- telling the kid for 53 days to work the program, express his feelings and all that -- only to find out later that he's not really going home. Hardly anyone goes home -- the vast majority go straight from wilderness to a teen prison that is euphemistically referred to as a "boarding school" or "treatment center."

As bad an experience as wilderness can be, the TBS or RTC can be so much worse that some kids actually try to get themselves sent back to wilderness.

The good news is eventually mom & dad will be completely broke, and as soon as the checks stop coming, the kid is immediately declared "cured" and released. He or she may no longer have a home to go back to (mortgage foreclosure and all that), but at least he/she is no longer imprisoned without a trial or determination of guilt.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline TheWho

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« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2007, 11:31:45 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
"The fourth and final phase is 24 hours of complete isolation, and encompasses the self-sufficiency skills acquired throughout the course. It is also a time for the teenager to reflect on the personal changes made throughout their stay and to get ready to return home."

That is the final cruelty -- telling the kid for 53 days to work the program, express his feelings and all that -- only to find out later that he's not really going home. Hardly anyone goes home -- the vast majority go straight from wilderness to a teen prison that is euphemistically referred to as a "boarding school" or "treatment center."

As bad an experience as wilderness can be, the TBS or RTC can be so much worse that some kids actually try to get themselves sent back to wilderness.

The good news is eventually mom & dad will be completely broke, and as soon as the checks stop coming, the kid is immediately declared "cured" and released. He or she may no longer have a home to go back to (mortgage foreclosure and all that), but at least he/she is no longer imprisoned without a trial or determination of guilt.


Most of the kids go home afterwards. The kids that do not either already know that they are moving on to a boarding school setting from wilderness or their time in wilderness showed that the child would benefit from going on to a next step prior to returning home.  

I find it interesting how so many here view isolation as being so negative and some even view it as abusive.



...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2007, 11:36:26 AM »
Isolation that is not self-imposed is abusive.  One of the defintions of cruel and unusual punishment is isolation. Unless, you are Pinochet or Bush.
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Offline TheWho

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« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2007, 11:54:13 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Isolation that is not self-imposed is abusive.  One of the defintions of cruel and unusual punishment is isolation. Unless, you are Pinochet or Bush.


Ha,Ha,Ha  sitting in the woods for a time and reflecting on yourself is not considered cruel and unusual punishment.   Being forced into a 6’X6’ cell without food or water is!!!  Isolation takes on many forms and can be very beneficial to the individual.

Sure being forced to breath fresh air when you want city smog could be considered abusive if that’s what the kids wants (by your definition), but the child needs to be guided and told what is good for them until they become adults and head out on their own.


...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2007, 12:09:08 PM »
Quote
Ha,Ha,Ha sitting in the woods for a time and reflecting on yourself is not considered cruel and unusual punishment. Being forced into a 6’X6’ cell without food or water is!!! Isolation takes on many forms and can be very beneficial to the individual.


So, a cell like this is abusive?



courtesy of spring creek lodge, montana

Thanks Who, for proving my point!
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2007, 12:10:40 PM »
maybe being forced to lay face down in a cage, too?

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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2007, 12:15:43 PM »
TheWho wrote: "Most of the kids go home afterwards"

More bullshit statements from fornits' favorite troll.

Why don't you ask kids who have been there? Better yet, ask wilderness program staffers. From them, the number I hear for the percentage of kids who go on to residential aftercare is somewhere north of 80%.

For the few kids who get to go home, the reasons are usually financial -- not the result of program counselors' recommendations. It seems to be very rare that a program counselor would recommend a kid go home rather than to another program. But sometimes the parents simply don't have the money.
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Offline TheWho

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« Reply #28 on: November 14, 2007, 12:43:53 PM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote
Ha,Ha,Ha sitting in the woods for a time and reflecting on yourself is not considered cruel and unusual punishment. Being forced into a 6’X6’ cell without food or water is!!! Isolation takes on many forms and can be very beneficial to the individual.

So, a cell like this is abusive?



courtesy of spring creek lodge, montana

Thanks Who, for proving my point!


Oh boy, a history lesson and this is suppose to represent all schools ?

Here is a typical family who would love to have an opportunity to live there:

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Into The Wild
« Reply #29 on: November 14, 2007, 12:44:29 PM »
Quote
TheWho wrote: "Most of the kids go home afterwards"

More bullshit statements from fornits' favorite troll.


What else is new?
His own admission of "being locked in a 6'x6' cell with no food or water, basically describes most isolation *units* in programs. So, he can spin this whatever way he can.

But the facts don't lie.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »