Author Topic: Human Rights Violations Game  (Read 1049 times)

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Offline katfish

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Human Rights Violations Game
« on: September 07, 2005, 03:05:00 PM »
This is a game.  How many HR violations was MMS guilty of?  Can you spot them?

Article 1.
All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2.
Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3.
Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4.
No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5.
No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6.
Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7.
All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 8.
Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9.
No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10.
Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

Article 11.
(1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.

(2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

Article 12.
No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

Article 13.
(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.

(2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

Article 14.
(1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.

(2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 15.
(1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.

(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

Article 16.
(1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.

(2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.

(3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Article 17.
(1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.

(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

Article 18.
Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Article 19.
Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

Article 20.
(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.

(2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

Article 21.
(1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

(2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.

(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

Article 22.
Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

Article 23.
(1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.

(2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.

(3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

(4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article 24.
Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Article 25.
(1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

(2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

Article 26.
(1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.

(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.

(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Article 27.
(1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.

(2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

Article 28.
Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29.
(1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.

(2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.

(3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 30.
Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead

Offline OverLordd

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2005, 07:56:00 PM »
There is why I really don't trust the U.N. sorry, but they gave a cop out to the parents that sent you to MMS

Article 26
Section 3
Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Sad hmm?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
our walking down a hallway, you turn left, you turn right. BRICK WALL!

GAH!!!!

Yeah, hes a survivor.

Offline katfish

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2005, 08:17:00 PM »
Well, I would argue that you have to look at the what defines education and observe a respect for human rights.


26.2
 Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead

Offline Anonymous

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2005, 12:05:00 PM »
27-1-221. Punitive damages -- liability -- proof -- award. (1) Subject to the provisions of 27-1-220 and this section, reasonable punitive damages may be awarded when the defendant has been found guilty of actual fraud or actual malice.
     (2) A defendant is guilty of actual malice if the defendant has knowledge of facts or intentionally disregards facts that create a high probability of injury to the plaintiff and:
     (a) deliberately proceeds to act in conscious or intentional disregard of the high probability of injury to the plaintiff; or
     (b) deliberately proceeds to act with indifference to the high probability of injury to the plaintiff.
     (3) A defendant is guilty of actual fraud if the defendant:
     (a) makes a representation with knowledge of its falsity; or
     (b) conceals a material fact with the purpose of depriving the plaintiff of property or legal rights or otherwise causing injury.
     (4) Actual fraud exists only when the plaintiff has a right to rely upon the representation of the defendant and suffers injury as a result of that reliance. The contract definitions of fraud expressed in Title 28, chapter 2, do not apply to proof of actual fraud under this section.
     


I THINK JOHN MERCER IS A FRAUD, MISREPRESENTED HIMSELF, AND INTENTIONALLY DISREGARDED THE HARM HE INFLICTED UPON US- HE CERTAINLY ACTED MALICIOUSLY, OR, AT BEST FOUND PLEASURE IN OUR SUFFERING, IN THE WAY HE TREATED US.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2005, 09:04:00 PM »
i like this game so what about the constitution.

i believe this one hit the nail

Article XIII.
Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2005, 11:54:00 PM »
http://www.hrw.org/children/

What HRW says about Children's Rights

The global scandal of violence against children is a horror story too often untold. With malice and clear intent, violence is used against the members of society least able to protect themselves?children in school, in orphanages, on the street, in refugee camps and war zones, in detention, and in fields and factories. In its investigations of human rights abuses against children, Human Rights Watch has found that in every region of the world, in almost every aspect of their lives, children are subject to unconscionable violence, most often perpetrated by the very individuals charged with their safety and well-being.

 

Children are exposed to other human rights abuses as well. Millions have no access to education, work long hours under hazardous conditions, are forced to become soldiers, or languish in orphanages or detention centers where they endure inhumane conditions and daily assaults on their dignity.

 

These abuses persist because children have few mechanisms for reporting violence and other human rights violations. They may be reluctant to speak out for fear of reprisals. And because they are children, their complaints are often not taken seriously. Even when children do make reports or abuse is exposed, perpetrators are rarely investigated or prosecuted. Those in a position to take action may be complicit in the abuse, reluctant to discipline or prosecute a colleague, or fearful of negative publicity. Adults who witness abuse by their own colleagues and attempt to report it may be fired for speaking up.

 

The year 2005 marks the fifteenth year of the entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the landmark treaty that guarantees children the right to be free from discrimination, to be protected in armed conflicts, to be protected from torture and cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, to be free from arbitrary deprivation of liberty, to receive age-appropriate treatment in the justice system, and to be free from economic exploitation and other abuses, among other rights.   Achieving these rights remains a challenge.  Governments must take stronger action to implement the convention's provisions and fulfill their promises to the children of the world.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline katfish

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Human Rights Violations Game
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2005, 12:51:00 PM »
http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/right ... e_216.html

These rights are about your right to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation.
You have the right to be protected from physical and mental injury and abuse, and from neglect, whether you're living with your parents or other approved caregivers. Your government should do everything it can to ensure this protection, including making sure laws are in place and that you have access to services and spaces where you are safe from harm. (19)

You should not have to do work (child labour) that is dangerous or might interfere with your education or otherwise harm your development. You should also be protected from 'economic exploitation' ? in other words you should not have to work for unreasonable rates of pay or for long hours or miss getting an education. Governments should set a minimum working age and enforce 'appropriate' rules about hours and working conditions (although the Convention does not set an age, the International Labour Organization suggests that children can do light work from the age of 13, or as low as 12 in countries at a lower level of development). (32)


http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/right ... e_214.html

Expressing your opinions (13) is another crucial right in this group. In particular, it is your right to have your say ? and be listened to ? when adults are making decisions that affect you. And this should not just be lip-service. Your opinions should be taken into account, and be given 'due weight' according to your age and maturity. (12)

The law should prevent unfair or illegal interference with your privacy, your correspondence, your family, and your home. In other words, you have the right to private and confidential communication with people at home and elsewhere, for example in health clinics. You should also be protected from 'unlawful attacks on your honour and reputation' (16), especially in legal matters.
 
You also have the right to free association: that is, to get together with other children and young people and to join groups and organizations. (15)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead