Author Topic: Mikey slashing his wrists  (Read 2143 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2004, 09:36:00 PM »
Well, as long as it helped you[/b].  Never mind the hundred or thousands that it destroyed or damn near.  Since a few felt that it helped them, I guess it was all worth it. :roll:
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Offline Anonymous

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2004, 09:38:00 PM »
And you don't know HOW you would have turned out had you NOT gone in...just like I don't know how I would have turned out had I not gone in.  You may very well have grown out of it just like the majority of kids do, given the chance.
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Offline Robin Martin

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2004, 10:02:00 PM »
Quote
On 2004-12-18 18:38:00, Anonymous wrote:

"And you don't know HOW you would have turned out had you NOT gone in...just like I don't know how I would have turned out had I not gone in.  You may very well have grown out of it just like the majority of kids do, given the chance."


UH...I DON'T THINK SO!  You just don't get it - but that's OK.  That's what this site is for...sharing our memories; black, white and the greys in between.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
bid you peace!

Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2004, 10:34:00 PM »
OK, you don't think so.  But you don't know.  You really don't.  Some of those people that I spoke of earlier were some pretty hard core cases.  There were two of them that even back then I thought would end up dead.  They're fine.  They're happy, they're settled and feeling pretty content with themselves.  These people who I gave ZERO chance of surviving past 25 are doing FINE.  

I get it, believe me I get it.  Your beloved program destroyed so many more lives than it ever helped.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline GregFL

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2004, 10:35:00 PM »
Quote
On 2004-12-18 18:29:00, Robin Martin wrote:

"
Quote

On 2004-12-18 17:51:00, Anonymous wrote: Somehow they made it through adolescense without benefit of any program.



NO DOUBT...but I wasn't one of them.  All I'm saying is some of us needed it, many did not.  I also believe it takes a strong spirit to be able to seek help and move on.  Some of us are stronger than others...others are more sensative.  We all handle difficult situations in our own unique way.  I've had some very traumatic incidents over the years (and even when I questioned giving up) I DID NOT give in!!  I remain in contact w/ ex-druggie friends of mine who were walking down that same path as I, and you know what??  They just quit doing drugs - just like that!!  How did they do that? I have no idea - it was not in me at the time and I NEEDED assistance. I'm sorry that so many of you suffered at the hands of the Seed, but I, did not."


Good post Robin. You make some good points. Your friends, Many of them I am sure, that made it without going to the seed...here is the big secret....ready?

They did it because they were never hopeless addicts that were destined to be dead insane or injail without Art "saving" them. Non patentable Drugs and particularly marijuana have never lived up to their boggyman hype. Sure They can be dangerous and destructive but most people learn to manage their use and eventually stop, going on to the more important quests of life like success, a family, a job, a future.  Its true....only the truly self destructive and obsessive compulsive types seem to get caught up in the addictive process.


The whole "one way street" hype  was just a myth, Robin.  


And as far as listing people that didn't make it,I could play that as well, starting with Big Frank, seed graduate and SDF poster that died of an overdose just last year. When he went into the seed he was a thirteen year old that was subjected to cruel abuse.  He carried that with him till just recently when he tragically died with a needle in his arm.

The list of fallen seed "graduates" is long, painfull, and extremely telling.  Bennett Beverely, jumped of the skyway. Cris, one vehicle accident, Dave L, Overdose, Mickey...blew his brains out...Pat D, in jail, Jimmy W, on the lame, and the list goes on and on...


I contend that the seed harmed many more people than it helped including most of the "sucessfull graduates" that hung around like a celebate art barker martyr for some 10 to 15 years, delaying the normalcy of having children, a family and a normal social situation, all buying into  the deadinsaneorinjail stepcraft lie.

 The experience doesn't harm everyone, this I know, and some people needed an extreme intervening circumstance in their life. Some people are even saved by going to jail or a mental hospital. It doesn't make it a pleasant or rewarding experience, it just happened at the right (or wrong) time. This also doesn't validate the underlying treatment modality. People have stopped using drugs by joining all types of cults, including the moonies and the hari krisnas. Most of the young guys you uses to see beating tambourines and jumping around in flowing robes were pot heads first. Most moonies and Scientologist and other cult members have checkered pasts.  Some people ALWAYS stop using drugs. It is the normal human condition to try to rise above your present situation, and linking up with mind cults is one way people try to self improve. I submit that most often it is a tragic mistake that results in loss to the individual. Others seem to thrive under that type of self made societal structure.

BTW, the other day I was playing around on our states Inmate website and saw an old friend of mine in jail from dealing drugs. He never went to the seed. In fact, he used to tease me a bit. He has been in and out of jail since he was about 20. Would the seed have saved him? Would his savior be worth many others being harmed?  How do we reconcile our experience by saying it was worth it to save one kid and tear another family apart or to  doom another to a lifelong mental problem.... Or another to an impending feeling of worthlessness and despair for 30 years or so, never understanding why?

This modality harms people and tears families apart. It always has. I am living proof. It also intervenes in some people's lives and gives them a fresh start. Still others are left proclaiming they were saved from impending doom of death, insanity or jail when in fact there is no basis for that proclamation other than a stint in behavior modification that strongly imbedded the stepcraft myth in their hardwired memory, that left them believing before a magical date they were doomed to extreme failure and worthlessness and after said date were totally transfixed into a productive person.

Where do we take this conversation from there? Those are the facts as I see them. I know others don't agree. I trust my research and instincts on this one....
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Offline Jimmy Cusick

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2004, 10:32:00 AM »
At age 15 I was the typical druggie in suburbia via 1974. I smoked pot most days before school and I took L.S.D. a few times. I experimented with speed and seconol and a few other pills. In July 1974 90 Percent of the seed population was in a similiar boat when it came to drug use. As I recall very few of us were hard core drug addicts. I will refer to them as "Junkies". I truthfully dont know if any of the junkies were "saved". I remember Libby was a heroin addict and so was Robert Chun and black Arthur the graduate were successful.

It seemed like most teenage seedlings had "attitude" problems and drugs were ancillary. If we were addicted to drugs we were also addicted to long hair and bell bottoms. That was a phase we were going through and many of us could have done fine without the seed but there are those of us that needed a major attitude adjustment and I was one of them.

The seed saved my ass. I took drugs but they were not really my problem. Living life without escaping was my problem. The seed had created a new enviroment for me, drug free for starters, that was scary because I had to live life on life's terms without escaping to never never land. Over a period of days , then weeks, then months my outlook on life improved dramatically> I dropped my "freak" image and did very well in school and became a reliable and  dependable kid with good social skills (with seedlings, we werent allowed to talk to druggies which were everyone else)

What happened to all my old druggie friends? I honestly dont know because I went home to Fairview Park and told a few that I didnt want to talk to them and word got out so I didn't have to worry. Lucky for me I went to a different High School in my senior year. The weird thing is that I looked through my sisters yearbook from 1976(my graduation year) and almost all of the guys (from my old school) that I smoked dope with and raised hell were not in that year of the yearbook. What do you suppose happened to them? I suspect that they burned out and then dropped out or got in serious trouble. Maybe it was as Timothy Leary used to say "Tune in, Turn on, Drop out"

The seed indeed is all you need to stay off the junk and the pills and the weed, we come each day from 10 to 10 and if you screw up you'll start again. Junkies and freaks throughout the land join our family hand in hand, working together from morning till night we help each other win the fight ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

What a cult song
Anyhow the cult saved my life and My family was very proud of me

Peace and love to ALL seedlings!!!
Jimmy :wave:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline TRUCKER

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2004, 08:30:00 AM »
Wrong--You saved! your ass! The Seed showed you what it takes to do it---not drugs or booze.  Now it seems that you are once again standing on the ledge on one foot.Strange you you would bring up suicide on you latest post! I know that the holiday season will increase this feeling! My feeling is only the strongest survive in any  setting. Yea you can blame all your problems on everyone else or other reasons  as I have read on many of these threads but you are the only one that can make the call! I dont have to be touchy and  feely to care ! Your family is watching. :tup:

                      TRUCKER
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Offline Anonymous

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Mikey slashing his wrists
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2004, 09:17:00 AM »
Does anyone remember a guy named Seth?  I always thought he was a good guy.
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Offline cleveland

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« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2004, 09:23:00 AM »
Sure I remember Seth - worked at Sears, loved to read, played classical guitar? Yup...more introspective than your average Seedling. Good guy.
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ally Gator

Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2004, 04:38:00 PM »
Sure I remember Seth S. Good guy he used to drive me in the a.m. when I was a new Comer. He also helped me view things in the correct light I needed to see them in. I was stuborn when I first came in and Seth was very direct and never pulled his punches in my case that is what I needed. Seth was a hard person to figure out but he was a good and well rooted person

CCGAR
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »