Author Topic: Cult weirdness and speculation abounds  (Read 1470 times)

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Offline Stripe

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Cult weirdness and speculation abounds
« on: October 16, 2006, 03:21:23 PM »
Friday night evening news  10/13 (had to either be CBS or NBC )had a story regarding where Mark Foley has gone for rehab. Like it really matters in the grand scheme of things....

Cult specialist Rick Ross was on, voice only, speculating as to Mr. Foley's whereabouts.  Ross said maybe, based on Mr. Foley's love of Hollywood stars and his donation/support records, that Mr. Foley is in a rehab at the Scientology Center in Clearwater, FL.  Did anybody else catch this, or was I in a Friday the Thirteenth warp?

Really now, does the crutch of scientology have an actual durg and alcohol rehab center there? All this time I thought it was just a straigh-ahead cult.. I mean church.  I did not know it was a full service operation.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
The person who stands up and says, ``This is stupid,\'\' either is asked to `behave\' or, worse, is greeted with a cheerful ``Yes, we know! Isn\'t it terrific ?\'\' -- Frank Zappa

Offline GregFL

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Cult weirdness and speculation abounds
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2006, 04:22:22 PM »
Ever here of Narconon?

That IS the church of scientology and has been embroiled in controversy for years.

http://www.narconon.org/

The Narconon program has from the beginning been founded on key principles developed by author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard. The keynote is that an individual is responsible for his own condition and that anyone can improve his condition if he is given a workable way to do so. It is based on improved understanding of his fundamental nature: that man is basically good and it is pain, suffering, and loss that lead him astray.

In the early '60s, Mr. Hubbard was one of the first to see the long-term consequences of the accelerating drug culture. He responded warmly to William Benitez's request for help with his fledgling Narconon program in Arizona State Prison and continued to write up his observations on the effects of drugs on the individual person, his body, and the society as a whole.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Stripe

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Narco-non
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2006, 01:40:37 PM »
I really did not know that the Narco program was a spin-off from the Chruch of Scientology.  I've heard of Narco for years.  But based on the name alone, I assumed it would be just like AA but for narcotics addicts. Modeled with the 12 steps and such.  

I looked at that web site you provided and I could not see any direct mention of the Church of Scientolgy.  Maybe once you get futher into the ownership of an independnet clinic you might find out.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
The person who stands up and says, ``This is stupid,\'\' either is asked to `behave\' or, worse, is greeted with a cheerful ``Yes, we know! Isn\'t it terrific ?\'\' -- Frank Zappa

Offline Anonymous

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Cult weirdness and speculation abounds
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2006, 01:08:34 PM »
this link is right on the first page.


http://www.narconon.org/about_lronhubbard.htm
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Cult weirdness and speculation abounds
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2006, 08:52:36 PM »
The clams intentionally chose the name "Narconon" in order to create the illusion that they're associated with Alcoholics Anonymous. I know a lot of people on this board aren't fond of the twelve-steppers, but they have nothing to do with the clams.

Mark and the clams, on the other hand, deserve each other.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »