Author Topic: Kick-backs and Contributions  (Read 1956 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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Kick-backs and Contributions
« on: May 06, 2006, 10:21:00 AM »
So "Kick Backs" aren't allowed, but "Contributions" are?
And how are those contributions used?
To promote the warehouse industry.

Aspen Education Group pledges $100,000 to IECA Foundation

(From left to right) Len Buccellato, Allen Cardoza, Elliot Sainer, Jared Balmer, Brooke Dudley, Lynn Luckenbach, and Ed Kowalchick celebrate the generous contributions given during the start of the 2004 Annual Giving Campaign.

The IECA Foundation is pleased to announce that Aspen Education Group has pledged to contribute $100,000 over the next four years. The contribution has been earmarked specifically for consultant and counselor training as they work with youth in the midst of making educational decisions. The formal announcement was made to the IECA membership and school, college, and program representatives at a luncheon held during IECA's Fall Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona on November 7.

According to the Foundation's Treasurer, Jason Katz, "This contribution will be extremely helpful in allowing the Foundation to continue its work of giving grants to those worthy students who need additional resources and guidance. A big thanks to Aspen!"

The IECA Foundation will sponsor a workshop on learning disabilities with Dr. Mel Levine in Boston on Wednesday, April 28, 2004. A portion of the Aspen gift will be used to fund this workshop.
~~~~~~

The ANNUAL Giving Campaign is Underway!
The 2003-2004 IECA Foundation Annual Giving Campaign began October 1, 2003 and runs through January 31, 2004, however, donations are accepted throughout the fiscal year, July 1, 2003 through June 30, 2004. Pledges to the IECA Foundation may now be made online. Just fill out and submit the simple form. You will be billed according to your pledge.
~~~~~

St. Louis Community Counseling Day a Tremendous Success!
The main goal of the Counseling Day was to create a partnership between independent and public school counselors and the students in St. Louis. The Foundation also hoped that this would serve as a model for similar programs in future conference cities.

Non-Compliant Adolescents Workshop
Over sixty public school counselors attended the five-hour workshop with IECA member consultants and school admission professionals presented by nationally acclaimed author and psychologist, Dr. Ross Greene. The cost of the workshop, underwritten by the Foundation, was waived for public school counselors. Additionally, the public school counselors were given breakfast, lunch, parking and Dr. Greene's book, The Explosive Child.

Student and Family Call-In Session
The call-in session, publicized on television, in local high schools and at a college fair in St. Louis for weeks leading up May 1, was held at St. Louis' NBC affiliate, KSDK. For seven hours, 28 IECA members and Foundation Boardmembers utilized the television station's phone back to answer questions from over 300 students and parents. Questions ranged from how to get financial aid for college to options for teens at risk. Questions were also accepted via e-mail and were posted and captured on the IECA web site.

St. Louis Community Counseling Day had several positive outcomes:
?Public school counselors have a caseload of approximately 500 students per counselor. The professional development the St. Louis area counselors received impacted both the counselor and the hundreds of students these counselors assist each year.

? A relationship between independent counselors and the St. Louis Public School System was formed, allowing for future exchanges.

The IECA Foundation hopes to replicate this program in Scottsdale, Arizona prior to the IECA Fall Conference in November 2003.

http://www.iecafoundation.org/news/news.htm#Top
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Bonus at Graduation? Not a commission or a contribution?
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2006, 12:43:01 PM »
In addtion to contributions, I heard that some TBS/RTC facilities will give a cash bonus to the Ed. Cons. after the resident graduates from the treatment program.   It is not exactly a commission.  Some programs, like HLA, will claim that they do not pay any commissions to Ed. Cons. upon enrollment of a resident in the program, which may be true.  However, they do not say anything about the bonuses paid out after graduation.  

Bill
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Kick-backs and Contributions
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2006, 02:13:21 AM »
Take a look at some of the stuff in their Powerpoint presentation.

"Educational Consultants are skilled professionals who provide private counseling to help students and families choose a school or college that is educationally sound, growth-producing and individually appropriate."

Really? Anyone so inclined can print up some business cards on their inkjet, set up a website, declare themselves to be an Educational Consultant and start referring kids to programs. Ok, maybe I'm not being fair -- maybe they only consider IECA members to be "skilled professionals" in the trade. So what does it take to become an IECA member? Basically (a) be in the business, (b) pay your membership dues.

Now let's see about some of the training seminars they provide for their members:

»Eating Disorders Workshop, Pennsylvania
»Adoption Workshop, Ohio
»Explosive Child, Missouri
    -- With invited counselors of every St. Louis public school
»School Violence Workshop, Rhode Island
»Adolescent Residential Life Seminar, Texas

How odd. A naive person might think an Educational Consultant -- someone who claims to "help students and families choose a school or college that is educationally sound" -- might be attending seminars on things like college admissions strategies, financial aid and scholarship applications, vocational school options, educational alternatives for children with learning disorders, etc. Instead, out of the 5 seminars listed above, all seem to fall under the realm of either psychology or criminal justice/incarceration. What makes an EdCon qualified on any of these subjects? Oh yeah, he went to a brief seminar on each one -- and he's paid up on his annual membership dues.

And you gotta love this:

"The IECA Foundation does not directly fund individual scholarships."

So where does the money go? Their fabulously detailed and informative pie chart shows simply: 47% "Grants," 28% "Programs," 14% "Management" and 11% "Fundraising."
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »