Author Topic: Dore E. Frances  (Read 9109 times)

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Offline Antigen

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Dore E. Frances
« on: February 05, 2006, 08:18:00 PM »
pages bearing her phone number

From Lon's site, "FRANCES, DORE - Educational Consultant
Dore has agreed to help CEDU parents, at reduced rates, during this crisis.
866-833-6911"

CEDU closing was a crisis?!

Anybody else have dealings w/ this woman?

For more than a hundred years much complaint has been made of the unmethodical way in which schools are conducted...with what result?  Schools remain exactly as they were.
--Comenius,1632

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
"Don\'t let the past remind us of what we are not now."
~ Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Sweet Judy Blue Eyes

Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2006, 11:43:00 PM »
Quote

CEDU closing was a crisis?!




Actually, yes, in that it left a bunch of kids and their parents "scrambling" on very short notice to pack, move, and find new arrangements for education and any other needed help.  And, courses stopped only partly completed.  You may not have liked CEDU, and there were some things less than they might have been (and others more), but the point was the closing was (or created) a crisis, not whether or not it should have closed but the suddenness of same.
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Offline Antigen

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2006, 05:09:00 PM »
Well, Dore, you're operating from the faulty premis that the kids were getting therapy and education at CEDU. Home was probably the best "other arrangement" possible for most, if not all, of those kids. I hope a good many of them made it there, too.  

When I started as a federal narcotics agent, the budget that we were working with, it was less than $5 million a year, and there was only 125 agents for the entire world to work the narcotic trade that we were fighting in those days.  Times have changed.  The gluttony has grown.
--Nick Navarro, former Broward, FL Sherrif

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
"Don\'t let the past remind us of what we are not now."
~ Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Sweet Judy Blue Eyes

Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2006, 06:51:00 PM »
The above comment was not from me.  

I always identify myself.

Dore E. Frances

Child Right's Advocate, Educational Consultant,
Family Coach, Mediator

 :wink:
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Offline Deborah

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2006, 01:11:00 AM »
Frances reviews Maia's book:

Reviewer: Dore Frances "defrances" (Bend, Oregon) - See all my reviews
     
This book was a long read for me personally. It was brutal.

In my opinion, unless you are the parent of a teen who needs intervention and yuo have tried all local resources with no results, unless you have had to sit down with yourself and make that gut-wrenching decision that leaves you feeling like the bottom of the world has just dropped away, unless you have personally visited programs and schools and cried each visit because you see someone there just like your child, unless you spoke to the staff and students, and spent time doing complete background research yourself, unless you have placed your child in the hands of others and had to trust that you were leaving your child in the very best place for them at that time, unless you went through the process with your child as an involved parent and looked at your own faults, unless you celebrated with your child all their accomplishments and heard them say "Thank you for saving my life", even 5 years after they graduated, unless you spend time in this industry in one way or another, unless the very best for the child is always your first concern and priority, you really cannot, in my opinion, make an honest opinion or evaluation about this book.

In my ten years of experience as an educational consultant and child right's advocate, and twenty years as a mother, most programs and schools, adolescent escort services, therapists, and educational consultants are ethical and treat children with dignity. As in any business, and as it is in life, people are human, and will make choices and mistakes that are not always in the best interest of those they serve. That is sad, unfortunate and a fact of human behavior and life.

In the news we only hear about the boot camps that are committing horrendous mistreatment of adolescents and teens. We very rarely hear about the success stories. Any person or program that attempts to steal a soul and harm a child needs to be out of business today.

No matter how "bad" a child may behave or what choices they make to get themselves into trouble, it is never necessary to subject them to brutality of any kind or steal their worth as a human being. This book seems to bring up some very old information and not enough new information.

Again, unless you step into the shoes yourself, anyone can write anything at anytime and make it appear the way in which they feel will "sell" more books to already fragile family's in need of help.

I did not see any "realistic" alternatives to helping these families with their children. Is that the next book?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/custom ... 85-8598210
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gt;>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Hidden Lake Academy, after operating 12 years unlicensed will now be monitored by the state. Access information on the Federal Class Action lawsuit against HLA here: http://www.fornits.com/wwf/viewtopic.php?t=17700

Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2007, 01:43:29 AM »
i jread that creatures review and got sick.
its  interesting that she talks about how no one has the right to judge untl they "have had to make that terrible decision" to  send a kid to program...and NOT that no one has the right to judge unless THEY WERE THAT KID THAT WAS SENT TO PROGRAM!
 Ultimately, as the recipients of the "intervention" WE ARE THE JUDGES she should be looking to.

That says alot about this womans viewpoint-she responds to the desires of the guaridans i- not the needs of the youth. She doesnt  see we are not commodities manipulated to service the adults deserires but humans. Therefore assisting with our abduction is not a "service", but a crime . She is trafficing in human children as much as any other slaver with just as handsome a payoff. Its this empathic deficit that allows peple like her to operate

.
Look lady, the kids who were abused 30 years ago, the kids who were abused like me 6 years ago, and the kids who were abused 2 years ago are all abused in the same manner under the same pretexts. Your very existance is evidence of their continued abuse in the exact same way.

 Thats becasue is abuse de facto -nay torture, for you and the parents you represent to simply declare  kids "insane" and abduct them becasue of it, as much as it would be if I did that to YOU. Neither of you are authorities to do that anymore than I am. Before anyone has authority to abduct kids they should be declared insane  under very specific criteria by a qualified profeessional who will be held responsible for faulty decisions. They  deserve the right tp a hearing where they can defend themself against that charge of insanity, just as YOU would have if you were charged. This way they life isnt a complete Orwelian nightmare that is enough in itself to send any child spiraling into madness.

Then and only then can they be taken to a qualified HOSPITAL with qualfied DOCTORS who work with them under the very specific laws of medical protocal- not under whatever yocal that want s to rake in 5,000 a month after declaring himself an owner of a "school" for the troubled kids- which is the case of EVERY SINGLE program in existance today.
Kids deserve this as YOU do, becasue like YOU they are human. In fact And as they are not human traficers perhaps they deserve this more than YOU. They are human and until you and your henchmen realize that you will continue abisuing them in the identical fashion you always have
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Offline Ursus

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2007, 04:17:49 AM »
Quote from: ""Deborah""
Frances reviews Maia's book:



Reviewer: Dore Frances "defrances" (Bend, Oregon) - See all my reviews

     

This book was a long read for me personally. It was brutal.



In my opinion, unless you are the parent of a teen who needs intervention and yuo have tried all local resources with no results, unless you have had to sit down with yourself and make that gut-wrenching decision that leaves you feeling like the bottom of the world has just dropped away, unless you have personally visited programs and schools and cried each visit because you see someone there just like your child, unless you spoke to the staff and students, and spent time doing complete background research yourself, unless you have placed your child in the hands of others and had to trust that you were leaving your child in the very best place for them at that time, unless you went through the process with your child as an involved parent and looked at your own faults, unless you celebrated with your child all their accomplishments and heard them say "Thank you for saving my life", even 5 years after they graduated, unless you spend time in this industry in one way or another, unless the very best for the child is always your first concern and priority, you really cannot, in my opinion, make an honest opinion or evaluation about this book.



In my ten years of experience as an educational consultant and child right's advocate, and twenty years as a mother, most programs and schools, adolescent escort services, therapists, and educational consultants are ethical and treat children with dignity. As in any business, and as it is in life, people are human, and will make choices and mistakes that are not always in the best interest of those they serve. That is sad, unfortunate and a fact of human behavior and life.



In the news we only hear about the boot camps that are committing horrendous mistreatment of adolescents and teens. We very rarely hear about the success stories. Any person or program that attempts to steal a soul and harm a child needs to be out of business today.



No matter how "bad" a child may behave or what choices they make to get themselves into trouble, it is never necessary to subject them to brutality of any kind or steal their worth as a human being. This book seems to bring up some very old information and not enough new information.



Again, unless you step into the shoes yourself, anyone can write anything at anytime and make it appear the way in which they feel will "sell" more books to already fragile family's in need of help.



I did not see any "realistic" alternatives to helping these families with their children. Is that the next book?



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/custom ... 85-8598210


This "review" invested an inordinate amount of text devoted to Dore on Dore and nary more than two sentences on the actual book in question.

I could not have said it better myself:
Quote from: ""Guest""
Look lady, the kids who were abused 30 years ago, the kids who were abused like me 6 years ago, and the kids who were abused 2 years ago are all abused in the same manner under the same pretexts. Your very existance is evidence of their continued abuse in the exact same way.
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Offline Ursus

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2007, 07:00:48 PM »
From the website of USA Guides Inc., specializing in "youth transport":

Quote
In a Press Release issued by Dore Frances, an Independent Educational Consultant.

I enjoy working with Sherry Andersen, as well as all the staff at USA Guides. They have more than proven their capabilities during some very difficult transports in and out of the country. This is most easily reflected in some of the wonderful letters I received from parents that I worked with and in which Sherry and her team assisted. I'd like to share them with you.

The first letter was passed along by L. Dahlke, of El Segundo, California, 15 year old daughter, writes:

"In May of this year, I had contacted Dore Frances to assist with placement of our daughter. She referred us to USAGuides to assist in bringing her to her program. USAGuides was successful beyond my expectations. I wish to voice my appreciation for the care and treatment our daughter received while she was in their care. I thank them for all they did to make this easier for me."

The next letter was passed along by M. Copper, of Honduras, 13 year old daughter, writes:

"The only person I found who would help me, being so far way on assignment, was Dore Frances. I had no contacts in the U.S., and she referred me to USA Guides to assist with bringing my daughter to her program. She had just been kicked out of a program in Utah, who said they could help her, but then realized they couldn't. They placed her in a hospital, and then called me in Honduras and said I had 24 hours to come and get her. I cannot say enough concerning my gratitude and appreciation for what Dore and USA Guide's did. USA Guide's even took the time to stop and buy her some shoes on the way. I again had the pleasure of USA Guides helping me with my second daughter just last month. The director personally drove to the airport to meet her. He is a wonderful and truly caring person. Dore Frances is also a truly exceptional person and I feel she is in exactly the field of helping kids and families she should be in."

And this from J. Lange, of New York, 17 year old daughter, says:

"I wish to express my most heartfelt thanks and gratitude to Dore Frances for recommending USA Guides. All of the staff were in contact with me during the entire procedure from start to finish. Our daughter even developed a good relationship with her escorts, and that means more to me than I can say."

I have so many, but here is one more from C. Aibel, Pennsylvania, son 17, writes:

"We took Dore Frances's advice to go with an escort because of our son's drug use. As it turns out, we really did need to depend on the USA Guides team to help us. They were so nice, friendly, helpful, understanding, patient and professional. I really enjoyed not having to go through this without their help."

http://www.youthtransport.us/?page=2_14


This was in the 'Parent Testimonials' section, taking up close to half the space thereof.  Why does this sound like yet another advertisement for Dore?  It seems like she'll exploit any venue to get some more words in plugging herself.  Of course, in this case, it may be mutual admiration; perhaps USA Guides doesn't get too many positive parent testimonials...
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Offline hanzomon4

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2007, 10:05:04 PM »
It gets me how parents will sing the praises of programs and end it with
Quote
I again had the pleasure of USA Guides helping me with my second daughter just last month


I only see the next str8 generation "in the making" in these  words....
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i]Do something real, however, small. And don\'t-- don\'t diss the political things, but understand their limitations - Grace Lee Boggs[/i]
I do see the present and the future of our children as very dark. But I trust the people\'s capacity for reflection, rage, and rebellion - Oscar Olivera

Howto]

Offline Ursus

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2007, 04:00:25 AM »
For what it's worth, her website:

http://www.guidingteens.com/index.php
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Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2007, 07:38:44 PM »
Dore received her masters degree recently... looks like she is about to become a "real" educational consultant.  Also, have you heard about her "cruise?"
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Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2007, 08:00:21 PM »
Nope, what about her cruise?
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Offline Anonymous

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Newsletter
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2007, 01:43:44 AM »
Dear Jane,

After your child leaves by escort service to attend their residential treatment program, or after you have dropped them off at their  boarding school, there is no other day like that day.  For me, that day was February 10, 2001.

Most parents remember the date as if it was as memorable as they day they gave birth or adopted their child. That doesn't mean that the second day or third or even the fourth day after they are away is any easier, or that the first angry letter from them does not break your spirit, but it is that first day that punches a hole in your heart. Welcome to a different place in your life than the one you woke up to the day before they left. After they leave the air is different, as is the scenery.  Your knees don't feel as if they are going to hold you up; in fact, you may want to fall to them.

Go ahead if you need to.

For a precious little while, you are allowed to be stunned into silence, or to shriek, or to talk - recounting the days and events that brought you to this day, how much you miss them already, and how it came to be that they needed more help than what you could give them. Tell the stories of what happened to bring you to this day as many times as needed. Some people may say "enough is enough" or "be glad the drama is over."  Ignore them.

Besides, when you treat yourself gently and take the time you need, one day soon you will hear a faint but steady voice of your own good sense in knowing you did the right thing for your child and your family. Play music you love, sit in the sunshine when you can find some, and if anyone offers you a hand, hold it.  Let them feed your cat, too, because they want to be helpful.  If your good sense does not kick in on its own, help it along: scramble some eggs.  You may be feeling strange.  But if you just do something normal and simple, like scrambling some eggs, you will feel better.

For some of us who have had this experience this feeling seems endless. However time does pass, seasons change, and, truly, do you want to mope the entire time?  Come back into the world.

Soon you will return to feeling normal again, but, in the meantime, the garden needs weeding, the bills need paying, the garbage needs to be taken out.  Your other loved ones need you.  And you, you could use a bit of normal life.

Dore E. Frances, M.A.

Articles of Interest

 
 
 
Tips for Parents of Teenagers

Be wary of "boot camps" for troubled teens:  Be cautious when choosing a "boot camp" for a troubled teen. Standards for these places vary wildly, and some of them are dangerous.

Teenagers have died in poorly run facilities.

Speak to police, social services, and the Better Business Bureau before sending your teen to a particular facility, or work with an Educational Consultant.

Don't dismiss complaints from your teen: Does your teen have headaches, sleep problems, stomach aches, waking up problems?

Take complaints seriously -- they might indicate an emotional, physical, or  social problem. Ask your teen, and then listen. This is your opportunity to find out what's really happening. When your instincts tell you that something is not right, don't just chalk it up to teen angst. Listen to your gut, and press for more information or for outside help.

Make sure your teen gets enough positive, undivided attention: While you don't have to worry about them accidentally eating the poinsettia, you do have to know whom they're with and what they're doing. You still need to make sure they're getting proper nutrition (don't allow them to consistently set the rules for where, when or what to eat!) and that they're getting enough sleep (don't allow them to set the bedtime!).

Make sure your teen has someone else to talk to: Make sure your teen has a doctor both of you trust, and that a working professional relationship has been established between them. When your teen wants to switch doctors, meet the new doctor to make sure you are comfortable with the change. Make sure your teen has confidants other than you (such as extended family, a religious leader, school counselor, and family friends). When you feel that others are leading your teen down a dangerous path, however, don't be afraid to step in. Your teen still needs your protection.

Not all teens are troubled:  Parents and teenagers need to know  that the majority of teens are not bad and are not likely to get into trouble. Most teens are fun, interesting, helpful, full of enthusiasm, and responsible. However, the teen years can be troubled times for some, and please make sure that when your family and/or teen does need help and support -- you need to find it and not wait.

Sleep/Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome May Lead to Behavior Problems: Some researchers are suggesting that children, and especially teenagers, don't get enough sleep and that many of the problems addressed by pediatricians might have a basis in the children being overtired (including possibly depression, hyperactivity, or illnesses). Difficulty in school might also be traced to sleep deprivation, they say. From elementary to high school, kids need nine to 11 hours of sleep a night.  
A good way to tell if your adolescent is sleep-deprived is to judge their behavior while awake -are they alert, energetic and motivated? - and also to judge how easily they wake up in the morning.


When they constantly needs an alarm clock, when they need to sleep in, when they need a cold shower to wake up - they are  probably not getting enough sleep. Catching up on the weekend doesn't work well, say experts, because the body doesn't use that kind of rest as well. It also throws the natural body rhythm off, making it harder for the adolescent to fall asleep at a regular time during the week.

Tell your teen what you think: Studies show that teens are less likely to do drugs, drink, smoke, and engage in premarital sex when their parents clearly tell them not to. Talk to your teen honestly and frankly. Provide them with the appropriate information that they need, and be careful to keep the lines of communication open. Does your teen appear to not be listening? Sometimes teens will appear to be shrugging off what you have to say when they are really just trying to appear cool. When you don't say anything because you assume they won't listen, you are leaving them in the lurch.

You're Still the Boss: Don't give up on your struggling teen:  The results of some surveys of teenagers reflect a dismay that their parents seem to "give up on them" when they hit adolescence.

Some parents back away from their daughters and sons, believing that they need "space" or room to rebel. Some parents even allow their adolescents to experiment with drugs, smoking, or sex, believing that they will do it anyway. However, many teens are puzzled or troubled by this sudden extra space they're given.

"It's like they don't care anymore," was how one teen put it.

"I don't understand why they don't know I'm having sex," said another. We suggest you not view adolescence much differently than any other year. Your teen no longer needs a diaper change, true, but now, more than ever, they need attention, guidance, hugs, love, praise, discipline, training in problem-solving, fun times with you, quiet times with you, and discussions about troublesome topics.

Having a problem communicating? Don't let it fester.


You still want to regularly set aside special time so you can play and talk together. You might not be able to play with toys, however you can play board games, bake or cook, try on makeup or learn to fix a car, go shopping, decorate a bedroom together, attend a ballgame or concert, learn a new language together -- or go camping, hiking, swimming, horseback riding... Other ideas:

 Together, start a paid or volunteer community service: pet sitting, lawn mowing, window washing, gardening, etc.
 Set up space for a garden and plant a garden together  
 Together, produce a home video or neighborhood play
 Together, put on a fun fair for younger children in the community
 Together, learn a skill you always wanted to have: CPR, lifeguard training, auto mechanics, hair styling, quilt making, Web site design, painting, sculpting, etc.

 
The list is endless. Be creative. Remember, once the lines of communication come down, it's tough to get them back up again.


Recommended By Our Readers
 
 
Parent Seminar and Cruise May 18 - 25, 2008


DO YOU REMEMBER WHAT IT FELT LIKE TO BE FOURTEEN, FIFTEEN, SIXTEEN?  

I DO.

What year was it when you thirteen?  


For me it was 1966. Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane, The Byrds, The Grateful Dead and The Yardbirds were playing at the Filmore in San Francisco. There were Negro (the word being used at that time) uprisings in Atlanta.


Star Trek ran the first episode. South Vietnam had their first elections. 385,000 American troops were in Vietnam. The Vietnam War was in full swing. Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam was formed.

George Harrison (of The Beatles ... remember them?) went to India for six weeks to meet with Ravi Shankar.

LSD was made illegal in the United States. The "V" sign for "peace" was born.  

John Lennon met Yoko Ono for the first time. The first Negro was elected to the Senate in Massachusetts. Ronald Reagan was elected governor of California. Housewives revolted against soaring food prices all across the United States. A summer long simmering tension between longhairs, police and shop owners along the streets of America took place. The cops would hassle kids for their hair being too long and shop owners felt the kids were panhandling and costing them business. We had a conservative government embroiled in an increasingly unpopular war, racial tensions, and a generation of disillusioned young people looking for something meaningful to believe in - teenagers hurled themselves into a sea of drugs and sex that they really were not ready for. These were troubled adolescence.

The only thing we could not be was "shocked".  Now, years later, we are reflecting on our youth, still, and working to figure out what it all means. Does being a teen mean you explore, triumph, and accomplish an important journey through adolescence, or is it a time of just big stupid mistakes and a total waste of time?  You tell me.

The immense challenges facing at-risk youth are apparent to virtually every parent who has a pre-teen, teen or young adult as well as anyone who has worked with this population. Finding one's way in the world, developing a strong sense of self, and functioning productively in a community can be challenging for adolescents even with every resource and support system available to them. For youth who are not afforded "safety nets" from their families and communities, mastering these developmental­ tasks can be overwhelming. During my years of work with at-risk youth, I have witnessed their struggle to navigate the transition into adulthood. Despite appearances, most of these young people are desperately seeking guidance, inspiration and support from the adults they come in contact with. And this is where the challenge is extended to all of us and especially you, their parents.

Starting at approximately $1195 per person based on double occupancy for inside cabin (cruise and seminar). Special air add ons are available from any major airport.

Dore Frances has been teaching Parent Seminar courses for over ten years. She has a down to earth and humorous approach that takes the guesswork out of parenting and leaves parents feeling inspired.

Dore is a Child Rights Advocate and Educational Consultant, is a writer of the Family Solutions News monthly newsletter, and monthly columnist in the Bend, Oregon Bulletin.  Because we want to save royally with early booking discounts, knowing in advance of your interest would be extremely beneficial.  Please make your deposit as soon as possible to get best cabin availability.

Deposit required of $350 per person. Deposits are refundable up until final payment which is due February 1, 2008. For additional cruise information and to make your deposit and secure your space, please send an email to our Travel Agent, Valerie Norman at Dore@DoreFrances.com.  

Space is limited to 16 state rooms, double occupancy.

Part of our service philosophy is ensuring every client enjoys a complete escape.  Therefore, we are going the extra distance.

Invest one week in your family's future while cruising and discover what it means to escape completely.

.... and your escape has begun!!

News and Views
 
NFL Legend Bart Starr to Receive 2007 Turn for Peace Award





Nonprofit ANASAZI Foundation to Honor Hall of Fame Quarterback and Wife at November 8 Gala

 
Legendary NFL quarterback Bart Starr and his wife Cherry will receive ANASAZI Foundation's "Turn for Peace" award at the nonprofit organization's annual scholarship dinner, which celebrates the achievements of young people who have overcome significant personal challenges.  The award presentation and dinner are scheduled for Thursday, November 8, at the new Phoenix Convention Center.  ANASAZI's Turn for Peace award is presented to extraordinary people who have made significant contributions to heal and strengthen families, specifically parent-child relationships.  

Past recipients include former First Lady Barbara Bush, country music star Wynonna Judd, author Stephen R. Covey, philanthropists Robert and Lynette Gay, entertainer Marie Osmond, Family Circus creator Bill Keane, and NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young, who nominated the Starrs for the 2007 award.  

In 1965, the Starrs co-founded Rawhide Boys Ranch, which continues to help at-risk youth and their families build healthy and life-changing relationships.  

As quarterback of the NFL's Green Bay Packers, Bart Starr was honored three times as Most Valuable Player, once as league MVP and as MVP of Super Bowls I and II.  He has received numerous other awards, including the NFL Award for Citizenship, and he is the inspiration for the Bart Starr Award, presented each year to the best Christian player in the NFL.  Elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977, Starr is the only player to quarterback a team to five NFL championships.  ANASAZI's scholarship dinner will feature a concert by Phantom of the Opera star Franc D'Ambrosio.  Proceeds from the November 8 fundraiser will enable financially challenged families to obtain the help they need for a struggling son or daughter.

For more information on the event or the Turn for Peace award, call (800) 678-3445 or e-mail http://www.anasazi.org information.

Press Releases
 
 
Vive! Introduces its Journey On™ Program To Bring Transition Aftercare Anywhere™ Directly to Families In Their Own Environment







Vive!, nationally-recognized as an effective family-focused transition programs, is taking its services "on the road" as it announces the launch of its Vive! Journey On™ program.  Journey On follows the proven, action-oriented program created by Vive! for young people and their families transitioning from residential treatment programs, yet takes it a step further by sending its team of professionals directly to families wherever they are in the continental United States and Hawaii.  


Like all Vive! services, Journey On delivers Aftercare Anywhere™ through a powerful, practical integration of mentoring and parent coaching to meet the needs of the whole family in its real-world context.

"Vive! Journey On allows us to work with families everywhere, so that we are not restricted by geographic location," shared Terry Tierney, CEO.  "Vive! has never been about bricks and mortar, as we profess a real life, real world approach to transitions and family healing.  Our regional offices will continue to function as hubs, but through the Vive! Journey On program, we now serve families anywhere within the U.S."  

The goal of Vive! Journey On is to help the family transfer the positive changes and momentum achieved in residential treatment to the family's real-world environment. The transition back into the real world can be difficult and is often marked by regression, relapse and recidivism.  To assist in this transition, Vive! applies its proven  "Dual Approach" of mentoring for the young person and parent coaching for the parent or guardian while engaging local professionals as well as representatives of the residential program.  Along with the support and oversight of a Vive licensed clinical team leader, this comprehensive team approach creates a strong web of support for the families

Journey On is a transition support program rather than a treatment program.  Journey On delivers real-time mentoring and parent coaching support, both in-person and by telephone, text messaging, email and even web video-cam.  By working with both the parent(s) and young person simultaneously, Vive! is able to help the whole family system work together to ensure a safer, more successful transition.


Elements of the Journey On service include:  


Parent Preparation prior to a client's  discharge date, One-Day Intensives with both the mentor and parent coach present in a family's hometown, Mentor visits every other week  and Mentoring and Parent Coaching Support via phone, email, text messaging and video cam in-between visits. While it is recommended that families participate in a six month engagement, Vive!  works with families on a month to month basis in order to cater the program to the specific needs of each family.

Vive! Journey On is designed for families with young people of any age who are completing a wilderness program or residential treatment program. The young person must be deemed ready for transition to the next environment by program staff in order to qualify for participation in Journey On.

Journey On Contacts:
Amanda Thomas, MS, serves as the National Referral Relations contact for Journey On.  She can best be reached at 303-775-1779.  Dave Herz, founder of Vive! and Certified Psychotherapist, handles all admissions into the Journey On program.  He can be reached by calling Vive! at 303-449-2516.

About Vive!
Vive! is a therapeutic, action-oriented program that works with young people and their families in the home environment. The program has been particularly effective in continuing the progress gained in residential treatment programs for the transition home with families all across the country.


The company is headquartered in Boulder, Colorado with a network of regional offices. For more information, contact Vive! at www.vivenow.comor 800.261.0127 or HoldenMcClurePR at 303.449.2526.  

 
 
Facts About Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior.

There are two specific diagnoses, Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa.


Bulimia Nervosa is characterized by repeated episodes of binge eating followed by unhealthy compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting; misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or other medications; fasting; or excessive exercise.


Anorexia Nervosa is characterized by a refusal to maintain a minimally normal body weight.


A disturbance in perception of body shape and weight is an essential feature of both Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bulimia Nervosa
Specific Culture, Age and Gender Features of Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia Nervosa has been reported to occur with roughly similar frequencies in most industrialized countries, including the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and South Africa. Few studies have examined the prevalence of Bulimia Nervosa in other cultures. In clinical studies of Bulimia Nervosa in the United States, individuals presenting with this disorder are primarily Caucasian, but the disorder has also been reported among other ethnic groups.


In clinical and population samples, at least 90% of individuals with Bulimia Nervosa are female.

Prevalence
The prevalence of Bulimia Nervosa among adolescent and young adult females ranges from 4% - 20%. The rate of occurrence of this disorder in males is approximately one-tenth of that in females.

Studies show that between 60% - 75% of all Bulimia Nervosa patients have a history of physical and/or sexual abuse.

Course
Bulimia Nervosa usually begins in late adolescence or early adult life.

The binge eating frequently begins during or after an episode of dieting. Disturbed eating behavior persists for at least several years in a high percentage of clinical samples. Hospitalization may be required to restore weight and to address fluid and electrolyte imbalances. The course may be chronic or intermittent, with periods of remission alternating with recurrences of binge eating.

Familial Pattern
Several studies have suggested an increased frequency of Bulimia Nervosa, Mood Disorders, and Substance Abuse and Dependence in the first-degree biological relatives of individuals with Bulimia Nervosa. A familial tendency toward obesity may exist, but this has not been definitively established.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anorexia Nervosa
Specific Culture, Age and Gender Features of Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia Nervosa appears to be far more prevalent in industrialized societies, in which there is an abundance of food and in which, especially for females, being considered attractive is linked to being thin. The disorder is probably most common in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and South Africa, but little systematic work has examined prevalence in other cultures. Individuals from cultures in which the disorder is rare, who emigrate to cultures in which the disorder is more prevalent may develop Anorexia Nervosa as thin body ideals are assimilated.

Anorexia Nervosa rarely begins before puberty, but there are suggestions that the severity of associated mental disturbances may be greater among prepubescent individuals who develop the illness.

However, data also suggests that when the illness begins during early adolescence, it may be associated with a better prognosis.

More than 95% of cases of Anorexia Nervosa occur in females.

Prevalence
One percent of all females in late adolescence and early adulthood meet the full criteria for Anorexia Nervosa. The percentage of females attending College tends to be higher. The reported incidence of Anorexia Nervosa has increased in recent decades.

Course
The mean age at onset for Anorexia Nervosa is 17 years, with some data suggesting bi-modal peaks at ages 14 and 18 years. The onset of this disorder rarely occurs in females over age 40 years.


The onset of illness is often associated with a stressful life event, such as leaving home for college, termination or disruption of an intimate relationship, family problems and physical or sexual abuse.

There is a significant relationship between all Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa patients who have a history of physical and/or sexual abuse. The course and outcome of Anorexia Nervosa are highly variable. Some individuals with Anorexia Nervosa recover fully after a single episode, some exhibit a fluctuation pattern of weight gain followed by relapse, and others experience a chronic deteriorating course of the illness over many years. Hospitalization may be required to restore weight and to address fluid and electrolyte imbalances. Of individuals admitted to university hospitals, the long-term mortality from Anorexia Nervosa is over 10%. Death most commonly results from starvation, suicide or electrolyte imbalance.

Familial Pattern
There is an increased risk of Anorexia Nervosa among first-degree biological relatives of individuals with the disorder. An increased risk of Mood Disorder has also been found among first-degree biological relatives of individuals with Anorexia Nervosa, particularly relatives of individuals with the Binge-Eating/Purging Type.


Studies of Anorexia Nervosa in twins have found concordant rates for monozygotic twins to be significantly higher that those for dizygotic twins.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Market Summary
Industrialized affluent societies
Primarily Caucasian
Onset between the ages of 13 and 18
Target age between 15 and 35
Bulimia Nervosa: affects 4% to 20% of all females
Anorexia Nervosa: affects 1% of all females
Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa affects in excess of 20% of all college females
Of all individuals exhibiting either disorder, 90% to 95% are female
Of all females exhibiting either disorder, 60% to 75% have a history of sexual or physical abuse or a traumatic life event

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Psychographic Summary
Females suffering from eating disorders also tend to exhibit certain personality traits and tendencies. Most are driven to succeed in either a profession or a personal relationship. All place high value on external reinforcement and acceptance.

Cultural values, including significant emphasis on personal achievement, successful dating, group acceptance, religious conformity and cultural homogeneity all increase the likelihood of women in Utah developing an eating disorder.

Personality Traits
Perfectionist
Poor self-esteem
Competitive careers
Achievement oriented
High stress familial settings
Unstable intimate relationships
History of trauma, sexual, physical and/or mental abuse
Eating disorders are complex illnesses that require intensive treatment. However, people suffering from eating disorders have an excellent chance for complete recovery.

Written By: Andrea LoBue, MFT



Parents of a pre-teen or teen struggling with an eating disorder need to seek professional help.  
 
Salvia is becoming the number one legal alternative to Marijuana

Salvia is becoming the number one legal alternative to Marijuana and Ecstasy among teenagers today.

Salvia Divinorum has been used as a "vision-inducing" mint by the Mazatec people of Oaxaca, Mexico and is a powerful hallucinogen.

The fresh herb leaves can be chewed and kept in the mouth or dried and smoked. It is an extremely powerful mind altering compound. Its effects are often extremely unnerving and there is a very real potential for physical danger with its use.
When the herb is consumed either by smoking the dried leaf or chewing the fresh leaves the effects are usually milder than when it is vaporized and inhaled (manner of use like free-basing cocaine). When consumed as such, one completely loses awareness of and control over their body, often moving about recklessly, while the individual has no awareness of where their body is or what it is doing.

Afterwards, users report they have no memory of any of their actual behaviors and they often remember very different events.

"The first time I successfully smoked it; I loaded up a decent-sized bowl and took a few hits. When you smoke salvia, it feels like smoking weed, except the smoke is a bit harsher. To successfully have a "salvia experience" or trip or whatever you want to call it, you need to smoke a deep, slow hit and hold it for about 30 seconds" ~ D.C., 17


Salvia is legal in the United States and can be easily bought on the Internet or in head shops for as little as $7.99 oz.

This extremely potent hallucinogen is becoming popular with teenagers and young adults. It is most often dried and smoked in a pipe or bong.


Parents need to be on the look out for Salvia Divinorum.

As Educational Consultants we provide helpful resources and services for troubled adolescents dealing with drug and alcohol abuse, defiance, delinquency, low self-esteem, mental health issues, rebellion, run away, truancy, violence and more.  
 
Teen Runaways

Each year one million teens leave home without permission. Runaways come from every social class, race, and religion. Typically, a teen runs away after a heated argument at home and stays with a friend close by for a day or two before returning home. Teens that repeatedly run away from home tend to stay away longer and usually have no plan of where to go.

According to the Runaway Hotline, nine out of ten teenagers return home or are returned to their home by the police within a month.

There are many dangers involved in running away. Alone in a strange city or on the highway, a teen is an easy target for thieves, pimps, drug pushers, and other violent criminals. The problems at home are replaced by more serious and more dangerous problems on the street. Most cities have shelters where teens can stay for a few days or weeks until things cool off at home. Going to a relative's home is also a safe alternative.


For more information on runaways call the

National Runaway Switchboard:

1-800-621-4000

24hours a day/7 days aweek

All calls are CONFIDENTIAL and they are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.


Learn more about HFS's unique services for troubled teens and their families
 
 
Juvenile Criminal Cases
The juvenile court system is set up to guide and rehabilitate young people. It's similar to the adult system, but with important variations.



How do juvenile proceedings differ from adult criminal proceedings?

Because juveniles do not have a constitutional right to a jury trial unless tried as an adult, judges hear most juvenile cases. Juveniles also do not have a right to a public trial or to bail. Under most state laws, juvenile offenders do not commit "crimes." They commit delinquent acts, some of which are acts that would constitute crimes if committed by an adult. The trial phase of a juvenile case is an adjudication hearing. This means that the judge hears the evidence and determines whether the child is delinquent. The court may then take whatever action it deems to be in the child's best interest.


The purpose is to rehabilitate, not punish.



How are juvenile proceedings similar to adult proceedings?

The fundamental elements of due process apply in a juvenile proceeding as they do in the criminal trial of an adult. For example, a child charged in a juvenile proceeding is entitled to:

notice of charges given in advance of any adjudication of delinquency;
an attorney, including one paid for by the state if the family cannot afford one;
the right to confront and cross-examine witnesses; and
the right to assert his or her Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination.
Finally, the state is required to prove its charges beyond a reasonable doubt, just as in the trial of any adult on a criminal charge.

When are juveniles tried as adults?

Juvenile courts usually hear cases involving persons between the ages of ten and eighteen. (The upper age may be lower in some states.) If the prosecution charges an older juvenile with a particularly serious or violent offense, the district or prosecuting attorney may request that an adult court try the juvenile as an adult. In some states, juveniles fourteen or older and charged with serious acts like murder, rape or armed robbery are handled in adult courts unless the judge transfers them to juvenile court.

What is a parent's responsibility in juvenile cases?

Depending on the state where you live, you might be liable (legally responsible) for the acts of your child if you failed to supervise or control the child properly. For example, California recently passed a "gang parent" law that authorizes the arrest of parents of juvenile gang members who commit serious offenses. Similarly, if your teenage driver has an accident or commits a crime while driving the family car, the court may hold you responsible. One example of this is a teenager driving while intoxicated and causing injuries to another.

American Bar Association


When Your Teenager Is In Trouble
 
Ask Glenda

 
Question

My 13-year-old daughter has become unbelievably rude and sassy with me lately. She's at her worst in front of her friends, such as when I'm driving them to the mall or when she has kids over for dinner or a video. It seems like she's trying to impress her friends with how tough she is, but it makes me furious. I know kids this age are moody, and I don't want to embarrass her by reprimanding her in front of her friends, but I'm feeling like a doormat. What is the best way to handle this? ~  C.E., Washington
 

My first thought is not about your 13 year old daughter's behavior, but about yours.


You are modeling the definition of insanity for your daughter:


Doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results!


Stop it!


She's established she's especially rude and sassy to you when she has an audience of her friends, yet you're still chauffeuring them to the mall, having them over for dinner and movies. As a parent you have a responsibility to set boundaries, which include respectful behavior. She's showing you no respect because your actions are telling her she doesn't have to. Stop rewarding her unacceptable behavior with privileges. You are teaching your daughter that it is ok to be rude and disrespectful. Have a one-on-one talk with her when her friends aren't around and let her know this is unacceptable and that these are privileges that can be removed. Rides to the mall and friends over for dinner, movies, etc. should be earned privileges based on good choices made by her. By rewarding her over blown sense of entitlement and rude behavior you are giving her the unspoken message that you condone this behavior. Being a responsible parent is not a popularity contest. But it is about doing the right thing for your child.

 
Question

Our teenage daughter just told us that she's pregnant. Our hearts are broken. How can we show her that we still love her and give her the support she needs when we are so disappointed? ~ E.A., Utah


The understatement of the day is that this is a tough situation for all of you. There are so many things to be considered and so many scenarios going on, and there's not enough space to address them all here. So let's focus on the most basic of questions, which is actually the one you asked.  Your daughter is likely terrified of what lies in front of her. At the same time, it must feel like many of your dreams as a parent just got extinguished. This is not the scenario you envisioned when you pictured the life ahead of her when she was a toddler. But it is your reality now. It is critical that your daughter never question whether or not you love her, or will stand by her. She knows she's disappointed you. She doesn't need to be reminded of that in your words, body language or advice. That will only create a void between you. You cannot make this about your disappointments. What she needs is your unconditional love.

Unconditional love means just that: without conditions.


Loving her unconditionally is your number one role as a parent.


Next, enlist the aid of professionals experienced in this area to guide all of you through this. None of you have to go through this alone. This will allow you to focus on healing the relationship with your daughter. She needs you now more then ever before.

Glenda Gabriel is a strong advocate for parent's rights and the parent-choice industry.  

Send questions to ASK GLENDA at Dore@DoreFrances.com.

Breaking News
 
 
 
I have recently completed my Masters Degree in Child and Family Studies, with an emphasis in assisting adopted children.

Being adopted myself this area of speciality is very near and dear to my heart.


Adoption has a lifelong impact on those it touches, and members of adoptive families may need and want professional help as concerns arise. Timely intervention by a professional skilled in adoption issues often can prevent concerns from becoming more serious problems. Professionals with adoption knowledge and experience are best suited to help families identify connections between problems and adoption and to plan effective treatment strategies. Sometimes a difficulty that an adolescent is experiencing can be directly linked to adoption, but sometimes the connection is not readily apparent. In other situations, issues that seem on the surface to be related to adoption turn out not to be at all. It is important that the the person and/or program/school you choose to work with understands that although the adoptive family is often not the source of the adolescent's problems, it is within the context of the family relationships that the teen begins to heal. Many issues experienced by adoptive families will not require professional assistance. For many families, postadoption services like support groups or education workshops and seminars will provide all the help that is needed.

However, when assistance is needed and wanted, the person or team best suited to work with a particular family will depend on the family's specific issues, as well as the professional's credentials, education, experience and training with adoptive families. It is important for adoptive families to share openly with their professional that their family includes one or more adopted persons and to inquire about the person's experience and training related to working with adoptive families and adopted persons. I look forward to working with any families or programs/schools to help them to understand the dynamics of adoption and to tailor treatment modalities to the needs of families and individuals impacted by adoption. Next month I am  writing about specific approaches to adoption therapy.

With warm regards,


Contact Horizon Family Solutions, LLC
 
Sincerely,
 

Dore E. Frances M.A.
Horizon Family Solutions, LLC
www.guidingteens.com
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Zehnders model..
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2007, 01:53:30 AM »
Welcome to TroubledTeenHelp.com

HORIZON FAMILY SOLUTIONS, LLC

CHILD RIGHTS ADVOCATE

EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANTS

PARENT COACH


Boarding schools for troubled teens including ADD boarding schools, Christian programs, girls boarding schools, military schools, and residential treatment.

Troubled Teen Help is a website for all parents, guardians and professionals.

As Educational Consultants we provide helpful resources and services for troubled adolescents dealing with drug and alcohol abuse, defiance, delinquency, low self-esteem, mental health issues, rebellion, run away, truancy, violence and more.

We include information on troubled teens, Help for Troubled Teens, Resources for Troubled Teens, Schools for Troubled Teens, Treatment Programs for Troubled Teens, Group Homes for Troubled Teens, and other related topics. Our site features the opportunity to sign up for a free monthly email newsletter.  We have launched a parent support forum for all of our clients.


Student and family consultation
Clinical boarding schools, emotional growth programs,
residential treatment centers and wilderness program advisory services
Child rights advocacy
Educational consulting
Parent coaching
"Our role is to serve students and families as an experienced, compassionate educational consultant. I believe we add enormous value and stability to what is often a complex and daunting experience. You may rely on us for clear, objective advice and guidance, based on a thorough understanding of your adolescent’s educational and emotional needs.”
Dore E. Frances, MA
Founder, Horizon Family Solutions


Ethical Standards

For Our Client Families

Press Releases

Recommended Reading

Some behaviors of struggling teens are evident while others are not. To help determine whether serious problems exist with your teen, click here for a checklist of questions to help identify dangerous behaviors that may necessitate immediate action.
Troubled Teen Checklist
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Dore E. Frances
« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2007, 06:55:07 AM »
Quote
Dore is a Child Rights Advocate


:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

They all are these days, aren't they?

Someone send a knife through her hard palate.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »