Author Topic: twinkie  (Read 2148 times)

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Offline dreammagician

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twinkie
« on: October 19, 2002, 09:03:00 PM »
Why is it we were not allowed good food, there was this day when we all got big macs, wowie, a trip to McDondalds, what a treat.
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Offline Shelby

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twinkie
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2002, 09:30:00 PM »
My guess is that good food would have cost good money.

Shelby
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Offline enough

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twinkie
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2002, 01:19:00 AM »
I would have to agree. Though the food in Atlanta was actually edible after Mike's Mom set up the kitchen and started cooking for us.

Food was used like any other tool in the cult to establish control. It is as cynical and simple as that. Virtually all thought-reform environments use food as a tool for domination.

Why would a therapy/rehab cult be any different than any other?
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Offline ladyjerrico

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twinkie
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2002, 10:56:00 AM »
My first couple of months in Straight Michigan they had Burger King every Friday night for everyone. The parents were dishing out 500 dollars a week (on top of the money they had to spend for our stay). People in Plymouth, most of them had tons of money.

There were a few parents of the kids who couldn't always afford this, so the Burger King thing stopped and we had to bring sack lunches from the host home.

However, my mom did mention that she still ended up giving 300 dollars or so a week for food.. she thought it was rediculous since most of us brought PB and jelly and apples back the building.
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usan Minns

Offline hedwigfan

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twinkie
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2003, 08:35:00 PM »
Did any of the Atlanta folks ever stay at Hannah Garrett's house? Her parents were from England, and cooked insane amounts of food, like roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. They had a big, spiral staircase, and the parents were pretty old. Mr. Garrett drove a Jag, I think (it was pretty old, too). Anyone?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
ll this world is but a play
Be thou the joyful player
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Offline Majiktrvls

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twinkie
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2003, 08:46:00 PM »
HOw absolutely wonderful to see you here, my brother! We had been speaking of you, wondering if you were lurking in the shadows, and apparently, you were!
Welcome back!
your Sista
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The New Definition of BITCH....Babe In Total Control of Herself!!

Offline Tampa survivor

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twinkie
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2003, 09:44:00 PM »
Good to see ya back J.
Bill
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Bill H
St Pete & Atlanta, never surrendered!
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Offline Powerful Attitude

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twinkie
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2003, 12:50:00 AM »
Yeah I remember the burger day.  It was a day of big excitement.  I acutally have to laugh when I think about how exciting.  When I was brought in, we had the famous PB and honey, and raisins and nuts.  The bologna boat, which consisted of one slice of bologna, one ice cream scoop of mashed potatoes, and a piece of processed cheese - sandwich style, and I think, a 10 oz. glass of something other than water.  Some of the host homes were wealthy as well, and there was no problem having food, all you wanted.  I hooked up with a buddy/host brother while I was in St. Pete, John Dowd.  That was the only peace I had while I was in FL.

P.A.
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t. Petersburg 1985-86, Dallas 86-87

Offline hedwigfan

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twinkie
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2003, 06:00:00 AM »
This is an old post that I was looking at yesterday, and it made me think about the Garrett's house. I think it was originally posted back in Oct or so--my reply was the only new one since then.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
ll this world is but a play
Be thou the joyful player
\"Maya\"  The Incredible String Band

Offline dreammagician

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twinkie
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2003, 10:09:00 AM »
If only most people did know how it was. When I got that Big Mac, I thought I was in heaven. I knew my days were over soon enough to be. Food as a requirement for the control of the young mind. dNow, we are getting older we start thinking of the future3 and how this could have screwed us up. This gets me kind of pissed off at the freajk heads that did it. Peanut butter diet as it may seem. I hate straight.
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Offline Don Smith

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twinkie
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2003, 03:15:00 PM »
The bologna boat, which consisted of one slice of bologna, one ice cream scoop of mashed potatoes, and a piece of processed cheese - sandwich style, and I think, a 10 oz. glass of something other than water.

I remember what was called the Florida Sandwich in St. Pete. My Oldcomer Jeff Waldron made them for me a couple of times.  Peanut butter, Jelly, Marshmellow Cream, lettuce, banana slices wedged bewteen two pieces of bread.  YUMMY!  (It really did taste good!)

Don
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t\'s not for me to question How God will provide for my needs. I only have to Know that He will.

Offline 85 Day Jerk

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twinkie
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2003, 06:15:00 AM »
I myself could not stand eating breakfast cereal.
I could tolerate Shredded Wheat, or Grape-nuts, but ever since they took Buckwheats off the market
I had lost my taste for them.  Plus, back home all the sugary kids cereals that my sisters liked were off limits to me to help control my acne.

The damn things are not very nutritious anyway and
I developed a habit of raiding the ice-box of any
decent leftovers and eating them for breakfast.  A
meatloaf sandwich is a great way to start the morning along with a half a grapefruit and cup of coffee, and you are set until lunch.  I found that I could really eat like a horse and nobody seemed to mind because I was clearing up space in the refridgerator.

One special treat that I would make for a newcomer
was my French Toast.  I used eggs and half & half
for the batter and put some cinnamon and nutmeg in it as well which made them go easy on the syrup
too.  Most newcomers would drown their shit in syrup if you let them, so we usually poured it on for them.  I encouraged coffee use in my home for "motivational purposes."  The coffee that my dad made was super strong and one of my newcomers
actually lost a fingernail doing that popping snap
thing because he was so jacked up!!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Inside a warehouse behind Tyrone Mall
we walked in darkness, kept hitting the wall.
I took the time to feel for the door,
I had been \"treated\" but what the hell for?