Author Topic: Letter: From parents to Parents  (Read 4674 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rusty Goat

  • Posts: 238
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2008, 11:05:54 PM »
open meeting every monday night... lol not just the 15th.    http://www.wpl.lib.in.us/evanced/lib/ev ... p?libnum=1 you goin?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline wdtony

  • Posts: 852
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.pfctruth.com
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2008, 11:24:12 PM »
Too busy right now, maybe DP can make it up there and gather some intel. I wonder why they are meeting every week on Monday, they have a compound up there to meet in.

Need a little time to get another job, another place to live and plan a few things and I might mosey on up there in a couple months.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Pathway Family Center Truth = http://www.pfctruth.com

Offline psy

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 5603
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://homepage.mac.com/psyborgue/
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2008, 01:39:51 AM »
Thank you all for your input, especially Hurrikayne and Ursus for your edits.  I'm now editing it lightly for formatting, keyword density, and links after which I will get the final stamp of approval from the original author and publish it on apall.org, as well as the individual blogs where appropriate.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Benchmark Young Adult School - bad place [archive.org link]
Sue Scheff Truth - Blog on Sue Scheff
"Our services are free; we do not make a profit. Parents of troubled teens ourselves, PURE strives to create a safe haven of truth and reality." - Sue Scheff - August 13th, 2007 (fukkin surreal)

Offline psy

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 5603
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://homepage.mac.com/psyborgue/
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2008, 02:31:49 AM »
Preview it here.  I've taken a lot of your suggestions.  There is a "read more" link as well as easy print and download as PDF links.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Benchmark Young Adult School - bad place [archive.org link]
Sue Scheff Truth - Blog on Sue Scheff
"Our services are free; we do not make a profit. Parents of troubled teens ourselves, PURE strives to create a safe haven of truth and reality." - Sue Scheff - August 13th, 2007 (fukkin surreal)

Offline wdtony

  • Posts: 852
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.pfctruth.com
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2008, 05:46:56 AM »
Quote from: "psy"
Preview it here.  I've taken a lot of your suggestions.  There is a "read more" link as well as easy print and download as PDF links.

The format is sweet. It looks like it is coming together nicely. When something is so long written, like the parent page (which is needed big time and includes a lot of good content) I think it is good to enter  sub-headings pertaining to the content at certain points to break up the paragraphs. It makes it easier for me to digest when I am reading a long read.

Examples:

Isolation techniques

In the beginning of the program, the kids are isolated from yada yada.....because blah blah....these techniques are widely used in cults and reportedly harm kids in these ways.

Lies you will hear

The program will explain "this" as "that" and this is how they fool you. I know, I was there and they did it to me yada yada.....

You know what I mean.........., yes sir, coming along nicely.

Disregard this if you wish, it won't hurt my feelings none.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Pathway Family Center Truth = http://www.pfctruth.com

Offline psy

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 5603
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://homepage.mac.com/psyborgue/
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2008, 06:12:15 AM »
Quote from: "wdtony"
Quote from: "psy"
Preview it here.  I've taken a lot of your suggestions.  There is a "read more" link as well as easy print and download as PDF links.

The format is sweet. It looks like it is coming together nicely. When something is so long written, like the parent page (which is needed big time and includes a lot of good content) I think it is good to enter  sub-headings pertaining to the content at certain points to break up the paragraphs. It makes it easier for me to digest when I am reading a long read.

Examples:

Isolation techniques

In the beginning of the program, the kids are isolated from yada yada.....because blah blah....these techniques are widely used in cults and reportedly harm kids in these ways.

Lies you will hear

The program will explain "this" as "that" and this is how they fool you. I know, I was there and they did it to me yada yada.....

You know what I mean.........., yes sir, coming along nicely.

Disregard this if you wish, it won't hurt my feelings none.

Actually, those are some really good suggestions.  I've been processing all your information and incorporating as many changes as possible although my workload just doubled when Kev dumped apall.org onto me.  Mind starting threads for those suggestions (lies you will hear, etc...)?  I'd like to see those ideas further developed as i'd like to have several different FAQs available to parents such as just what you're suggesting (similar to the lies section on my website, but more general).  In think explaining how the "con" as well as the "cult" aspect can work will help parents to better understand what is going on and better recognize an abusive/fraudulent treatment center (i.e. the majority of them).
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Benchmark Young Adult School - bad place [archive.org link]
Sue Scheff Truth - Blog on Sue Scheff
"Our services are free; we do not make a profit. Parents of troubled teens ourselves, PURE strives to create a safe haven of truth and reality." - Sue Scheff - August 13th, 2007 (fukkin surreal)

Offline BuzzKill

  • Posts: 1815
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2008, 11:03:56 AM »
Hi guys. What ever you want to do with it is fine with me. Use it however you think best.  I put it together from a series of letters I wrote to a pair of moms with girls in Darrington last year.  I did of corse do a good deal of editing to make it more general and to remove names - and believe it or not - to shorten it ;)  The editing is great - I can only thank you for taking the time with it.

Ya'll take care  :cheers:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Rusty Goat

  • Posts: 238
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2008, 06:30:44 PM »
psy says: "In think explaining how the "con" as well as the "cult" aspect can work will help parents to better understand what is going on and better recognize an abusive/fraudulent treatment center (i.e. the majority of them)."

RG says: Check out K Moya's "Understanding the Con Game". Lots of to the point explanation regarding the above quote. Was written a few years ago, but still holds 185%t true today. She posted it here and other places, if you need me to find it for you, let me know.
RG
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline psy

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 5603
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://homepage.mac.com/psyborgue/
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2008, 06:40:33 PM »
Quote from: "Rusty Goat"
psy says: "In think explaining how the "con" as well as the "cult" aspect can work will help parents to better understand what is going on and better recognize an abusive/fraudulent treatment center (i.e. the majority of them)."

RG says: Check out K Moya's "Understanding the Con Game". Lots of to the point explanation regarding the above quote. Was written a few years ago, but still holds 185%t true today. She posted it here and other places, if you need me to find it for you, let me know.
RG
Finding that would be cool, yeah.  Thanks!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Benchmark Young Adult School - bad place [archive.org link]
Sue Scheff Truth - Blog on Sue Scheff
"Our services are free; we do not make a profit. Parents of troubled teens ourselves, PURE strives to create a safe haven of truth and reality." - Sue Scheff - August 13th, 2007 (fukkin surreal)

Offline Rusty Goat

  • Posts: 238
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Letter: From parents to Parents
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2008, 11:08:23 AM »
Understanding the Con Game

May 2006
By Kathy Moya
 
You will or may already have heard the program's sales pitch; this report contains "the other side of the story." Please make an informed decision.
 
Table of contents
 
Origin of the Con-Game
The Con-Game as it Relates to the Troubled-Teen Industry
Exposing the Con
What are the Alternatives?
 
ORIGIN OF THE CON-GAME
The term con is used for any fraud in which the victim is tricked into losing money by false promises of gain.¹
 
Con-game is the short name for Confidence Game.  A confidence game is any trick, device or swindling operation in which a dishonest person wins the confidence of his victim in order to cheat the victim.² Though dishonesty for financial gain had existed long before; the specific "Confidence Man" was first coined in 1849 by the New York Herald to describe the deceptions of William Thompson.³
Thompson, dressed in genteel fashion, would approach wealthy New Yorkers and after brief conversations, ask, "Have you confidence in me to trust me with your watch until tomorrow?" The mark, placing confidence in Thompson's honesty would lend him his watch, only to have Thompson never return. Thompson's arrest was a nationwide sensation and the term "confidence man" passed into widespread use, including the title of Herman Melville's 1857 novel The Confidence-Man.?
There are many types of well known confidence games, some of which are: bait and switch; deceptive contests; some charity drives that take more money than they give; and too many more to name in this document.  However, we are going to focus on a few that closely resemble the con-game being played by the companies that make up the 'Troubled-Teen Industry.'
 
The Con-Game as it Relates to the Troubled-Teen Industry.
Some of the well known con-games that are played in the troubled-teen industry are the "get-rich-quick" schemes; the pyramid and multi-level marketing (MLM) schemes; the cult scam, and snake oil scams.
In the traditional "get-rich-quick" schemes, it may take the wider community years to discover that such investment schemes are bogus, and usually it is too late, as many people have lost their life savings in something they have been confident of investing in. The same results have occurred with the program.  People put confidence in the various "sales" people giving the sales pitches (this can include other parents who receive discounts on their child's tuition for 'referring' others to the program and educational consultants who also may receive kick-backs for referring to particular programs). Then they proceed to entrust complete strangers, with virtually no credentials, with the safety, well-being, and in some cases the custody, of their troubled children.  Parents who are desperate for the magical solution welcome the "good news" that there is an answer to all of their troubles, and therefore pour thousands of dollars into a program with their promise of a "fixed" kid in return - "the child you used to know." Unfortunately, people have lost their life savings at best, or in some very unfortunate cases, they end up losing their child, before realizing the program is nothing more than a confidence game. Of course, by then it is too late. The following quote, which was found on http:www.parentshelpingteens.com, illustrates how a parent can be lured into believing this con while unwittingly participating in a similar scheme called the pyramid (or Multi Level Marketing) scheme.
 
 ~Kathi Colton~
Again thanks... My son is slowly working his way back up after being put on Level 1.  He has now been in the program for 21 months and seems to be going into another depressive type of thing. I am just hoping to gain enough referrals... We have used up every financial resource we once had and have no other options. These referrals have saved his life. He is alive because of this program!!!
 
As a person from the outside looking in, it appears simple to see the scam. If someone's child has been in the program for 21 months and is starting the program over on level one and is going into a "depressive type of thing," most people would draw the conclusion that this program is probably not returning the promised results for the parent's monetary investment. However, a desperate parent who has put a child in a program because she has been convinced that without the program the child would be dead, insane or in jail, is imagining that the last 21 months of the child's life are 21 months he wouldn't have had, had he not been in the program. She has been convinced that she is literally saving her child's life by referring others to this program that has not really delivered on its promises. What better way to get someone to continue to sell your services, than to imply that if they don't, their child will die?
The programs also resemble cults in which it is alleged in many cases have the aim of obtaining money from their followers by deception. In the case of the program, the cult part of the scheme is played out on the children in the program, while their parents are being taken by the other con-games. The difference is that the aim of the program in the case of the children is to extract silence (not money) from them, while the money is coming from the parents in exchange for the program keeping their child alive. The program promises the children small rewards of food or small amounts of freedom in exchange for their silence. If a child reneges on his part of the deal, severe consequences are paid (the specifics on what the consequences are vary from program to program, but suffice to say, most children eventually learn how to keep quiet about what really goes on in the program.)
This brings us to the final confidence game this document will address. This is the confidence trick known as pseudoscience (or snake oil). Pseudoscience is defined in the American Heritage Dictionary as a theory, methodology, or practice that is considered to be without scientific foundation.?
All too often, people reach false conclusions about the world because of mistakes, or fallacies, in scientific reasoning. Then real science becomes pseudoscience. "Pseudo" means false, deceptive, or fake. One common fallacy involves seeing links between things that actually are not related. Suppose your friend observes that more people get heat stroke on hot summer days. He also observes that more people eat ice cream on these days. So he concludes that ice cream causes heat stroke. Pseudoscience also creeps in when we mistake anecdotal evidence for objective evidence.  Anecdotal evidence is "they say" evidence: "They say wearing a copper bracelet cures arthritis." "They say that reading in dim light ruins the eyes." Just because people say or believe something does not mean it is scientific fact. It takes objective experimentation to reach valid conclusions about the world.6
The foregoing confidence-games have been played on families in trouble. This final confidence game is played not only on desperate parents and teens, but on the wider community as well. Sometimes (usually due to high dollar contributions to campaign funds, by owners of programs) the program even finds high-profile politicians to further their cause. The community is now presented with a program which is endorsed by politicians, praised by parents who tell how their lives have been changed, and they hear the children talking about the changes in themselves. The children and parents may even change in their physical appearance, thereby convincing onlookers that the program must be working.  However, what the outside community doesn't realize is that the child lives in constant fear of being sent back to the program or being completely abandoned by their family if they don't play the game. (Exactly how this fear is achieved is addressed in the report called Understanding Behavior Modification Methods, which focuses on what actually goes on inside of the program.)
In the past, con-games were usually played by one person or a small group of people, and generally targeted (or 'marked') other individuals for deception as in the story about William Thompson, however, one-to-one con-games are much less successful than the con-games that are played today more often by entire institutions.  Institutions are perceived as having more experience and superior knowledge than one particular individual, as well as having the added large group dynamics (i.e. peer pressure type influences) advantage, which in turn makes an institution much more persuasive.
An ideal con game has the following attributes according to some excerpts from Essays on Religion by Albert D. Warshauer, M.D., 1991.
•   The confidence game, in return for payments (contributions) now, promises a huge payoff (reward) later.
 
•   Disbelievers who do not support the confidence game will not receive this reward and may be punished later.
 
•   Details which might expose the confidence game are avoided or not mentioned.
 
•   The victims advertise the con game to attract other marks.
 
•   The victims freely provide testimonials to the value of the game.
 
•   The mark can rationalize that the activity, although highly tilted in his favor, is basically honest, since other people have an equal opportunity to join the game and win.
 
•   The mark is not bothered by a sense of guilt since, to the best of his knowledge; his own participation does not harm anyone.
 
•   The victims cooperate in their own fleecing and support the game again and again.
 
•   The victims never realize that they have been swindled and therefore lodge no complaints.
 
•   If an occasional victim does realize that his money and resources are lost with no likely return, he can rationalize by believing he contributed to a worthy cause.
 
•   The underlying confidence game blends in with other activities. It is hidden by various personal and social benefits.
 
•   The remainder of society thinks that the activity is entirely legitimate and respectable.
 
•   The victim can acquire self-esteem and a feeling of importance, by believing he has joined an admired group. The community may give him more recognition.
 
•   The people who run the confidence games are not only well-paid for their efforts, but are respected in the community. Their control of the group of participants gives them power and influence in the society.
 
•   The confidence games can be valuable to the rich and powerful people in society by helping maintain their status quo and their privileges.
 
•   The political and religious leaders do not object to the confidence games and may even promote them.
Companies that are involved in the 'troubled-teen' industry seem to have all of the attributes of an ideal con-game. However, it isn't so much the fraudulent attainment of money that is bothersome so much as the fact that already fragile and hurting children are being used, abused and sometimes killed by these con-artists all in the name of making more-money and obtaining prestige and power.
 
Exposing the Con
"Con-games never remain stationary. The principle is old, but external forms are always changing, for con men know they must adapt their schemes to the times... A good grafter is never satisfied with the form his swindle takes; he studies it constantly to improve it; as he learns more about people, he finds a way to use what he has learned."   From THE BIG CON,  By David Maurer (chapter 3)
FICA|Fight Institutional Child Abuse is dedicated to exposing the con of the 'troubled-teen industry' also known as the 'therapeutic education industry.' The U.S. troubled-teen industry has been around since at least as far back as the 1940's. It has existed in various ways and in various parts of the nation and world. However, now that there is cable television with 24/7 news programming and the internet with loads of information, the con-game has been taken to a whole new level. The marketing for these scams has become easier and farther reaching than ever. Even some British parents have heard of the program and because they love their children, they too are willing to make the huge sacrifices it takes to have a child accepted into one of these programs in America. And sadly, it's all based on a confidence scam.  I originally created this informational web site as a reference for parents. However, as in all con-games, the therapeutic education industry is continually evolving and subject to many variations and refinements,? so I will do my best to continue producing up-to-the-minute reports to continue to update the general public about the twists and turns this particularly harmful con-game takes.  Please check back often for new material, and please contact me if you have any questions or comments.
 
What are the Alternatives?
There are many much better alternatives.
First, parents should realize they will need to have patience and persistence and display unconditional love while helping their child through difficult times.
The next step would be to take the child to an experienced professional with legitimate credentials. Please do in depth background research on any professional you choose to use, also, please be wary of anyone who tells you "Don't sweat staff credentials." Credentials do represent proven, legitimate education and business practices.
The July 2004 document published by the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry entitled, "Where to Find Help for Your Child" expresses the following regarding choosing a mental health professional:
The variety of mental health practitioners can be confusing. There are psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurses, counselors, pastoral counselors and people who call themselves therapists. Few states regulate the practice of psychotherapy, so almost anyone can call herself or himself a "psychotherapist" or a "therapist."
Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist - A child and adolescent psychiatrist is a licensed physician (M.D. or D.O.) who is a fully trained psychiatrist and who has two additional years of advanced training beyond general psychiatry with children, adolescents and families. Child and adolescent psychiatrists who pass Neurology become board certified in child and adolescent psychiatry.  Child and adolescent psychiatrists provide medical/psychiatric evaluation and a full range of treatment interventions for emotional and behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders. As physicians, child and adolescent psychiatrists can provide and monitor medications.
Psychiatrist - a psychiatrist is a physician, a medical doctor, whose education includes a medical degree (M.D. or D.O.) and at least four additional years of study and training. Psychiatrists are licensed by the states as physicians. Psychiatrists who pass the national examination administered by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology become board certified in psychiatry. Psychiatrists provide medical/psychiatric evaluations and treatment for emotional and behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders. As physicians, psychiatrists can prescribe and monitor medications.
Psychologist - Some psychologists possess a master's degree (M.S.) in psychology while others have a doctoral degree (Ph.D. or Ed.D) in clinical, educational, counseling, developmental or research psychology. Psychologists are licensed by most states. Psychologists can also provide psychological evaluations and treatment for emotional and behavioral problems and disorders. Psychologists can also provide psychological testing and assessments.
Social Worker - Some social workers have a bachelor's degree (B.A., B.S.W., or B.S.) however most social workers have earned a master's degree (M.S. or M.S.W.). In most states social workers can take an examination to be licensed as clinical social workers. Social workers provide different forms of psychotherapy.
     Parents should try to find a mental health professional who has advanced training and experience with the evaluation and treatment of children, adolescents, and families. Parents should always ask about the professionals training and experience. However, it is also very important to find a comfortable match between your child, your family and the mental health professional.
Click here to find the above document in its entirety.
The only way to get help for a troubled child is by getting an accurate diagnosis as to what the problem is. When dealing with true mental health professionals this usually includes a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation. (You can find information about this here.)
Next, make sure the methods of treatment are backed by several types of professional research, and studies. Some examples of legitimate treatment methods are cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), and medication therapy to name a few.
No matter how you decide to help your child, please keep him or her at home with you. Home is the safest place for a troubled child and you are your child's best advocate. No one can replace you, the parent.
 
**For more information from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, "Facts for Families" publication click here
 
 
1. Wikipedia. Th Free Encyclopeida. 8 April 2006. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Con_game.
2. "Confidence Game." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Copyright © 2006. 8 April 2006.
3. Wikipedia. Th Free Encyclopeida. 8 April 2006. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Con_game.
4. Ibid.
5. American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. 4th Edition. Copyright © 2000. By Houghton Mifflin Co.
6. The New Book of Knowledge®, Grolier Online. Copyright © 2006 Scholastic Library Publishing, Inc.
7. Wikipedia. The Free Encyclopedia. 8 April 2006. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Con_game.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »