Author Topic: thoughts about hyde  (Read 8807 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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thoughts about hyde
« Reply #45 on: January 23, 2007, 01:43:45 PM »
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...although I don't believe Hyde would ever divulge info given privately, within their confines, to the public. That would be very risky for them to do from a legal perspective.

Risky, my foot.  

In practical terms, there is no way my paltry unemployed status could possibly compete with the deep pockets of their insurance company.  Even my slightly less paltry pockets when I was still employed can't match up.

Hyde has clearly demonstrated, again and again, a flagrant disregard for "legal prudence", even in very recent history.  Look at how they handled the LD problem.  Same way as in years gone by!

Moreover, it has been my PERSONAL EXPERIENCE that they will LIE THROUGH THEIR TEETH when cornered with illegalities on their part. If they can get away with it, they will.  They absolutely do not want to pay any piper.

"TRUTH":  only when convenient, or at someone's else's expense.


Wow, I couldn't have said it any better.  I feel so vindicated by reading about Hyde on this site.  Whoever started this, thank you.  I think that when former students and families look at this site they will have the courage to come forward and post their experiences too.  The word seems to be getting out slowly and as it does I think we will be hearing from a lot more people.  I am sure that the school districts who have approved Hyde Charter Schools do not know about the "real Hyde."

Thanks to everyone who is posting.  It is almost like group therapy, but in a positive way vs the intimidation we felt at Hyde.

One last thing.  In talking to many other students seems as though who stick with Hyde after leaving are those who have deep problems.  One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.  I also remember another family who is deep into Hyde.  The father is a trust fund baby.  I remember him saying that he had no purpose in life as he was very spoiled and didn't work even as a dad.  He didn't know how to put his money to good use. Seems like Hyde grabbed onto this opportunity and my guess is that he now knows what to do with all his money.....give it to Hyde.  They put him on the board of directors.  How sad for this family!
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Offline Ursus

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« Reply #46 on: February 11, 2007, 01:23:50 AM »
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.


It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #47 on: February 11, 2007, 03:22:37 AM »
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.

It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?


Ursus,

I am sympathetic to the idealism of incoming parents. Desperate enough people are ready to believe anything.  The Hyde pitch must be music to their ears.

But what about the idealism of faculty and students? One would think that their idealism would forsake them at the sight of someone being led around campus on a dog leash. (Cf. the thread "Requesting Parents' Assessment of Hyde School," p. 7, posted Mon Jan. 29, 2007, an informative post that describes the collapse of one student's idealism.) And indeed, what degree of  idealism can justify the degradation of humans to animals? If members of the Hyde community, be they faculty, students, or informed parents, remain idealistic after learning of or taking part in something like that, then I find this hard to understand.  

Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2007, 07:23:51 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.

It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?

Ursus,

I am sympathetic to the idealism of incoming parents. Desperate enough people are ready to believe anything.  The Hyde pitch must be music to their ears.

But what about the idealism of faculty and students? One would think that their idealism would forsake them at the sight of someone being led around campus on a dog leash. (Cf. the thread "Requesting Parents' Assessment of Hyde School," p. 7, posted Mon Jan. 29, 2007, an informative post that describes the collapse of one student's idealism.) And indeed, what degree of  idealism can justify the degradation of humans to animals? If members of the Hyde community, be they faculty, students, or informed parents, remain idealistic after learning of or taking part in something like that, then I find this hard to understand.  

Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike


Your comment about how Hyde's pitch is music to some parents' ears is quite accurate.  Hyde thrives on the fact that many parents who enroll there are truly desperate.  Everything else they've tried has not succeeded, failed, or fallen apart.  I have talked to many Hyde parents who felt like they were at the end of their rope.  So, it's absolutely understandable that Hyde's fancy website, print materials, and public relations pitch sounds great.

Then, for many, reality sets in.  They arrive on campus and discover that Hyde is a very different kind of place than they were led to believe.  Some of the faculty and staff are cruel, ill prepared, struggling with their own major issues, unethical, abusive, and classroom instructors with lousy academic records and skills themselves.  Our family was stunned to discover how many inept, inexperienced staff were responsible for our child's well being.  And then there are the seminars and FLCs.  There were some decent moments with kind, concerned parents, and there were also breathtakingly frightening moments with students and parents who fell apart, screamed and yelled, and "lost it."  I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues.  That seems downright criminal to me.  Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues?  These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.  

The feeling I get is that too often Hyde accepts people to fill beds, even though the school is absolutely the wrong place for many of these kids.

And don't get me started on Joe Gauld.  He's the worst public relations nightmare I think I've ever encountered.Y
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2007, 07:42:15 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.

It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?

Ursus,

I am sympathetic to the idealism of incoming parents. Desperate enough people are ready to believe anything.  The Hyde pitch must be music to their ears.

But what about the idealism of faculty and students? One would think that their idealism would forsake them at the sight of someone being led around campus on a dog leash. (Cf. the thread "Requesting Parents' Assessment of Hyde School," p. 7, posted Mon Jan. 29, 2007, an informative post that describes the collapse of one student's idealism.) And indeed, what degree of  idealism can justify the degradation of humans to animals? If members of the Hyde community, be they faculty, students, or informed parents, remain idealistic after learning of or taking part in something like that, then I find this hard to understand.  

Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike

Your comment about how Hyde's pitch is music to some parents' ears is quite accurate.  Hyde thrives on the fact that many parents who enroll there are truly desperate.  Everything else they've tried has not succeeded, failed, or fallen apart.  I have talked to many Hyde parents who felt like they were at the end of their rope.  So, it's absolutely understandable that Hyde's fancy website, print materials, and public relations pitch sounds great.

Then, for many, reality sets in.  They arrive on campus and discover that Hyde is a very different kind of place than they were led to believe.  Some of the faculty and staff are cruel, ill prepared, struggling with their own major issues, unethical, abusive, and classroom instructors with lousy academic records and skills themselves.  Our family was stunned to discover how many inept, inexperienced staff were responsible for our child's well being.  And then there are the seminars and FLCs.  There were some decent moments with kind, concerned parents, and there were also breathtakingly frightening moments with students and parents who fell apart, screamed and yelled, and "lost it."  I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues.  That seems downright criminal to me.  Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues?  These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.  

The feeling I get is that too often Hyde accepts people to fill beds, even though the school is absolutely the wrong place for many of these kids.

And don't get me started on Joe Gauld.  He's the worst public relations nightmare I think I've ever encountered.Y


Well said.  The problem is that unless people like you alert places like the NY School Board, Hyde will continue to thrive.  If you feel strongly that Hyde is a danger, then why not spread the word, especially to potential donors and potential charter schools. I am sure they would be interested in knowing about this site which tells so much about Hyde.
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2007, 08:48:12 AM »
Well said. The problem is that unless people like you alert places like the NY School Board, Hyde will continue to thrive. If you feel strongly that Hyde is a danger, then why not spread the word, especially to potential donors and potential charter schools. I am sure they would be interested in knowing about this site which tells so much about Hyde.


---

I'll say it again: Anyone interested in participting in the article I'm writing at Hyde- anonymously, if necessary- can contact me at:
www.garyeskow.com
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2007, 08:50:00 AM »
I'll say it again: Anyone interested in participting in the article I'm writing at Hyde


Sorry, about Hyde...
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2007, 08:59:46 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.

It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?

Ursus,

I am sympathetic to the idealism of incoming parents. Desperate enough people are ready to believe anything.  The Hyde pitch must be music to their ears.

But what about the idealism of faculty and students? One would think that their idealism would forsake them at the sight of someone being led around campus on a dog leash. (Cf. the thread "Requesting Parents' Assessment of Hyde School," p. 7, posted Mon Jan. 29, 2007, an informative post that describes the collapse of one student's idealism.) And indeed, what degree of  idealism can justify the degradation of humans to animals? If members of the Hyde community, be they faculty, students, or informed parents, remain idealistic after learning of or taking part in something like that, then I find this hard to understand.  

Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike

Your comment about how Hyde's pitch is music to some parents' ears is quite accurate.  Hyde thrives on the fact that many parents who enroll there are truly desperate.  Everything else they've tried has not succeeded, failed, or fallen apart.  I have talked to many Hyde parents who felt like they were at the end of their rope.  So, it's absolutely understandable that Hyde's fancy website, print materials, and public relations pitch sounds great.

Then, for many, reality sets in.  They arrive on campus and discover that Hyde is a very different kind of place than they were led to believe.  Some of the faculty and staff are cruel, ill prepared, struggling with their own major issues, unethical, abusive, and classroom instructors with lousy academic records and skills themselves.  Our family was stunned to discover how many inept, inexperienced staff were responsible for our child's well being.  And then there are the seminars and FLCs.  There were some decent moments with kind, concerned parents, and there were also breathtakingly frightening moments with students and parents who fell apart, screamed and yelled, and "lost it."  I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues.  That seems downright criminal to me.  Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues?  These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.  

The feeling I get is that too often Hyde accepts people to fill beds, even though the school is absolutely the wrong place for many of these kids.

And don't get me started on Joe Gauld.  He's the worst public relations nightmare I think I've ever encountered.Y

Well said.  The problem is that unless people like you alert places like the NY School Board, Hyde will continue to thrive.  If you feel strongly that Hyde is a danger, then why not spread the word, especially to potential donors and potential charter schools. I am sure they would be interested in knowing about this site which tells so much about Hyde.


And, you  not only need to tell the NY School Board (and any other school board where Hyde is spreading its aggressive tentacles), you need to describe your Hyde experiences to:

1.  New England Association of Schools and Colleges: http://www.neasc.org/cis/complaints.PDF

2.  Woodbury Reports and the struggling teens website: http://www.strugglingteens.com/news/let ... index.html

3.  Isac Corp: http://www.isaccorp.org/documentsam.asp#hyde

These are very important outlets and very effective ways to let others know about the Hyde School
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #53 on: February 11, 2007, 11:19:54 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Guest""
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
One friends mom is still involved and she admits that her mom is one of those types that would join a cult if she could.

It does seem that some students that are successful at Hyde but who do not chose to continue their careers at Hyde are vulnerable to transferring their community of choice over to a cult.  I know of a former classmate, considered successful by Hyde standards, who for several years now has been involved with a bonafide RickRoss-recognized cult as their, or one of their, public relations people.  Recently I learned that his sister has also moved there and, if I'm not mistaken, his mother as well (although I am not all that sure about this last one).

I think one of the many reasons we get sucked into Hyde (as opposed to another institution) is that many of us are idealistic people, and Hyde strokes that part of our egos.  Comments, anyone?

Ursus,

I am sympathetic to the idealism of incoming parents. Desperate enough people are ready to believe anything.  The Hyde pitch must be music to their ears.

But what about the idealism of faculty and students? One would think that their idealism would forsake them at the sight of someone being led around campus on a dog leash. (Cf. the thread "Requesting Parents' Assessment of Hyde School," p. 7, posted Mon Jan. 29, 2007, an informative post that describes the collapse of one student's idealism.) And indeed, what degree of  idealism can justify the degradation of humans to animals? If members of the Hyde community, be they faculty, students, or informed parents, remain idealistic after learning of or taking part in something like that, then I find this hard to understand.  

Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike

Your comment about how Hyde's pitch is music to some parents' ears is quite accurate.  Hyde thrives on the fact that many parents who enroll there are truly desperate.  Everything else they've tried has not succeeded, failed, or fallen apart.  I have talked to many Hyde parents who felt like they were at the end of their rope.  So, it's absolutely understandable that Hyde's fancy website, print materials, and public relations pitch sounds great.

Then, for many, reality sets in.  They arrive on campus and discover that Hyde is a very different kind of place than they were led to believe.  Some of the faculty and staff are cruel, ill prepared, struggling with their own major issues, unethical, abusive, and classroom instructors with lousy academic records and skills themselves.  Our family was stunned to discover how many inept, inexperienced staff were responsible for our child's well being.  And then there are the seminars and FLCs.  There were some decent moments with kind, concerned parents, and there were also breathtakingly frightening moments with students and parents who fell apart, screamed and yelled, and "lost it."  I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues.  That seems downright criminal to me.  Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues?  These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.  

The feeling I get is that too often Hyde accepts people to fill beds, even though the school is absolutely the wrong place for many of these kids.

And don't get me started on Joe Gauld.  He's the worst public relations nightmare I think I've ever encountered.Y

Well said.  The problem is that unless people like you alert places like the NY School Board, Hyde will continue to thrive.  If you feel strongly that Hyde is a danger, then why not spread the word, especially to potential donors and potential charter schools. I am sure they would be interested in knowing about this site which tells so much about Hyde.

And, you  not only need to tell the NY School Board (and any other school board where Hyde is spreading its aggressive tentacles), I want you to describe your Hyde experiences to:

1.  New England Association of Schools and Colleges: http://www.neasc.org/cis/complaints.PDF

2.  Woodbury Reports and the struggling teens website: http://www.strugglingteens.com/news/let ... index.html

3.  Isac Corp: http://www.isaccorp.org/documentsam.asp#hyde

These are very important outlets and very effective ways to let others know about the Hyde School


And don't forget Gary Eskow's generous offer to write up a piece about Hyde.  I'd also recommend contacting the child welfare licensing authorities in Maine and Connecticut
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Offline Ursus

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« Reply #54 on: February 11, 2007, 09:24:17 PM »
Quote
I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues. That seems downright criminal to me. Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues? These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.


There have been many identities that Hyde has taken on to market itself, oft times within the same time frame.  Some of these identities could be construed to be at odds with one another.

Ones that I know of:  

In the late 1960's, when Joe was just starting out, he told people to "give me the kids you have the most problems with, the ones you can not teach," as he couldn't get anyone else, being a less than tried commodity (my paraphrase of his quote, which I can't find at the moment).  The school was all boys then, and primarily troublemakers, JuVies, and like-minded malcontents of the rebellious sort.

In the early 70's I think it was, the school went co-ed, and it worked hard to attract the more typical prep school crowd, all the while still enrolling the rebellious trouble makers... At some point just before this period, or perhaps a little earlier, they started really banging the character education gong.  I think that may have always been part of the big-sell, but now it really came to the fore.  (I don't actually truly know this for a fact, but this is the impression I glean from many things overheard plus allusions to said picture from administrator speeches et al in school meetings.).

In the mid to late 1970's, they started calling themselves a "leadership school", and there began a push to "change the face of American education"...  Cliche's such as "America's Spirit" and "national commitment" stem from this time period.

There is a gap in my understanding of how they marketed themselves from the late 1970's to the late 1980's.

In 1989/1990 they started including themselves on Lon Woodbury's Struggling Teens site.  This is an "educational consultant" site aimed primarily at parents at a loss for what to do with their errant offspring.  The first phrase you encounter on the home page is:  "Have the terms At Risk Youth, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Private Military Boarding Schools, Juvenile Boot Camps, Special Education, Teen Help for Depression, Lying and Stealing, Tough Love, Alternative Schools, Troubled Teens, Wilderness Camps, Residential Treatment, Therapeutic Boarding Schools, Educational Consultants or Struggling Teens been used regarding parenting your boy or girl?"  Hyde actively participated in this advertising, as they sent in many an update of information or news, even minutia such as the number of graduates they had for certain years.  The avowed focus of this website "is on residential Emotional Growth (Character) schools and programs that work. This includes short and long term wilderness and outdoor programs, home style programs, highly structured boarding schools, therapy boarding schools, RTCs and psychiatric hospitals for children with behavior and emotional problems."  Basically the gamit of everything on the fornits website, but from a different viewpoint.

There is a gap in my understanding of how they marketed themselves from the late 1990's to the present.

Please note that it is my understanding that they presented themselves differently depending on who they were dealing with.  For example, to one parent they would wear the emotional growth/therapy school hat, to another they would depict themselves as the leadership school with a character ed twist, and both in the same recruiting season.

This dichotomous marketing strategy ends up creating a fractured and confused parent/student community with widely varied goals and needs.  The only entity that does not appear confused in all of this is Hyde, and if you fall in line right behind their footsteps, the Truth will become apparent soon enough.

I think it is important that both students and parents compare notes.  The above historical sequence is incomplete, both as to gaps in certain time periods, as well as in the variety of hues that Hyde has painted itself in per any given time period.  I think it would be great if we all could chip in with our own versions/impressions/understandings of how Hyde sold itself to us or others.

Urs
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #55 on: February 11, 2007, 09:41:14 PM »
Quote from: ""Ursus""
Quote
I was amazed at the stories of kids' (and some parents') psychiatric problems, and I was amazed to discover that Hyde is less than prepared to deal with these issues. That seems downright criminal to me. Why does Hyde accept kids with such serious psychiatric issues? These kids deserve help as much as anyone else, but they should be enrolled in schools designed to deal with their unique issues.

There have been many identities that Hyde has taken on to market itself, oft times within the same time frame.  Some of these identities could be construed to be at odds with one another.

Ones that I know of:  

In the late 1960's, when Joe was just starting out, he told people to "give me the kids you have the most problems with, the ones you can not teach," as he couldn't get anyone else, being a less than tried commodity (my paraphrase of his quote, which I can't find at the moment).  The school was all boys then, and primarily troublemakers, JuVies, and like-minded malcontents of the rebellious sort.

In the early 70's I think it was, the school went co-ed, and it worked hard to attract the more typical prep school crowd, all the while still enrolling the rebellious trouble makers... At some point just before this period, or perhaps a little earlier, they started really banging the character education gong.  I think that may have always been part of the big-sell, but now it really came to the fore.  (I don't actually truly know this for a fact, but this is the impression I glean from many things overheard plus allusions to said picture from administrator speeches et al in school meetings.).

In the mid to late 1970's, they started calling themselves a "leadership school", and there began a push to "change the face of American education"...  Cliche's such as "America's Spirit" and "national commitment" stem from this time period.

There is a gap in my understanding of how they marketed themselves from the late 1970's to the late 1980's.

In 1989/1990 they started including themselves on Lon Woodbury's Struggling Teens site.  This is an "educational consultant" site aimed primarily at parents at a loss for what to do with their errant offspring.  The first phrase you encounter on the home page is:  "Have the terms At Risk Youth, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Private Military Boarding Schools, Juvenile Boot Camps, Special Education, Teen Help for Depression, Lying and Stealing, Tough Love, Alternative Schools, Troubled Teens, Wilderness Camps, Residential Treatment, Therapeutic Boarding Schools, Educational Consultants or Struggling Teens been used regarding parenting your boy or girl?"  Hyde actively participated in this advertising, as they sent in many an update of information or news, even minutia such as the number of graduates they had for certain years.  The avowed focus of this website "is on residential Emotional Growth (Character) schools and programs that work. This includes short and long term wilderness and outdoor programs, home style programs, highly structured boarding schools, therapy boarding schools, RTCs and psychiatric hospitals for children with behavior and emotional problems."  Basically the gamit of everything on the fornits website, but from a different viewpoint.

There is a gap in my understanding of how they marketed themselves from the late 1990's to the present.

Please note that it is my understanding that they presented themselves differently depending on who they were dealing with.  For example, to one parent they would wear the emotional growth/therapy school hat, to another they would depict themselves as the leadership school with a character ed twist, and both in the same recruiting season.

This dichotomous marketing strategy ends up creating a fractured and confused parent/student community with widely varied goals and needs.  The only entity that does not appear confused in all of this is Hyde, and if you fall in line right behind their footsteps, the Truth will become apparent soon enough.

I think it is important that both students and parents compare notes.  The above historical sequence is incomplete, both as to gaps in certain time periods, as well as in the variety of hues that Hyde has painted itself in per any given time period.  I think it would be great if we all could chip in with our own versions/impressions/understandings of how Hyde sold itself to us or others.

Urs


Thanks for the helpful and informative historical journey through Hyde's meandering marketing ploys.  Hyde's history is that of a chamelion.  Hyde is very good at singing the tune that prospective and desperate parents want or need to hear.  As important as what Hyde tells parents is what they DON'T tell parents.  We were given the usual character education speech.  Hyde neglected to tell us a few details:  They didn't tell us that they admit lots of kids with mental health issues but don't have any staff trained to deal with these kids.  They didn't tell us that a bunch of their teachers were mediocre or poor students themselves and don't know how to teach, use poor grammar, and barely know their subject matter. They didn't tell us that academics often tack a back seat, WAY in the back, to things like 2-4 and other counterproductive disciplinary techniques. They didn't tell us that staff sometimes ridicule and demean students and parents.  They didn't tell us that Joe Gauld sometimes screams at students and parents and tries to humiliate them.  The list continues, and it's long..
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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thoughts about hyde
« Reply #56 on: February 17, 2007, 02:41:07 AM »
Quote
Admittedly, the dog collar is an extreme case, and by the summer of 1975 the practice had been abolished. All the same, Hyde provides other opportunities to disabuse us of our idealism. I can certainly think of a few. This is why I have always questioned the emotional well-being of those who remain loyal to Hyde.

Mike


Anyone else remember the signs?  I.e., having to wear a big sign hung around your neck emblazoned with your "sin"?  If I remember correctly, you were not allowed to speak to anyone...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline katfacehead89

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Re: thoughts about hyde
« Reply #57 on: June 11, 2021, 04:41:53 AM »
Joe is an abusive, narcissistic, mediocre cult leader. I dont get why people think hes so amazing. Hes 120% full of absolute crap and rage and predation.