Author Topic: Stanford University Prison Study  (Read 1015 times)

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Offline Jeff_Berryman

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Stanford University Prison Study
« on: January 02, 2006, 11:04:00 AM »
http://www.prisonexp.org/

This psychological study is some fascinating reading.  It should also sound very familiar to a lot of you.
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hen I mount my horse, ALL THE WINDMILLS IN SPAIN TREMBLE!

Offline Anonymous

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Stanford University Prison Study
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2006, 11:10:00 AM »
Thanks Jeff.  I Googled that after hearing about it on an episode of Law & Order.  Interesting.  Has Sue read it?
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Offline try another castle

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Stanford University Prison Study
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2006, 04:13:00 PM »
There's a videotape out there somewhere, and I'm dying to find it.
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Offline Anonymous

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Stanford University Prison Study
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2006, 09:15:00 PM »
There was another study I've read as well, these are great for understanding the behavior of staff.

According tot he other study I read, 1/3 of prison guards will 'be nice' or treat prisoners with respect and dignity, another third will be indifferent, and the final third are sadistic, meaning they use the control over the prisoners for their own amusement and stress relief... and to get their sick jollies off. But... for some reason... humans are just NOT MEANT to have this kind of control over other human beings without turning into monsters. Seems to be a part of our psyche.
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Offline Anonymous

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Stanford University Prison Study
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2006, 01:31:00 PM »
Of equal importance is the reaction of the prisoners, or what we expect from children placed in similar situations in programs.  The prisoners began acting like the criminals they were accused of being, engaging in behaviors very unlike the images of their former selves.  This occured simply by putting them into a fake correctional facility and uniforms.
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Offline Anonymous

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Stanford University Prison Study
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2006, 11:13:00 AM »
Power corrupts.  Absolute power corrupts absolutely.--Lord Acton

Power attracts the corruptible.--Frank Herbert

Julie
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