Author Topic: this made me sad  (Read 1274 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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this made me sad
« on: August 08, 2005, 01:38:00 AM »
http://www.tbfight.com/wwasp/index.php? ... &Itemid=31

for me, one of the worst things about mms was that i had to swallow a lot of bs that i did not believe and follow people i thought were hypocrites just to find my freedom and peace.  reading these stories on Tranquility Bay in Jamaica made me realize that not only is MMS not the only school that makes kids feel that way, but that there are other schools with tons more kids that are being damaged everyday by these faulty institutions.  Maybe they're not all bad, but  the ones that make kids feel like i did and like these kids did are bad and need to be stopped.  seriously, how is ok to mess with a kids spirit and their very being in the name of therapy?
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Offline Anonymous

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this made me sad
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2005, 09:56:00 PM »
Hi all- this made me sad, reminds me of... me ...and many of you too. peace and love to all of u.
http://www.antiwwasp.com/jennifer.htm

You'll never know whats it's like to be taken from your life against your will; to be brainwashed, stripped of your personality only to have it replaced by something that somebody created and placed in your head; to be abused mentally, emotionally, and in many cases physically; to be publicly humiliated and broken. The horror doesn't stop there. I was pulled from the program when I was 17. When I turned 18 I knew my mother could never send me back, and I was like a loose tiger escaped from the circus. I went crazy. I dropped out of school, got in the worst fights of my life with my mother and with random people. I lived on the streets, did more drugs than ever before, and became a dancer to support my new habits. I self destructed and destroyed everything. I know everything I did was my choice. But I believe that it was a direct result of what I had gone through.

These programs are bad for the children, in the long run, bad for the parents, and awful for society. I still don't understand why someone would pay a facility to abuse and neglect their child. It's been hard for me to tell you all of this. It brings on nightmares even now, more than 2 years later. I'm married now and have a family of my own now. I have a beautiful baby girl. On the outside, I look fine. But I still cry in my sleep. I know that these memories will always haunt my life and my dreams. WWASP, if you read this, I want you to know you put me through the worst experience of my life. When I think about my time there, I can't help but to get horribly depressed or intensely angry. In a word: hate. Hate for every minute of everyday that you stole from my life. And every time that I think about your program it makes me sick. You taught me lessons of survival that no child should be forced to learn. You tried to break me but I won. And I will keep winning every time someone reads my story.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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this made me sad
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2005, 10:12:00 PM »
What do the MMS alumni think of one of their own working in the struggling teens business?

Personally?  I think it's tragic.
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Offline Anonymous

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this made me sad
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2005, 02:01:00 AM »
to those of you who think it is "tragic" that fellow alumni are either planning on or are working in environments with struggling teens:

i personally, think it is very fitting.  i myself am working on my drug and alcohol councelling certificate so that i can better a teen's understanding of herself/himself and better help them deal with the troubles of drug and alcohol addictions.  since i have personal experience with this....i believe my experience with my own addictions as well as my experience at mms will only further my understanding of the needs of teenagers struggling with similar issues as i did.  this understanding and experience coupled with the training and education i will recieve make me a great canidate to make a difference in my field.  
it would seem that since most of you who post here, had such a horrible experience at mms...it would give you some comfort to know that there are alumni who are committed to changing things...from the inside.  
i myself had a relatively easy time at mms.  it was helpful, but not a cure.  of course, gary, colleen, john, mike, deb, and all the other are just people; fallible people who don't get it right every time.  i had anger, resentment, and hurt about some of the treatments and methods that they used, but instead of just bitching about the past....i have done something about it- I'VE GOTTEN INVOLVED.  although i don't agree with all their tactics...i think many things about the programs have been proven helpful to most that experienced them.  so, no, i don't think it is "tragic"....i think it is an excellent idea for those of us who have some understanding and who also were not particularly satisfied with the treatment we recieved to get involved ourselves and change things.  please feel free to comment, as i'm sure you will.
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Offline Anonymous

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this made me sad
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2005, 02:02:00 AM »
i wrote above,
 Laura E.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline katfish

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this made me sad
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2005, 11:17:00 AM »
Hey Laura- good luck with that- how wonderful.  I can think of few things more noble than helping out people that are struggling with addiction.

I was wondering- you mentioend you have gotten involved from the inside b/c you felt badly about the way you were treated through MMS methods of treament, etc, are you doing any work that addresses the problematic aspects of their program?  I also wonder, what problems did you have with the porgram and how would you do it differently- how would those new methods be more effective, in your opinion...It's so awesome to hear from someone actually doing this kind of work- or studying to do this kind of work and thier opinions.  Are you planning on doing wilderness stuff?
You mention J and M and the rest-in my opinion, while I think J and M are of course falliable human beings, I personally see them as unwilling to change the tactics which makes their programs difficult to digest for many and people to feel bruised/battered and beaten when they leave- that's my problem in a nutshell.  Their involvement in lobbying and opposing regulation that would prevent abuse of kids and open the doors to public scrutiny I think says it all, IMHO.
Anyway, there is certainly something cathartic about trying to do your part in improving programs or program models- i think that's very very cool and I have a deep respect for what your doing L!  So keep up the good work, L.  I am sure you'll help a lot of people.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead

Offline katfish

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this made me sad
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2005, 06:06:00 PM »
http://www.webdiva.org/straight/


this is a story about a girls whos brother went on to kill himself.  Much of the program, called Straight Inc, was similar to MMS in a few notable ways.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead

Offline katfish

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this made me sad
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2005, 06:19:00 PM »
Origniel post by Debbie on Fornits.
I'm listneing now - its worth pulling up and taking the time to listen.



I'm getting this out late, but you can listen via the archives if you miss the live program.


1. This Thursday Evening, September 09, 2004 @ 5pm Pacific Standard Time: PREMIERE of Family Hub Series - Part 1:
Parental Discretion is Advised.

Topic: Behavior Modification Programs - What you DON'T know!

http://www.worldtalkradio.com/archive.asp?aid=2259

Parents, this is definitely the program for you. Tune in today and find out the truth about what really occurs in behavior modification programs,
boot camps, wilderness camps, and drug rehabs. Can such facilities be considered as cults, and/or involved in cult-like activities?
What ?treatments? are really being offered at these centers? Are your children being ?treated? or ?abused??
Do children commit suicide while / after going through the ?treatments? offered in these programs?

You are invited to join Annie Armen together with special guests Shelby Earnshaw, national director of ISAC Corporation http://www.isaccorp.org
and child advocate Tim Rocha, and UNITED, let's STOP the silence within and STOP the abuse throughout!

This show is sponsored in part by ISAC Corporation.
Check out ISAC's New Company Distinguished Guest Page on Annie Armen Live by visiting http://www.worldtalkradio.com/guests.asp?sid=97.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead