Author Topic: BaBa WaWa's Daughter  (Read 2042 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« on: April 11, 2004, 02:34:00 PM »
Former wild child helps at-risk girls
 advertisement
 
Clarke Canfield
Associated Press
Apr. 11, 2004 12:00 AM


SPRINGFIELD, Maine - It's roughly 500 miles from the bright lights of Times Square to this tiny community in the wilds of Maine, which doesn't have so much as a traffic light. For Jackie Danforth, a former New York City wild child turned entrepreneur, the journey may as well have been to the moon and back.

Danforth, the adopted daughter of TV personality Barbara Walters and the late Broadway producer Lee Guber, has parlayed her experience as a juvenile delinquent into a business: a self-discovery program for troubled girls that combines outdoor living with clinical therapy.

Growing up in the Big Apple, Danforth was surrounded by newsmakers and celebrities. She sat at her mother's side during interviews with Jimmy Carter, Menachem Began, Anwar Sadat. She sat in the lap of Yul Brynner, star of her father's production of The King and I. Carol Channing was like an aunt to her.

Still, Danforth's teenage years turned wild. When she was 14, she would sneak out in fishnet stockings and leather miniskirts to join the famously hedonistic crowd at Studio 54 nightclub. She used methamphetamines and smoked pot, got kicked out of prep school and ran away from home at 15, hitching rides with truckers and ex-cons.

Gangly, freckle-faced and uncomfortable in her 6-foot-tall body, Danforth felt out of place.

"I'm lucky I didn't die," she said.

Her turnaround began after Walters took a firm stand by enrolling her daughter at an alternative school in Idaho, then hiring an ex-Green Beret as an escort to get her there.

Today, the 35-year-old sees to it that troubled teenage girls get the same kind of second chance through her business venture, New Horizons for Young Women.

"The satisfaction I get is knowing that the girls who were similar to me have a place to go where people truly understand," Danforth said.

Walters, who steps down next fall as host of ABC's 20/20, is not surprised at her daughter's chosen path.

"I could understand it because of her own experience and feelings," Walters said in a phone interview from New York.

Danforth, who spent her years after high school bouncing between jobs in Oregon and Washington state, moved to Maine in hopes of becoming a marine biologist.

She enrolled at the University of Maine, but she found being in college in her early 30s held little appeal. It was then, in 2001, that she got the idea to start New Horizons.

"I've always felt I was meant to start something like this," Danforth said.

She bought 308 acres of fields and woods off a deep-rutted dirt road in Springfield and hired a staff, including licensed therapists. Her husband, Mark Danforth, serves as director of operations.

In June 2001, New Horizons welcomed its first girls. The program runs from six to nine weeks at a cost of $20,000 to $30,000 per client.

The girls, ages 13 to 18, wear program-issued clothes and are barred from wearing makeup or jewelry. The uniformity is meant to discourage competition and to encourage self-examination.

Televisions, radios, clocks or watches are not to be found on the property, and mirrors are taboo to discourage vanity. Individual therapy sessions are held twice a week, while groups meet weekly.

In all seasons, the girls hike, canoe and camp. In winter, they spend three days a week in a cabin on the campus; the rest of the time is spent camping on a nearby lake.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2004, 02:17:00 AM »
Wasn't she in her program for upwards of two years?  I guess she found a shorter "quick fix" for six to nine weeks that costs the same as a year in most other places.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2004, 02:51:00 AM »
She attended Rocky mountain Academy 9CdU) in the late eighties. I remember seeing Barbara Walters in Bonners Ferry idaho wheen she was visiting herr daughtter.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2004, 08:01:00 PM »
Has 6-9 weeks ever created a long term positive change?  Maybe in kids that are just beginning to experiment with drugs, sex, feeling their wings, but what about those that have had behavior issues, especially related to ADD, that come away with a new and lasting attitude?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline notworking

  • Posts: 36
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2004, 03:30:00 PM »
So, let's get this straight -- Jackie Danforth is opening a program for troubled teen girls.  She's doing it because she had such a great experience with her therapeutic community/emotional growth school experience.  After all, once she got out, she "bounced between jobs in Oregon and Washington State," then tried going to school to be a marine biologist, but apparently flunked out.  Now, presumably with help from Mom Baba Wawa (because I can't imagine that college dropouts with a crappy job history make all that much money), she's decided to start a school for troubled girls, the basis of which is no mirrors and uniforms.

So, to sum up, this is a woman who has no training in psychology or addiction, other than her own problems.  She is not qualified to teach or practice counseling in any state in the US. She doesn't seem even to have been a parent. Not to mention the fact that she doesn't seem to have the sense God gave a goose, since she thinks that camping four nights a week in MAINE in the WINTER is therapeutic.

Now her famous mommy has set her up in business and I'm supposed to send my troubled kid (if I had one) to her because she's such a frigging expert.  No dear, if I wanted my kid to learn about sneaking out of the house in slutty clothing and sticking anything that would fit up her nose, THEN you'd be an expert.  [ This Message was edited by: notworking on 2004-04-19 12:31 ]
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Oz girl

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1459
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2007, 09:38:44 AM »
I found this article though it is quite old now. it is as if this girl never left RMA. She lived with other students from there and then opened her own program

http://www.educationupdate.com/archives ... tml#letter

 Wilderness Camp Helps Heal
By Pola Rosen, Ed.d.

By the time Jacqueline Danforth, a Dalton student, was fifteen years old, she was into drugs, gangs, and alcohol. It was time for drastic action. Her mother, Barbara Walters, researched different options and Jackie entered the Rocky Mountain Academy, a 3-year degree-granting (high school diploma) wilderness school in Idaho. After 3 and 1/2 years, Jackie graduated with much more than a high school degree. “It was a place where people cared, where people understood and were honest.” Although not agreeing with certain techniques used such as sleep deprivation, the program helped her and others achieve self-esteem and feel good about themselves. Jackie did not return to her home in New York, a place she had not had much happiness. Instead, she lived with older students from the school in Oregon, then Washington state, finally enrolling in a marine biology program at the University of Maine. Feeling uncomfortable and isolated at the age of thirty, in a college community of 18 year-olds, she soon decided to opt for establishing her own wilderness camp for troubled teenage girls, ages 13-17. New Horizons Wilderness Camp, completing its first year, “is an unlocked, nurturing and caring environment,” says Danforth. Her husband, a registered Maine guide, is a vital part of the program. Along with hiking, canoeing, camping and cookouts in summer and snow-shoeing, cross-country skiing and cabin life in winter, the girls get “fresh air, time and peace and the freedom to be yourself for 8 weeks.” Danforth’s message is “It’s you and me; I really want to help you!”

There are 4-5 staff per group of 7 girls, and two therapists to supervise. Group discussions are interwoven throughout the day and may last 1-3 hours depending on the needs of the girls. Danforth feels that computers make kids socially inept. “Kids, especially women, need companionship.”

On a typical day, girls wake at 7 am, wash up, cut and gather wood, cook meals with the staff over a fire, and then do journal writing. They are only allowed to receive letters from home, not phone calls. Danforth explained, phoning can lead to shouting and disruption. The girls then pack up, canoe to the next site and have lunch. After a group session, they set up camp, have dinner and do more journal writing. Reading comes next. Books on hand are, for example, Reviving Ophelia.

The girls work on different values each week. Truth (what is the truth about you?), friendship, forgiveness, transition, acceptance. Each phase deals with them, their families and peers.

Horizons provides excellent food and all clothing. Currently there are 55 girls who are tracked for four years after they leave the program.

Who benefits from this program? Girls who are depressed, mildly self-abusive, have poor body image or are bipolar (who are stabilized on medication). “Borderline personality disorders are tough” said Danforth. “They take a lot of attention, and are disruptive to the point of hurting the others because they want all the attention.”

For suicidal girls we make a contract. She agrees to come and talk to us before she does anything. The contract gives her a measure of control.There are also contracts for self-mutilation and running away. Said Danforth, “We set boundaries; that leads to a set of values and self-respect.”

To the question, what role do you play in the camp, Danforth answered, “A big sister.” She talks to the girls about her own experiences, about adoptive issues and is a resource person who has “been there, done that.” Her vision for the future is to run a school that will be separate from the wilderness program. “It will be a three year program with individual and group therapy. There will be no home visits; the girls will go on expeditions in the first year and gradually taper therapy and include more home visits by the third year. There will be high quality academics and non-competitive sports like yoga, ballet and martial arts.”

The high points of Danforth’s life are the “hugs and embraces whenever a girl leaves and says how wonderful we are and that she wants to come back and work for us.”#
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
n case you\'re worried about what\'s going to become of the younger generation, it\'s going to grow up and start worrying about the younger generation.-Roger Allen

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2007, 10:57:08 AM »
Quote from: ""Guest""
Former wild child helps at-risk girls

 advertisement

 

Clarke Canfield

Associated Press

Apr. 11, 2004 12:00 AM








In June 2001, New Horizons welcomed its first girls. The program runs from six to nine weeks at a cost of $20,000 to $30,000 per client.



The girls, ages 13 to 18, wear program-issued clothes and are barred from wearing makeup or jewelry. The uniformity is meant... to encourage self-examination.



...watches are not to be found on the property, and mirrors are taboo to discourage vanity.

 In WINTER, they spend THREE DAYS A WEEK in a cabin on the campus; the rest of the time is spent CAMPING on a nearby lake.




WARNING BELLS.
(Thought it sounded too good to be true).
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline *

  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2007, 11:02:13 AM »
http://www.daughtersatrisk.com/clinical_model.html

Anyone know the background regarding the "stages of change model?"

Facilitating Change

Parents, families and therapists frequently ask about the model and theoretical perspectives New Horizons uses when working with young women. Although each therapist brings his or her own experience and perspectives to the work, New Horizon's philosophy, programming and overall approach is consistent with a Stages of Change model.

The Stages of Change model is a trans-theoretical model developed by psychologists James Prochaska, PhD and Carlos Diclemente, PhD. It is research-based and used in both medical and mental health programs across the country. All New Horizons staff are trained in this trans-theoretical model and the New Horizons stages (Orientation, Truth, Friendship, Forgiveness & Transition), and assignments associated with each are designed to appropriately assist the students as they move through a process of change.

Prochaska, Norcross & Diclemente (2002) Changing for Good, Quill, publisher.

Prochaska & Diclemente outline six stages that individuals go through when changing behaviors. The same stages have been identified in change behaviors like smoking cessation, weight loss, abstinence and health modifications. Alongside these common stages of change, the authors identify therapeutic techniques that are most helpful during each stage.

New Horizons therapists may use cognitive behavioral techniques, art therapy, psychodrama or skills teaching, depending on where a student is in the change process.

The Stages of Change are



Precontemplative
Contemplative
Preparation
Action
Maintenance & Relapse
Termination

Students most often come to New Horizons in the Precontemplative stage, and the focus of our work is to help them move into Contemplation and Preparation for change. The preparation and early practice of change needs to continue once they leave New Horizons. Going on to therapeutic schools allows many students to continue the work of preparation and action in a supportive environment. Pushing a student too quickly into the action of change before she has fully owned the desire to change for herself can lead to superficial success and/or unsuccessful change.
         Clinical Model
       



Check out our
Parent Workbook
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
eople, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed; never throw out anyone. Remember, if you ever need a helping hand, you will find one at the end of each of your arms.  As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands; one for helping yourself, and the other for helping others. -Audrey Hepburn

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2007, 01:59:17 PM »
Quote
Termination


Oh you got that right. :skull:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 164661
  • Karma: +3/-3
    • View Profile
BaBa WaWa's Daughter
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2007, 12:33:12 PM »
so sad

I hate baba wawa with a passion. I want to boycott all her bullshit ventures
Of course, it's her adopted daughter that was sent away. It's always the adopted ones, and step kids. Adopters and step parents, those are not your real kids. Stop pretending that you love them. You don't! If your not fertile or together enough to generate you own spawn....get a fichus plant, narcissistic twits. Die
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »