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Offline cmack

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Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« on: November 09, 2011, 12:53:32 AM »
I grew up only a couple miles from this place and the brother of a good friend of mine was confined there. From all I could tell there was nothing particularly wrong with him other than he was rebelling against his strict Mormon parents. This was an early wilderness type program similar to Eckerd I believe. They built shelters out in the woods and roughed it, but there was no trekking. My understanding is that the boys accepted there didn't have real psychiatric problems. They were there more because their parents couldn't control them. When the sex scandal broke the local paper ran a picture taken at the facility by one of the adults. It showed a group of 10 to 15 naked boys lying side by side in a line during some kind of ceremony. Their genitals were blurred out in the photo. It was very cultish and creepy.

--------------------------

http://www.nafcj.net/ChronAnneewakee.htm

Poetter OK'd illicit sex, 1970 witness said
BYLINE: By David Corvette Staff Writer
DATE: 10-09-1986
PUBLICATION: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: A/01

Anneewakee founder Louis J. Poetter encouraged sexual relations between staff members and the patients because he believed it was good for the boys, according to a witness in a state hearing 16 years ago.

The testimony was contained in an 800-page transcript of a September 1970 hearing into charges of sexual misconduct at the Douglasville psychiatric facility by a three-member panel of the state Department of Family and Children Services. The transcript was released Wednesday by the state Department of Human Resources.

Among the charges aired during the hearing were allegations by patients and staff members that Poetter engaged in frequent homosexual relations with boys who were patients at the residential facility.

No formal charges were lodged against Poetter as a result of the departmental hearing. But, under an agreement with the state, he was removed as administrator, a job that had placed him in daily contact with the boys, and named executive director.

Poetter, 67, was charged last week with five counts of sexual and physical abuse of former student-patients at Anneewakee. He remained in the Douglas County Jail late Wednesday after waiving a bond hearing earlier in the day.

Poetter testified during the 1970 hearing and called the charges of homosexuality a "damn lie." He said the patients accusing him were the guilty ones.

"I deal with psychotic people," Poetter testified. "I deal with women and girls in my offices, as well as boys, and they do nearly anything when they're working through their problems to try to seduce you into whatever they're doing."

Two students who testified during the hearing first accused Poetter of taking advantage of them sexually but later recanted.

One of the students, who left Anneewakee at the age of 20 in 1966, testified he was hypnotized by Poetter because "this would make it easy for me to relate and what I needed was a homosexual experience with him."

The witness, whose name was blacked out of the transcript along with those of other alleged victims, said he had sex with Poetter once a week for about three years.


When the hearing resumed a few days later, however, he recanted his earlier accusation, saying Poetter had never tried to hypnotize him and "has never done anything against my will."

Psychologists and other staff who worked with Poetter at Anneewakee testified that Poetter encouraged sex between staff members and the boys, as well as participating himself.

Roger Rinn, a counselor and psychology trainee at Anneewakee in the late 1960s, testified Poetter told him that homosexuality was good for the boys, "in particular, homosexuality with staff members, because it got a good relationship with an adult going." When Rinn disagreed with Poetter, "he smiled," Rinn testified.

Poetter said he would hate to forbid sexual relations between staff members and the boys because "it feels so good," Rinn testified.

Roger Rozelle, who was a staff leader at Anneewakee in 1967, testified that Poetter once "tried to kiss me, but I turned my head." Rozelle said Poetter subscribed to a theory that boys "had to have a homosexual experience in order to work through their homosexual fear."

Rozelle said he became involved as a witness in a $1 million civil suit Rinn filed against Poetter and Anneewakee because he was upset by Poetter's treatment of the emotionally disturbed patients there. The suit never came to trial and now is on the dead docket in Douglas County Superior Court.

"They were being entrusted to the care of someone who was entrusted to take care of them. And I felt that there were things that were illegal, immoral and irresponsible going on there," Rozelle testified.

An Anneewakee student identified only as "Buddy" testified that Poetter lured him into a sexual liaison at Poetter's house by promising to set him up with a date with a girl there. Buddy, who was 19 at the time of the hearing, said Poetter fondled him in the shower at Poetter's house.

"So while I was in there taking a shower . . . I was kind of played around with," he testified.

However, Buddy later changed his testimony saying, "I stretched the truth to a great extent there." Buddy told the hearing panel his charges against Poetter were false and said he had been pressured by Rinn to make the accusations.

Other witnesses at the hearing testified that they saw no evidence of improper sexual activity involving Poetter or other members of the staff.

James L. Webb, currently Fulton County solicitor and an assistant solicitor at the time, testified he made an unofficial investigation into the validity of the sex charges and found "absolutely none, or else I am a poor investigator." Webb also said he had been an Anneewakee trustee for several years.

Dr. Juan A. Mascourt, a staff psychiatrist, testified that he "worked closely" with Poetter for six years and that he never had seen anything to indicate any abnormal sexual behavior or other misconduct on his part.

Claude Abercrombie, who was Douglas County sheriff at the time, testified that he had talked to several boys at Anneewakee and "none have ever reported any sexual activityto me or any of my staff that I know of."

John J. Perpall Jr., an Atlanta dentist who said he had known Poetter since 1941, testified Poetter's character was "above reproach," and added that he would have no qualms about sending his own son to Anneewakee.

Fulton County Solicitor, James "Jimmy" L. Webb, a long-time trustee on the board of Anneewake testified as to the validity of the sex charges that he found "abolutely none, or else I am a poor investigator."

Jimmy Webb was instrumental in indicting Wayne Williams as the murderer of Atlanta's Missing & Murdered Children

Robert D'Agostino, Dean of John Marshall School of Law, was a counseler at Anneewakee, who sued Poetter, and tried to expose abuse at Anneewakee in 1969, but Poetter was too rich and powerful to convict.

http://nafcj.org/PoetterDAgostinoLtr.JPG


Chronology of Anneewakee events, 1962-89
BYLINE:
DATE: 03-20-1990
PUBLICATION: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: A/12

- 1962: Louis J. Poetter founds Anneewakee as an adolescent psychiatric care institution specializing in wilderness therapy.

-1970: Poetter is removed as administrator of the facility following a state Department of Human Resources (DHR) investigation of alleged sexual misconduct with male patients. The investigation is not made public, and Poetter remains executive director.

-July 1, 1986: Poetter resigns as Anneewakee board chairman, remains executive director.

-Mid-August 1986: Douglas County Sheriff's Department and GBI begin examining allegations of patient abuse.

-Oct. 1, 1986: Poetter charged by Douglas Sheriff Earl Lee with three counts of sodomy, one count of cruelty to children and one count of simple battery. At the time, Poetter is believed to be in Mexico City. Carl Maxwell Moore, Poetter's chauffeur, is charged with sodomy.

-Oct. 5, 1986: Poetter surrenders to authorities.

-Oct. 6, 1986: DHR begins its Anneewakee investigation.

-Oct. 9, 1986: Six victims of alleged physical and sexual abuse file suit charging facility officials, including Poetter and Moore, with racketeering to defraud and abuse patients.

-Oct. 14, 1986: Douglas deputies arrest James C. Womack, co-director of therapeutic services, and charge him with "numerous counts of sodomy."

-Oct. 17, 1986: Daniel T. Herrera, an Anneewakee employee, charged with cruelty to children. Second group of alleged victims sues.

-Oct. 30, 1986: Poetter charged with stealing $29,500 in Anneewakee funds to buy land for personal use in Mexico.

-Nov. 3, 1986: Robert Lee Winebarger, former group leader, charged with sodomizing young male patient between January 1978 and January 1980.

-Nov. 7, 1986: Nine young women, ages 19 to 24, sue Anneewakee, charging the hospital with racketeering and conspiracy to abuse them sexually and physically, and defraud them financially. Poetter released after five weeks in the Douglas County Jail when friends and supporters raise his $1 million bond.

-Nov. 21, 1986: Twenty-two former Anneewakee patients sue the hospital, naming Poetter, board chairman Jim Parham and other current and former trustees as defendants. This is the fourth suit against the facility and the first to name Parham as a defendant.

-Jan. 25, 1987: Subsidiary of Hospital Corp. of America - HCA Psychiatric Co. -agrees to take over the day-to-day operations of the three Anneewakee facilities. Arrangement prevents the state Department of Human Resources from revoking the facility's license.

-Feb. 27, 1987: Poetter indicted in Douglas County on 22 more sodomy counts dating from 1971.

-March 6, 1987: Poetter, his wife, Mable, and his son-in-law, James Henry Evans, charged with failure to report child abuse. By now, there are 10 criminal defendants in the case.

-March 8, 1987: HCA Psychiatric Co. signs five-year agreement to manage the camps. That same week, the parents of a former patient sue in federal court in Atlanta over dispute in therapy time. Fifth civil action.

-April 8, 1988: Poetter pleads guilty to 19 counts of sodomy with former patients, sentenced to eight years in prison, 12 years probation.

-Oct. 10, 1989: First of six civil trials begins in Fulton County. To date, there are eight lawsuits, 131 plaintiffs and 31 defendants.

-Dec. 19, 1989: After 10-week trial, Fulton Superior Court jury awards $5.2 million to three young women made to work as construction laborers.

Copyright © 2000 The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution

-May 24, 1999:  Poetter Seeks to Overturn Sodomy Conviction in Anneewakee Attacks.  Fulton County Daily Report

http://www.nafcj.net/ChronAnneewakee.htm

-------------------

I found Anneewakee mentioned in passing twice on Fornits. The nurse in the Anderson Boot Camp death was a former employee of Anneewakee's Florida camp.

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=23463&p=286276&hilit=anneewakee#p286276

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=13885&p=179314&hilit=anneewakee#p179314
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Offline cmack

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2011, 12:59:40 AM »
http://rushwho590.tripod.com/anneewakee ... /id15.html

Georgia political ped fest at Anneewakee and beyond


Political Ties - Anneewakee officials, Louis Poetter, Jim Parham and Jimmy Webb, were adept at making friends with Business and political leaders in Georgia and Florida.

But it certainly is unique to have a major political candidate trying to attract votes by highlighting support from a sex offender who needed a presidential pardon to restore his own voting rights.

n      n     David Kline on Jimmy Carter

n      n      

Senator Zell Miller

For more on Zell see:  Zell protects an alleged serial child molester.

Zell appoints D.A., J. Tom Morgan, to chair newly created Statewide Child-Abuse Prevention Panel,
and Leah Sears as Georgia Supreme Court Justice and they all protect above alleged serial child molester.

Zell, a close friend, named Jarvis [subject of several grand jury investigations] in late 1995 to head the Criminal Justice Coordinating Counci and later named Jarvis director of the state Peace Officers Standard and Training Council.  Jarvis  his girlfriend,  Judge Flake, also appointed by Zell to two judicial seats, also protected above alleged serial child molester.

Just to cover his backside, Zell appointed Thurbert Baker as State Attorney General after his buddy, "Honest" Mike Bowers announced his gubernatorial candicy and 10-year affair with Griffen Bell's secretary, a former PlayBoy bunny.  Baker then represented Flake in two separate suits and refused to allow a GBI investigation on the above and below mentioned cases.

Good Old Boy Injustice At Its Best  
http://web.cln.com/archives/atlanta/new ... /anews.htm

[also worked for Governor Jimmy Carter and the notorious racist, Lester Maddox]

Zell helps himself to lottery lobby funds and hosts fundraiser for Clinton.

A Brick Wall, By Stan DeCoster - More Articles, Published on 10/1/2000, Jacquie Glassenberg/The Day, Jeffrey Rubenstein's son, Randy, was abducted by his wife and Faye Yager into the Children of the Underground three years ago. Yager fabricated allegations of abuse by sending Bonnie to a hired-gun psychologist. Despite federal and private investigations, and Faye's enormous political clout with The Clinton Administration and Sen. Zell Miller, no solid leads have emerged on the boy's whereabouts.

A Platform for Pedophiles, 10/30/2000 -- By Judith Reisman, WorldNet Daily

"I'm a warrior in an ancient battle. This campaign is straight out of the Bhagavad-Gita -- the classic battle between materialism and illusion against truth and light." Jeff Gates, Green Party Candidate for U.S. Senate, Creative Loafing 10/28/2000

Former President Jimmy Carter

http://www.metnews.com/articles/affairs091902.htm

Luckily for the folk singer, he had a friend in a very high place. President Jimmy Carter pardoned Yarrow the day before leaving office, thereby protecting the singer from ever having to register as a sex offender.

When Poetter was removed as executive director, then Governor Jimmy Carter  reorganized  the Department of Children and Youth and appointed Jim Parham , a powerful state official, to head the state of Georgia Department of Human Resources in 1971 and who placed in charge of agencies that were supposed to regulate Anneewakee.  He was also placed in charge with Anneewakee's day-to-day operations overseeing Poetter.  In 1972 Parham revamped DHR and the charges dismissed.

According to Douglas County Sheriff Earl Lee, Parham did not cooperate with the criminal investigation of Poetter by denying access to witnesses and documents and refusing to share information with law enforcement.

Parham knew about the allegations as early as 1970 when he testified on Poetter's behalf at a hearing of the State Board for Children and Youth investigating molestation accusations by some patients and counselors. Parham testified  that he had known Poetter for 20 years, beginning when they worked together in the Fulton County Juvenil Court.  Later they often took boys to Mexico on "camping" trips.

The hearing resulted in an agreement that Poertter would be replaced as director and have no direct contact with patienets.  In July 1972 Poetter was again investigated by the newly revamped DFACS of violating the 1970 order.  In 1973 Parham, as Director DHR, helped Poetter get licensed  as a medical hospital enabling him to recieve medical insurance payments and transferring Anneewake from DFACS to a different state agency.

Former Anneewake board member Bete Advani said she reported Poetter's sexual abuse to Parham before and after he bacame chairman in 1986, but he did not report it to the police.

Parham was named as a defendant in two of six lawsuits that were filed against Anneewake and various individuals on behalf of more than 100 former patients.

Parham went to Washington as Carter's personal assistant in 1977 and remained there until 1979, when he accepted a full professorship at the University of Georgia.  Poetter called him again that year and aked him to join the Anneewake Board of Trustees. Parham accepted, joined the Anneewake bord of directors in 1979 and became chairman of Anneewakee's board of trustees in July, 1986.  See Poetter's letter to Carter, page 2.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~gadekalb/parhamtm.txt -- Carter & Anneewakee


Governor Roy Barnes


Excerpts from:  Troubles at Anneewakee: Mental facility for youths faces its adversaries

"the land of the friendly people," as the name translates from Cherokee, is not without adversaries.

Anneewakee and the Douglas County government are fighting in court over whether the facility is the non-profit, charitable hospital it claims to be, and whether it should be exempt from paying property taxes.

Insurance companies have refused to pay on patient policies because they question whether living at campsites in the woods constitutes hospital care. They also say some youths are kept at Anneewakee - which can cost an average of $33,000 a year per patient - longer than is medically necessary.

In addition, some county residents were concerned for their safety after a 13-year-old Florida boy, who had been evaluated but not accepted at Anneewakee, escaped from his Florida caseworker and days later was charged in the March 30 slaying of Douglasville businessman J.D. Hall.

In a presentment last month, a Douglas County grand jury said for the protection of citizens, Anneewakee should find out all information about prospective patients before they come to the county. The grand jury also said Anneewakee authorities should cooperate with the Sheriff' s Department when they know potentially dangerous youths have run away in the county.

In 1982 the Douglas County board of tax assessors revoked the facility's property tax exemption, and Anneewakee has gone to court to get it back.

Anneewakee's attorney, state Sen. Roy Barnes, not only believes the hospital should be exempt from property taxes, but he also is seeking an exemption for a profit-making corporation held by Poetter' s three daughters, two of whom work at the hospital.

The corporation, called Anneewakee Estates Inc., leases hundreds of acres of land to the hospital. Court documents show the hospital paid the Estates some $144,000 in rent in 1982.

In the same year, the hospital paid about $230,000 in salaries to Poetter, his wife, two daughters and two sons-in-law, and the hospital had a surplus of about $2.9 million at year's end, court records show.

O'Neal Dettmering Jr., an attorney for Douglas County, says money Anneewakee makes in donations and by charging an average $92 a day per patient is not used for charity cases, and therefore the hospital should pay taxes.

Anneewakee's articles of incorporation state that "both charity and pay students shall be received, the income from the pay students to be used to extend the charity work." However, court documents indicate that youths who have no funds generally are not admitted.

In his 1983 deposition in the tax case, Oliver Pedigo - Poetter' s son-in-law who does accounting at Anneewakee - answered questions about the hospital's charity:

Dettmering: Do you ever take a patient in that is not able to pay you?

Pedigo: Totally?

Dettmering: Totally. Nothing. You can't get funds for him from anywhere.

Pedigo: No, we've never taken one like that.

'Smoke screen' charged

Pedigo added that about 25 patients received financial aid from the hospital and about 12 were supported by the state at a fee of $74 a day.

Anneewakee attorney Barnes said questions of public charity are "a smoke screen" thrown up by the county to cloud the appeal.

"Public charity has nothing to do with this," he says, adding that Anneewakee should be exempt from paying taxes because it is a non-profit hospital. "We never have said we met the charity" standard for property tax exemption, he says.

At stake in the appeal, which is scheduled to go to trial in August, is at least $275,000 in property taxes from 1982 through 1984, according to Douglas County Tax Commissioner Ann Jones.

The county also wants Anneewakee to pay taxes for seven years prior to 1982, which could add up to another $400,000, said Dettmering.

Aside from the tax case, Anneewakee has wrangled with insurance companies which have refused to pay patient claims.

Last week, Aetna Life Insurance Co. reached an out-of-court settlement with Anneewakee attorney Baxter Davis [see AAML] won four claims - totaling more than $260,000 -that the company had declined to pay.

A main issue in those cases was whether Anneewakee's complete program constitutes hospital treatment, says Aetna attorney Tommy Holland.

"Hospital insurance is designed to cover acute care," he says. "It's hard to understand how (the youths) can be in a hospital when they live in teepees."

Counters Davis, "`Our position is the entire program is a hospital because it is licensed as a hospital. It isn't your traditional hospital where people run around in starched white uniforms, but it works."

In the recent cases, Aetna argued some youths were kept at Anneewakee longer than medically necessary, and the firm supported its contention with an affidavit from a former Anneewakee psychologist, J. Stephen Ziegler.

Ziegler said that Anneewakee's staff members were encouraged to diagnose patients inaccurately to keep them at the facility longer, and were told "the insurance boys need a picture of doom and gloom if we are going to be permitted to keep our patients hospitalized for any length of time."

Davis says he "vehemently disagrees" with Ziegler's statements. "We've got no business having a well kid out there. We've got a waiting list," he says.

Finally, Aetna questioned whether some of Anneewakee's fees are reasonable.

"One of the problems we've discovered is what Anneewakee calls vocational therapy. We think it is also free labor," Holland says, adding that youths who do construction, maintenance and housekeeping at the facility should be paid minimum wage rather than billed for therapy.

Copyright 1985, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, All rights reserved.

Barnes, divorce attorney in Faye Yager's first divorce, the custody case of the century, precurser to the
Children of the Underground, an extortionist ring which profits from the sale and capture of small children.


Fulton County Solicitor Jimmy Webb

Poetter OK'd illicit sex, 1970 witness said
BYLINE: By David Corvette Staff Writer
DATE: 10-09-1986
PUBLICATION: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: A/01

Anneewakee founder Louis J. Poetter encouraged sexual relations between staff members and the patients because he believed it was good for the boys, according to a witness in a state hearing 16 years ago.

The testimony was contained in an 800-page transcript of a September 1970 hearing into charges of sexual misconduct at the Douglasville psychiatric facility by a three-member panel of the state Department of Family and Children Services. The transcript was released Wednesday by the state Department of Human Resources.

Among the charges aired during the hearing were allegations by patients and staff members that Poetter engaged in frequent homosexual relations with boys who were patients at the residential facility.

No formal charges were lodged against Poetter as a result of the departmental hearing. But, under an agreement with the state, he was removed as administrator, a job that had placed him in daily contact with the boys, and named executive director.

Poetter, 67, was charged last week with five counts of sexual and physical abuse of former student-patients at Anneewakee. He remained in the Douglas County Jail late Wednesday after waiving a bond hearing earlier in the day.

Poetter testified during the 1970 hearing and called the charges of homosexuality a "damn lie." He said the patients accusing him were the guilty ones.

"I deal with psychotic people," Poetter testified. "I deal with women and girls in my offices, as well as boys, and they do nearly anything when they're working through their problems to try to seduce you into whatever they're doing."

Two students who testified during the hearing first accused Poetter of taking advantage of them sexually but later recanted.

One of the students, who left Anneewakee at the age of 20 in 1966, testified he was hypnotized by Poetter because "this would make it easy for me to relate and what I needed was a homosexual experience with him."

The witness, whose name was blacked out of the transcript along with those of other alleged victims, said he had sex with Poetter once a week for about three years.

When the hearing resumed a few days later, however, he recanted his earlier accusation, saying Poetter had never tried to hypnotize him and "has never done anything against my will."

Psychologists and other staff who worked with Poetter at Anneewakee testified that Poetter encouraged sex between staff members and the boys, as well as participating himself.

Roger Rinn, a counselor and psychology trainee at Anneewakee in the late 1960s, testified Poetter told him that homosexuality was good for the boys, "in particular, homosexuality with staff members, because it got a good relationship with an adult going." When Rinn disagreed with Poetter, "he smiled," Rinn testified.

Poetter said he would hate to forbid sexual relations between staff members and the boys because "it feels so good," Rinn testified.

Roger Rozelle, who was a staff leader at Anneewakee in 1967, testified that Poetter once "tried to kiss me, but I turned my head." Rozelle said Poetter subscribed to a theory that boys "had to have a homosexual experience in order to work through their homosexual fear."

Rozelle said he became involved as a witness in a $1 million civil suit Rinn filed against Poetter and Anneewakee because he was upset by Poetter's treatment of the emotionally disturbed patients there. The suit never came to trial and now is on the dead docket in Douglas County Superior Court.

"They were being entrusted to the care of someone who was entrusted to take care of them. And I felt that there were things that were illegal, immoral and irresponsible going on there," Rozelle testified.

An Anneewakee student identified only as "Buddy" testified that Poetter lured him into a sexual liaison at Poetter's house by promising to set him up with a date with a girl there. Buddy, who was 19 at the time of the hearing, said Poetter fondled him in the shower at Poetter's house.

"So while I was in there taking a shower . . . I was kind of played around with," he testified.

However, Buddy later changed his testimony saying, "I stretched the truth to a great extent there." Buddy told the hearing panel his charges against Poetter were false and said he had been pressured by Rinn to make the accusations.

Other witnesses at the hearing testified that they saw no evidence of improper sexual activity involving Poetter or other members of the staff.

James L. Webb, currently Fulton County solicitor and an assistant solicitor at the time, testified he made an unofficial investigation into the validity of the sex charges and found "absolutely none, or else I am a poor investigator." Webb also said he had been an Anneewakee trustee for several years.

Dr. Juan A. Mascourt, a staff psychiatrist, testified that he "worked closely" with Poetter for six years and that he never had seen anything to indicate any abnormal sexual behavior or other misconduct on his part.

Claude Abercrombie, who was Douglas County sheriff at the time, testified that he had talked to several boys at Anneewakee and "none have ever reported any sexual activityto me or any of my staff that I know of."

John J. Perpall Jr., an Atlanta dentist who said he had known Poetter since 1941, testified Poetter's character was "above reproach," and added that he would have no qualms about sending his own son to Anneewakee.

Copyright © 2000 The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution

Fulton County Solicitor, James "Jimmy" L. Webb, a long-time trustee on the board of Anneewake testified as to the validity of the sex hcarges that he found "abolutely none, or else I am a poor investigator."

Jimmy Webb was instrumental in indicting Wayne Williams as the murderer of Atlanta's Missing & Murdered Children


Former Georgia Congressman Elliot Hagan

Robert D'Agostino, Dean of John Marshall School of Law, was a counseler at Anneewakee, who sued Poetter, and tried to expose abuse at Anneewakee in 1969, but Poetter was too rich and powerful to convict.

James McKnight, Anneewakee's Carrabelle, Florida adminstrator since 198 told police, and HRS that he and other Anneewakee officials intentionally did not report suspected cases of abuse.

In 1985, A grand jury in Douglas County accused Anneewake of not screening patients well enough, and of failing to protect local residents from potentially dangerous yous.  The findings were precipitated by a slaying on March 30, 1985 of a Douglasville businessman by a 13-year-old Florida boy who had been under Anneewakee's care and was charged with committing the crime.

 DHR, now known as DFACS, to this day dismisses child sexual abuse cases or does not investigate them at all.

*Information compiled from the Florida Democrat, Creative Loafing and Atlanta Journal/Constitution

Chronology of Anneewakee events, 1962-89
BYLINE:
DATE: 03-20-1990
PUBLICATION: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: A/12

- 1962: Louis J. Poetter founds Anneewakee as an adolescent psychiatric care institution specializing in wilderness therapy.

-1970: Poetter is removed as administrator of the facility following a state Department of Human Resources (DHR) investigation of alleged sexual misconduct with male patients. The investigation is not made public, and Poetter remains executive director.

-July 1, 1986: Poetter resigns as Anneewakee board chairman, remains executive director.

-Mid-August 1986: Douglas County Sheriff's Department and GBI begin examining allegations of patient abuse.

-Oct. 1, 1986: Poetter charged by Douglas Sheriff Earl Lee with three counts of sodomy, one count of cruelty to children and one count of simple battery. At the time, Poetter is believed to be in Mexico City. Carl Maxwell Moore, Poetter's chauffeur, is charged with sodomy.

-Oct. 5, 1986: Poetter surrenders to authorities.

-Oct. 6, 1986: DHR begins its Anneewakee investigation.

-Oct. 9, 1986: Six victims of alleged physical and sexual abuse file suit charging facility officials, including Poetter and Moore, with racketeering to defraud and abuse patients.

-Oct. 14, 1986: Douglas deputies arrest James C. Womack, co-director of therapeutic services, and charge him with "numerous counts of sodomy."

-Oct. 17, 1986: Daniel T. Herrera, an Anneewakee employee, charged with cruelty to children. Second group of alleged victims sues.

-Oct. 30, 1986: Poetter charged with stealing $29,500 in Anneewakee funds to buy land for personal use in Mexico.

-Nov. 3, 1986: Robert Lee Winebarger, former group leader, charged with sodomizing young male patient between January 1978 and January 1980.

-Nov. 7, 1986: Nine young women, ages 19 to 24, sue Anneewakee, charging the hospital with racketeering and conspiracy to abuse them sexually and physically, and defraud them financially. Poetter released after five weeks in the Douglas County Jail when friends and supporters raise his $1 million bond.

-Nov. 21, 1986: Twenty-two former Anneewakee patients sue the hospital, naming Poetter, board chairman Jim Parham and other current and former trustees as defendants. This is the fourth suit against the facility and the first to name Parham as a defendant.

-Jan. 25, 1987: Subsidiary of Hospital Corp. of America - HCA Psychiatric Co. -agrees to take over the day-to-day operations of the three Anneewakee facilities. Arrangement prevents the state Department of Human Resources from revoking the facility's license.

-Feb. 27, 1987: Poetter indicted in Douglas County on 22 more sodomy counts dating from 1971.

-March 6, 1987: Poetter, his wife, Mable, and his son-in-law, James Henry Evans, charged with failure to report child abuse. By now, there are 10 criminal defendants in the case.

-March 8, 1987: HCA Psychiatric Co. signs five-year agreement to manage the camps. That same week, the parents of a former patient sue in federal court in Atlanta over dispute in therapy time. Fifth civil action.

-April 8, 1988: Poetter pleads guilty to 19 counts of sodomy with former patients, sentenced to eight years in prison, 12 years probation.

-Oct. 10, 1989: First of six civil trials begins in Fulton County. To date, there are eight lawsuits, 131 plaintiffs and 31 defendants.

-Dec. 19, 1989: After 10-week trial, Fulton Superior Court jury awards $5.2 million to three young women made to work as construction laborers.

Copyright © 2000 The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution

-May 24, 1999:  Poetter Seeks to Overturn Sodomy Conviction in Anneewakee Attacks.  Fulton County Daily Report

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Governor Roy E. Barnes

Roy E. Barnes was born in Mableton, Georgia, and grew up talking politics and selling merchandise at his familys general store nestled between the highway and the railroad tracks in Cobb County. It was there helping customers buy everything from fruit to work boots and swapping stories with neighbors that Barnes developed his business sense and honed his populist touch.

In 1998, Barnes began his second run for Governor, taking his message of education and healthcare reform to the people of Georgia. Though he was outspent two-to-one, Barnes won the election with 53 percent of the vote. On January 11, 1999, he was sworn in as Georgias 80th Governor.

Barnes had two major legislative accomplishments during his first year as governor. He persuaded the Georgia General Assembly to create a transportation superagency, the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority, with broad powers over transportation issues and urban sprawl. He also pushed through major healthcare reform legislation giving Georgians the protections of a Patients Bill of Rights, allowing people to go outside their managed healthcare systems to choose their own doctors, and creating a consumer advocate to fight insurance rate increases.

In his second year, Barnes focused on improving education. The education reform act which he signed into law on April 25, 2000 requires smaller class sizes and more accountability, provides merit pay for teachers and gives parents, teachers, and principals more control over their own schools.

Barnes is a lifelong legislator, lawyer, and businessman.

After law school, Barnes became a prosecutor in the Cobb County district attorneys office.

In 1974, at age 26, Barnes ran successfully for the Georgia Senate, becoming one of the youngest legislators ever elected in Georgia. Within a few years, he was appointed to chair the Senate Judiciary Committee and became the Senate floor leader for then-governor Joe Frank Harris in 1983.

While establishing himself in the Senate, Barnes built a private law practice in Marietta and began raising a family. In 1970, he married Marie Dobbs, his college sweetheart. They have three children: Harlan, Allison Barnes Salter, and Alyssa, a son-in-law John Salter, and a daughter-in-law Amy Crist Barnes, all in their 20s. The family attends the First United Methodist Church of Marietta.

Roy Barnes first ran for Governor in 1990, finishing third in the Democratic primary behind Zell Miller, who went on to win the general election, and Andrew Young. Barnes returned to the Georgia General Assembly in 1993 this time to the House of Representatives.

Barnes graduated from South Cobb High School in 1966, and then enrolled at the University of Georgia. In college, Barnes rebelled against his party roots, joining the Young Republicans in protest of the segregationist statements of some Georgia Democrats. (The corruption of the Nixon Administration later brought Barnes back to the Democratic Party.) He was also a member of the Universitys debate team.

In 1972, Barnes received his law degree, cum laude, also from the University of Georgia, where he was president of the student bar association.

Barnes was born on March 11, 1948 to Agnes and W. C. Barnes.

Since taking office, Barnes personality and politics have won widespread praise. Dick Pettys of the Associated Press wrote that Barnes is "a little bit like Tom Sawyer and a little bit like Clarence Darrow. But mostly, hes like the garrulous neighbor who swaps stories over the backyard fence only funnier." In an editorial, The Marietta Daily Journal wrote, "After they made Roy Barnes, they broke the mold. There just arent many politicians and public servants with his populist touch any more. There arent many who embody the Jeffersonian principle that government officials are the publics servants, not its masters."

http://rushwho590.tripod.com/anneewakee ... /id15.html
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Offline Che Gookin

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2011, 01:02:35 AM »
Yeah that was my first thought.. Eckerd's Program.

I almost went and dug out one of my old work contact lists to see if they were on it, then I kept reading.
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Offline cmack

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2011, 01:07:17 AM »
http://rushwho590.tripod.com/anneewakee ... /id17.html

Information compiled from the Florida Democrat, "Anneewakee A House of Cards" By Albert Oetgen, Creative Loafing "Anneewakee Their Secret Shame" By Moret and Atlanta Journal/Constitution staff writers David Corvette and Charles Walston

Michael Laken, a 23-year-old former patient described Anneewakee as the "Chernobyl" of teen-age therapeutic center because of the "emotional meltdown" patients underwent there.  Laken recalled stories of patients being forced to eat human feces and "run hills all day if Anneewakee policy was not obeyed.

Kim Caspari was married to Jim Caspari a former Anneewakee patient and admitted pal of Doc Poetter.  Kim lost custody of their child to his parents after a Massachusetts judge ruled that she did not adequately protect herself from his abuse while in the presence of their toddler.  Kim reported that he beat her, locked her in closets, forced her to eat feces, replaced apple juice containers in the fridge with urine and hired a cab driver to cruise S. Cobb Drive while he pulverized her face beating her to a pulp and dumping her in a remote, wooded lot.  Jim Caspari is a registered sex offender in Norton, Massachusetts and expressed admiration for Doc Poetter.

Another former pal, William Anthony Lipham, was convicted of malice murder, rape, armed robbery, and burglary in 1987, and sentenced to death for the murder. His death sentence was overturned by the Georgia Supremes.  http://www2.state.ga.us/Courts/Supreme/ ... htm#Powell

"People became human closed-circuit cameras," Laken said "You could either sow the seeds of more rebellion or become someone like 'Doc' Poetter."

Leaning against a wall or picking up a pencil without permission could easily result in another day of E&O, where sparse surroundings were punctuated by sound monitors and watchful eyes.  A patient sent there might be subject to the degrading "green robe" ritual where he was forced to remove all clothing in front of people.  They would watch as he rolled the clothing into a tight bundle before the onlookers threw him a green robe, signifying "scarlet letter" status, to wear for a duration determined by the staff.

Gary Laken concluded that the old program was doomed to failure because it was based "not on conditional love but conditional hatred."


"Its like, 'If you perform this act it's not that I will respect you but I won't hate you," he explains of the old Anneewakee philosophy.

The silver-haired, bespectacled man -- well-trusted as the founder and director of the Anneewakee Therapeutic Center for Troubled Adolescents -- had initiated his slow methodical seduction of the 17-year-old with kissing, hugging and promises of affection.  One of many victims, Gary Succumbed to the sexual advances of the older man, who under the guise of therapy, fed the boy's need for love and affection with a mock substitute.

The hugging and kissing led to fondling and, eventually, repeated acts of sexual abuse.  The manipulation spread like a slow, terminal cancer, as an increasing number of young male patients were drawn into Poetter's web.

For more than two decades, clinical psychologist Louis J. Poetter seduced many of the male teen-age patients who were seeking therapy at Anneewakeee. Eventually, forced by his attorney, to plead guilty to 19 counts of sodomy and one count of simple battery before the case went before a jury and before he completed a plan to murder his accusers, Poetter served an eight-year term and appealed his conviction after the Supremes ruled Georgia's sodomy laws unconstitutional.

In the suit - Brown, et al. vs. Anneewakee [Anneewakee, Inc., Anneewakee Estates and Poetter himself] a record $35 million settlement was reached arising from the sexual abuse and malpractice scandal at Anneewakee psychiatric treatment center for adolescents. [In addition to Carol Brown, et al, v. Anneewakee, Inc. et al. Civil Action No. 144620, Fulton State Court, were William Smith et al. vs. Anneewakee, Inc. Civil Action File No.:  D-36724;  and Becky Stone, et al vs. Anneewakee, Inc. et al. Civil Action File No.:  148018]

Terms of the settlement were sealed, but a source involved in the cases said the agreement allocates $34 million for 110 plaintiffs in eight lawsuits, plus $1 million to create a therapeutic care trust fund for other psychiatric patients who suffer abuse or neglect in mental institutions in Georgia. After the agreement was announced in court, parents, plaintiffs and other participants - some wearing buttons that said, "Please uncover child abuse" - exchanged hugs and handshakes.  Beneath the elation, however, ran an undercurrent of sadness.

"There are no bragging rights to this case," said Randall Blackwood, lead counsel for the plaintiffs.  "Anneewakee represents a chapter in our community' history that should never have been written and should never be repeated."

Co-counsel Patricia S. Edelkind said the lawsuits "helped bring justice to a group of people who had become essentially disenfranchised.  They would have gone unnamed and uncompensated."

For one key participant the settlement was a bittersweet ending to nearly four years of investigation and litigation.

"I feel empty that the true story of what really went on at Anneewakee has not been told, and probably never will be, but it needed to be settled for everyone." said Sarah Tillis, a former Anneewakee trustee who in 1986 alerted authorities to the abuses at the center.

Both sides in the case agreed to split the costs of that trial, estimated to be at least $100,000.  They also will pay $50,000 for two special courtrooms constructed at the Rich's office building downtown, primarily for the Anneewakee trials.

Poetter was cited in Brown vs. Anneewakee as having engaged in exploitative methods to "amass personal wealth, to satisfy his own sexual perversion and to illegally siphon off portions of the huge profits of this "non-profit" corporation to avoid taxes [with the help of his attorney [Governor Roy Barnes] and buy real estate in foreign countries and invest money in foreign banks.

To Poetter's victims, his eight-year sentence for the 19 counts of sodomy is a "slap in the face," when each count carries a 20-year potential sentence, says one former patient.  Poetter's attorney, Robert Fierer, has speculated his client will be a free man in two years -- an average stay for one Anneewakee patient.  "If he is treated like a regular, he'll probably run into some of his victims," a victim surmises, "In his 25th month he'll be f---g kids again."

While Poetter's plea has resolved a few questions in the ongoing Anneewakee saga, shrapnel from the Wreckage left behind by Poetter's physical and mental Abuse continues to infect the lives of many former patients.

*Information compiled from the Florida Democrat, "Anneewakee A House of Cards" By Albert Oetgen, Creative Loafing "Anneewakee Their Secret Shame" By Moret and Atlanta Journal/Constitution staff writers David Corvette and Charles Walston.

For more on Louis Poetters Anneewakee, Psych of Shame, see:  http://nafcj.org/ChronAnneewakee.htm

 

J. Tom, an internationally reknowned child sexual abuse expert, who couldn't race to the door fast enough when introduced to Jeannie Wrightson, after turning a deaf ear that Sheriff Pat Jarvis and Judge Gail Flake had covered-up a serial child molestation case in behalf of child Internet porngrapher, habitual DUI offender, violent batterer and dog biter.  Since J. Tom's appointment, over 800 children died in DFACS custody as covered by AJC staff writer, Jane O. Hansen.

http://rushwho590.tripod.com/anneewakee ... /id17.html
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Offline cmack

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2011, 01:10:39 AM »
Some more relevant links:

A survivor site:

http://anneewakee.org/

From the above page:

Quote
Anneewakee was a residential treatment center for troubled teens that was founded in the early 60s. One of the first and at the time most successful wilderness treatment programs in the country. Anneewakee boasted a better than 80% success rate for the young men and ladies that completed the program.

In its peak, Anneewakee had a campus for boys in Douglasville, GA, a campus for girls near Rockmart, Ga, and another campus for boys near Carabelle, Fla.

Anneewakee closed in the mid 80s amid allegations of Child abuse. With allegations and charges against the founder and many of the staff ranging from sexual abuse of the children, to violations of child labor laws, it became clear that Anneewakee was not the safe, nurturing help for troubled teens that their brochures displayed. Anneewakee's dirty secrets became fodder for local news in the Atlanta area as well as much of the South East, eventually grabbing the attention of national media.

Anneewakee was plagued by the allegations and ultimately criminal charges were filed. Plea bargains were accepted, and some people served time. Anneewakee as a treatment center could not survive the scandals. Licenses were pulled and insurance companies who were a cash cow for the center began refusing to cover the children there. In time Anneewakee was shut down.

So why do we find it necessary to open a web site for Anneewakee? This is not to glorify what happened; this is a place where the former students, many of whom consider themselves survivors can join together.


wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anneewakee ... rbed_Youth

This is the program now:

http://www.youthvillages.org/what-we-do ... ampus.aspx
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Offline cmack

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Poetter v. State
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2011, 01:18:29 AM »
http://www.dailyreportonline.com/opinio ... F18%2F2000

Georgia Court of Appeals       Printer friendly version Print      Email this opinion   Email      Make the text smaller  Make the text larger  Text Size
APPEALS: Mootness

Poetter v. State
A00A0196 (criminal case)
June 29, 2000
MILLER, Judge.
00 FCDR 2956 (08/18/00)
Headnote: The Court of Appeals dismissed Louis J. Poetter's appeal from the transfer of his parole supervision from Gwinnett County to Douglas County as moot, holding that Poetter did not deny that his supervision had already been transferred.

Text: MILLER, Judge.

On April 8, 1988, Louis Jerome Poetter pled guilty to 19 counts of sodomy and one count of simple battery in the Superior Court of Douglas County, for which felony offenses he was sentenced to concurrent twenty-year terms, provided that, after serving eight years, Poetter would be eligible for probation. Effective January 23, 1996, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles ordered that Poetter be paroled "until the expiration of the confinement sentence(s)." Poetter planned to reside in Gwinnett County with his wife, and the Board's order specified that Poetter would be supervised by Parole Officer B. Crosby in Lawrenceville, Georgia. One of the special conditions of the Board's parole order was that Poetter would not return to Douglas County. On April 23, 1999, the Superior Court of Douglas County issued an order under the original indictment number, reciting that the court deemed it "appropriate for the actual supervision of [Poetter] to be maintained by and through the Adult Probation Department of the Department of Corrections in Douglas County," and ordering that Poetter's parole supervision be transferred from Gwinnett County to Douglas County. This order contains the certificate of the Douglas County District Attorney that he mailed a copy of the order to defendant, his counsel, the chiefs of Adult Probation in Gwinnett and Douglas Counties, the clerks of the respective superior courts, and an assistant attorney general.

Poetter's direct appeal to the Georgia Supreme Court was transferred to the Court of Appeals. In three related enumerations of error, Poetter complains of the transfer of his parole supervision from Gwinnett County to Douglas County without notice.

An appellate court may hear and consider evidence outside the record as transmitted from the court below that an appeal has become moot.1 As a friend of the court, the Attorney General submits this appeal is moot because Poetter's probation supervision has already been administratively transferred from Gwinnett County to Douglas County. This finding of fact is made in an order of the Gwinnett Superior Court in Poetter's habeas corpus petition, Civil Action Number 99A3349-5, which order is attached as an exhibit to the Attorney General's brief. Where the appellant either admits the existence of the fact of mootness as claimed by the appellee, or fails to deny the existence of the same, the appeal will be dismissed.2 Poetter has not denied the administrative transfer of his supervision. We therefore conclude the issues raised in this appeal are moot, subjecting Case Number A00A0196 to dismissal under OCGA § 5-6-48 (b) (3).3

Appeal dismissed. Pope, P. J., and Smith, P. J., concur.

1The Atlanta &c. R. Co. v. Blanton, 80 Ga. 563, 565 (1) (6 SE 584) (1888).

2Kappers v. DeKalb Cty. Bd. of Health, 214 Ga. App. 117, 118 (446 SE2d 794) (1994).

3Id.

Trial Judge: Robert J. James, Douglas Superior Court.

Attorneys: Thomas E. Maddox, Jr. (Thomas E. Maddox Jr. PC), Tucker, for appellant. James D. McDade, District Attorney, Douglasville, for appellee. Other party representation: Thurbert E. Baker, Attorney General, Mary B. Westmoreland, Deputy Attorney General, and Paula K. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Atlanta.

Scheduled to publish in the Daily Report on August 18, 2000

http://www.dailyreportonline.com/opinio ... F18%2F2000
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Offline cmack

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2011, 01:21:14 AM »
Another survivor site:

http://www.angelfire.com/sc/comicaze/anneewakee.html

Quote
This page has been set up as an attempt to fill a void in my life. Anneewakee was a residential Treatment center for emotionally disturbed young men which operated in Douglasville , Georgia during the 70's and 80's.The center was the brainchild of Dr. Louis J. Poetter and was set up to give the patients a wilderness living experience while participating in scheduled group, vocational, and educational therapy under the close supervision of psychiatric assistants (or group leaders) as well as a full staff of psychiatric and social workers. The center was eventually closed in the late 80's due to allegations of sexual and physical abuse and forced work imprisonment.It has since re-opened under a different name. If you attended Anneewakee I need not fill in any details for you....your experiences were much the same as mine. During my 4 year stay I developed many friendships with people from all over the country.This was almost inevitable as we lived together 24 hours a day.Unlike most schools which have an across the board graduation, patients at Anneewakee were "terminated" according to their individual treatment plans which made keeping in contact or a reunion almost an impossibillity. I have started this page as an attempt to regain touch with some of those friends I made and discuss and perhaps find closure for many of the things we experienced.Although it is a shot in the dark,I felt I must try something. If you would like to get in touch with some of those "ghosts" from your past , please use this page as a springboard Perhaps we can answer some questions that we all have asked ourselves.Anyone interested can e-mail me below.. I attended @1973-1977.I was S-435.I was in Wawoka as my work group and my school group was Achunda.I went on the Mexico trip and I was at Carrabelle for a brief stint. I look forward to hearing from anyone who stumbles across this page. Thanks, Don Sewell cygnusx1@bellsouth.net and I will send you step by step instructions to walk you through membership to anneewakeedot com or Anneewakee. WE have big plans for the next couple of years and we want you to be a part http://www.mental-health-resources.com/

 


http://www.angelfire.com/sc/comicaze/anneewakee.html
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Offline cmack

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Where did the money go?
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2011, 01:29:50 AM »
http://www.fluther.com/70669/should-i-a ... -savannah/

Savannah College of Art and Design

Quote
Wow. My condolences to you. Let me aquaint you with the people behind SCAD.

Dana Poetter got most of her money (as did the rest of the family) from a supposed 501C3 school that was intended for troubled teens and preteens. That school was called Anneewakee (Cherokee speak for “land of the friendly people”). However, i would be happy to show you where my family paid $93,000 annually for me to be there. And I am certainly far from the only one. Anneewakee had thousands of students. That family, besides escaping paying taxes, got filthy, stinking rich. That’s where the money to start SCAD came from.

It was created and run by Dana’s father, Louis J. “Doc” Poetter. In the mid 1980’s, the sadistic rapes and child abuse that went on since the early 1970’s finally caught up with the lecherous fuck, who was then forced to plead guilty to 17 counts of child molestation and aggravated sexual abuse of a minor.

His wife’s name is Mabel. SHe knew everything that went on, since many of the rapes took place in the home they shared just outside of Anneewakee’s “central campus” in Douglasville, Georgia. You will come to recognize her name because her daughter immortalized this kind and loving “Christian” woman by naming campus buildings after her. Hence, “Mabel Hall” was born. If you loike, I can send you an excerpt from a survivor male child who went there, who also testified in court that Mabel came into the bedrrom while Doc was raping him, but closed the door and walked away. SHe never reported her husband in all those years.

Now, I could provide COUNTLESS links to everything I just told you, but really, why bother? It isn’t likely to change your mind, even though there are a zillion other places you culd go that are much more within your field of graphic design. Any number of technical schoolds can provide you a much more on point education, which would also deny the board members of SCAD (most of which are family members who were more than happy to jump at the chance to make themselves rich off the blood money that Anneewakee generously provided them) of your funds.

But you do as you wish. That family has done everything possible to put thier past behind them. Only 2 of them ever served any time in prison for the crimes they commited against children. I won’t allow this to rest, nor will I allow their victims to be forgotten.

Oh, and you can find hundreds of Anneewakee survivors on various websites, including Yahoo and Facebook. Have a nice day.


http://www.fluther.com/70669/should-i-a ... -savannah/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannah_C ... and_Design

Quote
SCAD was founded in 1978 by Paula S. Wallace, Richard Rowan, May Poetter and Paul Poetter. In 1979, SCAD opened its doors with five trustees, four staff members, seven faculty members, and 71 students. At that time the school offered eight majors. In May 1981, the first graduate received a degree. The following year, the first graduating class received degrees. In 1982 the enrollment grew to more than 500 students, then to 1,000 in 1986, and 2,000 in 1989. In 2010, the university enrolled 10,461 students.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannah_C ... and_Design
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Offline cmack

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2011, 02:42:35 AM »
I couldn't find an obit online, but I believe Poetter died of cancer in 2000.
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Offline Charles

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Re: Anneewakee - The Lost Boys of Georgia
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2011, 03:01:55 AM »
Yes u r right died of cancer in 2010 but so many things are quite unsolved so many things are not here by now so something they described by having guess.........
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