Author Topic: More Trivia  (Read 31938 times)

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Offline rjfro22

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« Reply #120 on: March 09, 2005, 01:50:00 PM »
Korne,
         What part of hollywood did you come from?
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Offline korne

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« Reply #121 on: March 09, 2005, 07:43:00 PM »
I lived at 34th street and thomas street.  I remember when the field behind my neighborhood would  flood, before ty park was a park and we would sniff glue, smoke dope and do acid when I was in high school.  I wish none of that happened, but it did. I take full responsibility and have become quite successful as a business man and as a person.  For some reason, all of this means something to me at this age.  I used to play paddle ball and enjoy the beach.  It was a bad place, but a good place.  I transfereed to Cooper City HS my junior year because my parents divorced and my mom  could not afford our house.  I hated it, but did the best I could.  Hard lessons, but good results.  Thanks to God that I made it.  

I tried for years to live according to everyone else's morality.
I tried to live like everyone else, to be like everyone else.
I said the right things even when I felt and thought quite differently.
And the result is a catastrophe.

---Albert Camus

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Offline cleveland

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« Reply #122 on: March 10, 2005, 09:30:00 AM »
Gotta respond to Thom saying how singing Zippity Doo Dah allowed him to get in touch with his emotions. Cool - I can understand that. But I guess, while the Seed allowed me to challenge the 'group think' of being cool, and having a 'druggie attitude,' I wasn't truly free until I could also question the mindless loyalty to and acceptance of The Seed.

Today, I will sing or listen to whatever song I like - I will sing silly songs and listen to what the Seed called 'druggie music' too. I am free and will question everyone...
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ally Gator

Offline marshall

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« Reply #123 on: March 10, 2005, 09:39:00 AM »
Amen, Wally. :nworthy:
Even 'Don't fear the reaper?'
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Truth, being limitless, unconditioned, unapproachable by any path whatsoever, cannot be organized; nor should any organization be formed to lead or to coerce people along any particular path. You must climb towards the Truth. It cannot be \'stepped down\'

Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #124 on: March 10, 2005, 09:41:00 AM »
Quote
..or something like that.



On the lighter side, I caught a few minutes of the opening of an episode of "The Price is Right" yesterday, and I'm convinced that the concept of  'motivating'  :exclaim: (the act of waving arms wildly, and screaming, jumping up and down, etc.) originated with BOB Barker and that program, NOT ART Barker, and The Seed.






 :grin:  :grin:  :grin:

pretty funny Thom. But of course, you realize we are talking about two entirely different concepts...motivating for cash and prizes, and motivating because if you don't you will be severly punished and must always show that you have assimilated into the group personality.

But funny nevertheless!

 :grin:
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #125 on: March 10, 2005, 09:42:00 AM »
Also, those crazy Straight attendees are just so convinced motivating originated at the Straight. Not so!  It is done in different forms by cults everywhere and was prevelant at our little cult as well. Even Artie boy didn't originate that one....
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Offline GregFL

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« Reply #126 on: March 10, 2005, 09:43:00 AM »
sorry, those both were me, didn't log in.
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Offline GregFL

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« Reply #127 on: March 10, 2005, 09:47:00 AM »
Korne, welcome to our forum!

Most new guys are initiated here by giving us a seed story. Tell us something that sticks in your mind from the day, something that seemed relevant, important, scary, or helpfull. Anything.

thanks!
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Offline GregFL

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« Reply #128 on: March 10, 2005, 02:49:00 PM »
There is some dissention on this board and even a thread of incredulty when it is mentioned that the seed used cultic methods.

Here is an account with my comments in parenthesis of how someone used to be recruited into the moonies back in the seventies. It may have changed or maybe not...

                 ________
Generally, the recruit meets organizational officials over a quiet dinner. Moon is not mentioned, religion is seldom broached. While you eat, you listen to their lectures and prayers and share in their singing, the recruiters constantly smile throughout the encounter. The youth is asked to attend a three-day workshop. (this is the common deceptive recruiting technique, in the seed it was done at the 'intake' and after wearing you down it was suggested to you to  "just sign yourself in for three days and then you can leave if you want).

The first recognition individuals have when arriving for the three day workshops, is that the followers of Moon regard each other as a family....(no comment necessary)

The recruit is not left alone.(right!) As the neighbors of the Moonie encampment in Pope Valley have attested to, they walk in pairs.(YES!) ... It becomes immediately apparent to you that you are not to be left alone and that all 'spiritual children'(or in our case, Seedlings) have someone of their opposite sex(for seedlings, same sex) from the family assigned to them. If you should wander off by yourself, someone will follow you and politely ask you to rejoin the group.(or as the case with the seed, tackle you to the ground and drag you back to the group) You are even escorted to the rest room." (same!)The book continues, "You also learn that there is a rigidly held schedule. There are specific times for eating, exercising, playing, singing, listening to lectures and discussing them.(and no, absolutely no, exceptions to the schedule) You are separated into small groups, led by a team leader who has to have perfect control, not approximate control.(yep!) From the beginning, the leader directs his or her group like a kindergarten teacher, telling you when to do this or that."(and how to talk, what to say and when and how to say it under the threat of punishment).

If the leaders of the group should slacken in their enthusiasm or diligence, they are sternly reprimanded.(in the seed, started over or demoted to junior staff) The recruit is rarely permitted to engage in any casual conversation with anyone.(in the seed, never) They are only allowed to speak about spiritual things(or in our case, seed approved things when called on) within a structured framework. Creativity is frowned upon, conformity is stressed.(and required) "All day you are bombarded by ideas and concepts," (12 hour per day structured groups) states The Puppet Master.(this was a book written on the moonies) "There is little relaxation, and so your resistance is low.(no relaxation at all at the seed). When you refrain from sharing or resist in any way, you are met with benevolent concern.(in the seed, confrontation) Peer approval is an important technique which subtly tells you to conform. The family members aim directly at your most vulnerable points: the need to belong, to feel useful and to feel love.(same as the seed) Throughout the workshop you are flooded with affection, hugs, pats, hand-holding and smiles."(same as the seed, but usually only when you were in compliance)

Recruits react to the regimental control by trying to please.(as a coping method, same in the seed) "But, you quickly learn that the only way to please is to conform,"(completely and absolutely) The Puppet Master states. "You succumb many times to small acts of conformity without realizing it.(yes!) You feel guilty when you hold back, and you are told that wanting to be alone is a symptom of fear and alienation." (being alone is never an option in the seed)It is at this point that the recruit is asked to join the movement.(in the seed, encouraged to 'work his program') The family member who has spent all the time with the specific recruit (oldcomer in the seed) will beg and plead for the recruit to stay.(and "get straight) There will even be tears along with promises. They will continue to implore until you decide to join," (get straight, and if they fail, the seed would assign someone else to work on you)The Puppet Master states.

After joining the Moonies, the recruit will be given about two weeks of adjustment. They call it "losing", a period when the recruit's desires become nothing. Recruits are allowed to return home for one visit (earn the right to speak to your parents at group), but they must be accompanied or tailed by a Moonie. After that one visit, the recruit's communication with his natural family is reduced to mainly correspondence, and that diminishes rapidly.(this is a difference in voluntary cults because the family in essense joins the seed cult with you. If they don't, your contact is severely limited or forbidden as mine was with my mother)  "When you do step out into the world, it is a shock, a cultural shock," states The Puppet Master. "You are taught that everyone not in the movement is under the influence of Satan (or as with the seed..'unaware or druggies') and that you should mistrust them..... no doubt they are trying to take your mind away. You begin to fear the world and those in it. Thus you become dependent on the group for love and positive reinforcement. After alienation is complete, you are told that you can leave if you want."

After the "losing period" the regimentation becomes even more rigid. The recruit is required to adhere to even more demanding workshop schedules. They sleep five or six hours a day.(same in the seed, and studies show teenagers need much more sleep or they cannot function correctly) Their diet consists of starchy foods and low proteins.(early stages of the seed and when there for weekends) Often they fast for many days.(no fasting, but extremely limited proteins and liquids in early stages of the seed) The recruit must now fundraise and recruit others.(absolutely but recruiting was done thru parents in the seed) The recruit must sing and pray before meals, before classes, before work, before evening gatherings. Most songs are traditional or Korean hymns. Alcohol and drugs are forbidden.



 :eek:
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #129 on: March 10, 2005, 10:19:00 PM »
I am around, proud seed graduate entered around 72/73 stayed around for quite a while helping out, spent more than a few nights "guarding" the wharehouse from marauding bands of "druggies". Born & raised in St Pete I see many names I recognize & remember fondly. Dave, Maggie, Tommy, Macky, Jan, Julie, Peggy, Enie, Libby (sp?), Ginger,Arthur, Greg, Debbie, Ron, Mrs Peterman, Married another seed graduate and managed to stay straight until my second year of marriage which ended in divorce. I spent a few more years of additional "research" until I found my way back to AA with the help of my brother (who for a while I did not talk to when I was in high school because I thought he was a "dry druggie") funny how things come back around. I too felt oddly comfortable now working on 14 years (sept 6th) of sobriety. I moved away from St Pete after I graduated JC & went on to finish the last two years of college in Atlanta. I have nothing but great memories of my own "adventures in getting straight" and all the people that helped, hoped, loved & supported me at that time. And it all comes back around now with my oldest who is 19 just droppin out of college & moving in with "the love of her life" who just happens to be a druggie & a theif. I knew I was going to get my come uppance for the hell I put my mom & dad through... it just took a few years. Ain't life grand. I Love You Guys!

Chris Lewis
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Offline GregFL

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« Reply #130 on: March 11, 2005, 11:25:00 AM »
Chris, welcome to our forum.

What school did you go to?

You think you remember me?  I would like to remember you as well, give me some help so I can.

Thanks.
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Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #131 on: March 11, 2005, 06:44:00 PM »
St pete catholic, was there 71-75, Dave Blackwell & Maggie Canfield were the only other "seedlings" there at the time
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Offline Stripe

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« Reply #132 on: March 12, 2005, 12:49:00 PM »
Quote
On 2005-03-10 06:30:00, cleveland wrote:

"Gotta respond to Thom saying how singing Zippity Doo Dah allowed him to get in touch with his emotions. Cool - I can understand that. But I guess, while the Seed allowed me to challenge the 'group think' of being cool, and having a 'druggie attitude,' I wasn't truly free until I could also question the mindless loyalty to and acceptance of The Seed.



Today, I will sing or listen to whatever song I like - I will sing silly songs and listen to what the Seed called 'druggie music' too. I am free and will question everyone..."


I have always thought those infantile songs we were forced to sing so enthusiastically just reinforced the child mentality enforced form the top down that was so pervasive at The Seed.  

What could be more degrading that forcing/allowing those on the program to sing only nursery rhymes?    Most of those songs (the Rubber Tree Plant, Zipidy Doo Dah, the Tea Pot song) I learned in kindergarten through third grade.  I think it was just another form of thought control. Subtlely degrading each of us  because it was the only approved outlet for any creative energy. Franly, I always looked forward to it because it was and acceptable outlet for screaming - ie singing as loud as I could.

Furthermore, remember how only certain persons (staff members or other favored indivudlas) were allowed to sing other, non-nursery rhyme songs?  Like when could an oldcomer not graduated or an at home person on 10 to 10, ever suggest that we all sing a current popular song that we all would know?  Never.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
The person who stands up and says, ``This is stupid,\'\' either is asked to `behave\' or, worse, is greeted with a cheerful ``Yes, we know! Isn\'t it terrific ?\'\' -- Frank Zappa

Offline Anonymous

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« Reply #133 on: March 12, 2005, 07:28:00 PM »
I know when I was first at the Seed we sang those children's songs but I enjoyed them.  It was like being a kid again.  Before I came into the Seed I was too cool (or so I thought) to have ever done anything like that.  It was nice to be able to just goof around and have fun.

In the later years we did not sing those kind of songs.  We sang very beautiful songs of which hold some greatl memories for me.  

I am sure there are plenty of you who do not agree but I think it was great for me to learn how to be positive since I was so negative all of my life and saw nothing wrong with having a good additude.  I still think about those things today in my life.
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Offline Thom

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« Reply #134 on: March 16, 2005, 02:39:00 AM »
Quote
On 2005-03-09 10:11:00, GregFL wrote:

"

Thom said...."My emotional, spiritual, and in many respects, mental development were essentially shut down when I joined the ranks of the drug using/authority-hating cult(ure)."

-------------------------------------

Thom, help me here because I am confused. I thought you were a 14 year old child without a drug problem when you went in the seed. Is this wrong? How then did joining the ranks of the non drug using/authoritarian yet authority hating cult(ure) of the seed help anything? You were a child Thom...picture your own son at 14 locked down, isolated, screamed at and forced to sing humiliating childish songs and then ostracised at school for being a part of a weird fringe group. Wish that on him?



And yes, the restriction of freedom along with the singing of child songs is a simple yet effective mind control technique used by cults the world thruout."
Sorry you got confused, Greg. I'll try to type more slowly  ::spam::
Was it zippety do-da or slippery do-do?
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