Author Topic: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation  (Read 3607 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
« on: July 23, 2011, 02:28:00 PM »
Apparently, Hyde School - DC has opted to sever their relationship with the Hyde Foundation. Does anyone know why?

Did someone at the Hyde Foundation step on some DC toes, to the degree that Joe Gauld did a few years ago (at the time calling for or necessitating an apology letter)?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Welcome to Perry Street Prep!
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2011, 11:46:42 AM »
Here's a press release:

-------------- -------------- --------------

Welcome to Perry Street Prep! Hyde Leadership Public Charter School Amends Its Charter to Intensify Focus on Academic Rigor and College Prep

WASHINGTON, July 5, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Hyde Leadership Public Charter School of Washington, DC is now Perry Street Preparatory Public Charter School!  

The new name was announced following a public hearing before the DC Public Charter School Board to consider the school's charter amendment application. PCSB voted to approve the school's revised mission and educational plan at the end of June.

The new name is intended to reflect the college-readiness mission and the location of the school. In January 2011, Hyde Leadership Public Charter School relocated from 101 T St. NE to a newly-renovated, state-of-the-art facility at 1800 Perry Street, NE (site of the former Taft Vocational Center) in the Woodridge community.

Established in 1999 by Hyde Schools' founder, Joseph W. Gauld, the school has grown to become one of the District's largest charter schools, serving more than 700 students, Pre-K-12, from every ward in the city.

For the past three years, a consulting contract with the Hyde Foundation had permitted the school to use the Hyde name and Hyde character education and family renewal programs. The Board of Trustees voted in April to end the school's 12-year relationship with the Hyde Foundation.  

"It is our belief, as the school's trustees, that this decision best supports our heightened focus on academic rigor and college preparation," said Joseph A. Fanone, president of the Board of Trustees.

The mission of Perry Street Prep is to be "a community of diverse learners that builds relationships with families to empower students to become college-ready and to thrive in a global society."

All financial and human resources can now be realigned to implement the charter school's blueprint to provide a 21st century, college preparatory education to each student, Pre-K-12.  

"Schools that simply prepare students to be college-eligible are doing them a disservice. At Perry Street Prep, we plan to use rigorous academic instruction, a safe and secure learning environment and strong family and community relationships to empower our students to be ready to enter to college, ready to succeed in college and ready to thrive in a global society," said Dr. Jo Ann Cason, head of school.

Perry Street Prep has ended its contract with the Hyde Foundation, but not its belief in the importance of character or its belief that schools work best when parents are invested and involved in the educational process.  

The amended charter details how administrators, teachers and staff will immerse all students, Pre-K-12, in a college-bound curriculum and culture. A Parent Academy will help forge strong relationships with parents and guardians by providing activities and opportunities that inform families how to support their children's educational success.  To maintain a positive and safe school culture, faculty, staff and parents will promote the importance of character by emphasizing Respect, Responsibility and Perseverance.

"Our name has changed, but not our commitment to our students and to their families. Perry Street Prep intends to become the city's top college preparatory public charter school. Every student, Pre-K-12, who enters 1800 Perry Street will be placed on a path that prepares them to graduate college and to thrive in a global society," Dr. Cason said.

Perry Street Preparatory Public Charter School (1800 Perry St., NE, Washington, DC 20018) offers a quality college preparatory education to every student, Pre-K through Grade 12. Located in a newly-renovated, high-tech school building, Perry Street Prep is a community of diverse learners that builds relationships with families to empower students to become college-ready and to thrive in a global society. Students who are residents of DC do not pay tuition. For additional information, visit http://www.pspdc.org or call the school at 202.529.4400.

Media Contact:  Holly Cherico
office: 202.551.0804 cell: 202.570.8494
http://www.pspdc.org


Copyright 2011 PR Newswire Association LLC.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Hyde charter school breaks with founder
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2011, 01:23:25 PM »
Geez. Four charters like Hyde-DC and the Hyde Foundation rakes in close to a million for "services." And who says they're not in the charter binnis just to give disenfranchised kids in desperate impoverished neighborhoods a better chance, and strictly out of the goodness in their hearts? :D

-------------- -------------- --------------

Examiner.com

Hyde charter school breaks with founder

Mark Lerner, DC Charter Schools Examiner
June 29, 2011


Bill Turque of the Washington Post wrote a blog post the other day about the decision by the Public Charter School Board Monday night to allow Hyde Public Charter School to end their relationship with the school's foundation, which was charging the charter $233,000 a year for its services. What did these services entail? A program of character development for its students by founder Joseph Gauld, Does this expenditure of public funds for this purpose drive anyone else but me up the wall?  If this type of payment has been going on annually at Hyde it makes me wonder what else is going on out there.

School leadership said they are making the change due to financial concerns and because they want to focus more on academics. Both goals are important. In 2010 reading proficiency at the charter was 36 percent with math at 41 percent. Why didn't someone on the charter board move to close this institution with those test results after being around for 12 years? The school is renaming itself Perry Street Preparatory as recognition of the modification of its mission.

Finally, I'm just wondering why the board had to approve the break with Mr. Gauld. Is this an example of the board extending its authority beyond its legal limits? It appears to me that the school's board could have made this decision on their own. The only thing they needed to go to the PCSB about was the new name.


Copyright Clarity Digital Group LLC d/b/a Examiner.com.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2011, 02:29:47 PM »
Not only are the test scores from Hyde-DC still in the toilet after a dozen years, but all the hoopla about the "100% college admission rate" is effectively only so much pablum in the face of... a 20% college graduation rate.

Of course, Joe Gauld is gonna try to blame all this on Hyde-DC/Perry Street Prep now, despite the fact that the Hyde boarding schools also seem to have this same problem of "college graduation rates." And this despite the fact that the average socio-economic background of the average Hyde boarding school student is significantly less disadvantaged ... than that of the average Hyde-DC/Perry Street Prep student.

:o  Maybe the Hyde School "curriculum" is just not a good choice for those kids planning on furthering their education?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Hyde charter school swaps 'character' for college prep
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2011, 11:57:29 AM »
This piece below comes from the Washington Post blog, D.C. Schools Insider, linked to in Mark Lerner's Examiner.com piece above:

-------------- -------------- --------------

D.C. Schools Insider
Posted at 01:00 PM ET, 06/28/2011

Hyde charter school swaps 'character' for college prep
By Bill Turque

For 12 years, Hyde Leadership Public Charter School has infused its academic program with "character education," stressing attributes such as humility, conscience and honesty. But when school officials came to the D.C. Public Charter School Board Monday night with a proposal to re-focus Hyde's mission, their fidelity to those principles was challenged by parents and at least two board members.

The board voted 5-2 to approve a messy divorce--a decision by Hyde Leadership PCS to end a 12-year affiliation with its founder, Joseph Gauld, a former math teacher whose Maine-based group of schools emphasize character education and family renewal. Hyde Leadership officials told the charter school board that those ideas will remain a part of the pre-K-12 school, but that they wanted to re-focus its mission on academic rigor and college preparation. The school will be re-named Perry Street Preparatory, reflecting the address at its newly-renovated building, the former DCPS Taft Vocational Center on Perry Street N.E.

DC CAS scores, at the school, which serves more than 700 students, have not been good. Reading proficiency was 36 percent in 2010; math was 40 percent. Jo Ann Cason, Hyde's head of school, told the board that fewer than 20 percent of alumni have graduated college, a reflection of the school's emphasis on college eligibility rather than college readiness.

"This is simply unacceptable," Cason said.

Money was also a factor in the split. Hyde Leadership's board of trustees wanted out from under what it said was $233,000 a year in consulting fees and other payments to Gauld's Hyde Foundation.

But a group of parents assailed the trustees' decision, which they said was presented to them this spring as a done deal, without any opportunity for discussion. They said the character development piece of the program, which includes activities that help students confront negative attitudes and poor decision making, was a major reason they were drawn to Hyde.

"I don't understand how this decision can be made without us at the table," said Traci Felder, who added that she and most other parents made their decision to re-enroll without knowing about the shift in mission.

Eileen Harrington, a member of the board of trustees, said the decisions that led to the split with the Hyde Foundation went to "our fiduciary responsibilities and were not ones of the sort you put out for a vote."

Gauld, who opened his first school in 1966, said the split culminated a long dispute over the quality of the school. In an interview after the hearing, he said that he had delivered an "ultimatum" to the trustees, demanding that they submit to an in-depth evaluation by the Hyde Foundation or risk losing the Hyde name.

Charter board vice chairman Skip McKoy said the lack of transparency on the part of the trustees concerned him, and that what he saw was "not an open and honest process."

But board member Will Marshall, reflecting the majority view, said the board was there to judge academic results, not process. The board voted 5-2 to approve the change in the school's charter, with McKoy and Darren Woodruff opposing.

By Bill Turque  |  01:00 PM ET, 06/28/2011


2011 The Washington Post Company
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline momanddad

  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2011, 10:22:34 PM »
Yet another audience has concluded that it's a serious mistake to affiliate with Hyde.  Close observers learn that Hyde is a terribly flawed enterprise with a very troubling track record.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2011, 02:46:30 PM »
Quote from: "momanddad"
Yet another audience has concluded that it's a serious mistake to affiliate with Hyde. Close observers learn that Hyde is a terribly flawed enterprise with a very troubling track record.
I'm not sure just how great an ideological rift this represents. It may be less than it seems. Only time will tell... Perhaps the straw that broke the camel's back was nothing more profound than the yearly $233,000 drain on the school coffers.

At any rate, it's interesting, in retrospect, that it came just half a year after Hyde-DC moved to their new digs. Here's a piece from Malcolm's blog regarding that move:

-------------- -------------- --------------

Hyde-DC Gets New Home
December 20, 2010 | By Malcolm Gauld | Blogs, Malcolm's Blog

Last Friday (12/17/10) my father and I caught the 6:05 (AM!) AirTran out of Portland for BWI where we rented a car and drove to 1800 Perry Street NE Washington to celebrate the opening of a new home for The Hyde Leadership Public Charter School. What a facility!

Since its founding in 1999, Hyde-DC has grown to enroll nearly 800 students, making it one of the largest, if not the largest, charter schools in The District.  Throughout its existence, the school has labored to make do with an inadequate facility: overcrowded classrooms, sub-standard labs, dungeon-like assembly hall, no athletic fields, tiny gym (the school has never hosted a home basketball game), etc.

The new facility, one of the largest in DC, features 180K square feet of fully renovated space renovated to the tune of $18M. Once the home of Taft Junior High School, "It looks," as my father noted during his remarks, "like somebody waved a magic wand throughout the whole place." As one DC public school official remarked, "Hyde-DC is now home to perhaps the finest science labs of any public school in Washington." What's more, the sparkling gym will host visiting SEED Charter School for a basketball game after the holiday break.

While I have always subscribed to the notion of "marble teaching in wooden halls," anyone who attended the ceremony could feel the lifting of spirit that the new facility has inspired within the students and faculty. Of course, now it's up to them to act in a manner that is consistent with the upgrade. I'm delighted that they have the chance to show what they can do.

Onward,  Malcolm Gauld


Joe Gauld Cuts The Ribbon at Hyde-DC


2011 Hyde Schools
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline momanddad

  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2011, 06:12:55 PM »
Hyde administrators have turned hypocrisy into a fine art.  Countless times, we've observed Hyde rhetoric about character and virtue belied by Hyde staffers' actions.  Throughout Hyde's complex history, the school has been filled with painful contradictions.  Too often, Hyde administrators and faculty have been caught in a web of ruthless, brutal treatment of students, arrogant paternalism, ethical misconduct, and self-serving verbiage. Yes, Hyde has had some good people in its midst, but they've been stained by the Hyde groupies that have sullied it.  Keen observers see Hyde for what it is.  Sadly, too many desperate and vulnerable parents and students head to Hyde with little knowledge of what awaits them.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Hyde School's fine art of hypocrisy
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2011, 02:35:58 PM »
Quote from: "momanddad"
Hyde administrators have turned hypocrisy into a fine art.  Countless times, we've observed Hyde rhetoric about character and virtue belied by Hyde staffers' actions.  Throughout Hyde's complex history, the school has been filled with painful contradictions.  Too often, Hyde administrators and faculty have been caught in a web of ruthless, brutal treatment of students, arrogant paternalism, ethical misconduct, and self-serving verbiage. Yes, Hyde has had some good people in its midst, but they've been stained by the Hyde groupies that have sullied it.  Keen observers see Hyde for what it is.  Sadly, too many desperate and vulnerable parents and students head to Hyde with little knowledge of what awaits them.
I couldn't agree more. People could be making a big mistake ... if they think they can learn anything about character from the self-described "character development experts." Imo, and in my experience, of course! I'm sure that some enthusiasts feel differently.

Differences of opinion aside for the moment... I gotta say... the extraordinary lack of accountability and concern on Hyde's part for the unequivocal abuse and harm done over the years... is a bit surreal. Realistically, just how much, and exactly what, can ya learn about "integrity" ... from folks who can't even step up to the plate on their own accounts, who obfuscate and lie about such things?

I will say this for them, however... Hyde sure does know how to spend a lot of money on marketing and public relations!  :D
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
-------------- -------------- --------------

Offline Ursus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8989
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Hyde-DC Gets New Home
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2011, 02:10:03 PM »
  • While I have always subscribed to the notion of "marble teaching in wooden halls," anyone who attended the ceremony could feel the lifting of spirit that the new facility has inspired within the students and faculty...
Oddly enough, or not, the only folk who appear uplifted or even overtly smiling in the accompanying photo are... the old white farts:


    Joe Gauld Cuts The Ribbon at Hyde-DC[/list][/list]
    Maybe the DC folk were just trying to get through it all, having already been through... more than enough!


    • ...Of course, now it's up to them to act in a manner that is consistent with the upgrade.
    Geezzz. Although a typically sanctimonious remark by Malcolm, it seems the DC folk did just that: they voted for a people's right to self determination. Amen.

     :cheers:
    « Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
    -------------- -------------- --------------

    Offline Ursus

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 8989
    • Karma: +2/-0
      • View Profile
    11 new charter schools set to open
    « Reply #10 on: October 29, 2011, 07:30:34 PM »
    Found an old newspaper article which announced their original opening a dozen years ago as Hyde Leadership Public Charter School; colored emphasis added:

    -------------- -------------- --------------

    The Common Denominator - Washington's Independent Hometown Newspaper
    11 new charter schools set to open

    (Published August 23, 1999)

    In addition to the 146 traditional D.C. public schools opening Aug. 30, 11 new public charter schools will open their doors by early September. That will bring to 30 the number of charter schools operating in the District.

    Charter schools operate with public funds but have greater flexibility in curriculum, structure and staffing than traditional schools. Charter schools are chartered and monitored by the D.C. Public Charter School Board or the D.C. Board of Education.

    Chartered by the D.C. Public Charter School Board:

    Edison-Friendship Public Charter Schools will open a middle school Sept. 13 at the Blow-Pierce Campus, 725 19th St. NE, for 800 students in grades 6-8. The school is organized so that teachers stay with the same students for several years. Families of students older than second grade are lent a computer for use at home. Curriculum is college preparatory. Vonelle Middleton, who formerly led a new high-tech vocational public high school in St. Louis, will serve as principal. Edison-Friendship currently operates two schools for grades K-5: the Chamberlain campus at 1345 Potomac Ave. SW and the Woodridge campus at 2959 Carleton Ave. NE. Organizers plan to open a high school on the same model in Sept. 2000. The schools were founded by Friendship House, a nonprofit human services provider in the District and The Edison Project, a for-profit education management firm based in New York.

    Marriott Hospitality Public Charter High School, founded with corporate support from the Marriott Corp. and other major hotel companies, will open Sept. 7 at 410 Eighth St. NW for 100 students in grades 9 and 10. The school aims to prepare students for careers in the food service, restaurant and hotel industries, including a basic four-year academic program. Flossie Johnson, a former longtime D.C. public school teacher, will serve as principal. She previously led the Health and Human Services Academy, a school-within-a-school at Eastern Senior High School. The school is run by a nonprofit foundation created by the D.C. Hotel Association and the Restaurant Association of Greater Washington.

    Robert Louis Johnson Jr. Arts and Technology Academy will open Sept. 8 in Deanwood at the Richardson school building at 53rd and Blaine streets NE for 540 students in grades preK-5. The curriculum emphasizes arts and technology. Students will be grouped by ability, working in small groups or receiving individual attention. Advantage Schools Inc. of Boston will operate and manage the school. Principal Robinette Breedlove of Lanham, Md., has prior experience in starting and running charter schools in urban settings in Pittsburgh and North Carolina. She previously worked for an education management firm. The school was started by parents, teachers and community members from Richardson Elementary School, which was closed three years ago.

    Southeast Academy of Scholastic Excellence will open Sept. 7 at 645 Milwaukee Place SE for 700 students in grades preK-6. The curriculum includes academic, vocational and character-building courses. The school is geared toward Southeast Washington students. Elizabeth Smith, formerly a teacher and counselor at M.M. Washington and Spingarn high schools, will serve as executive director. Ronald Hasty, formerly principal at Kelly Miller, Merritt, Carver and Aton elementary schools, will serve as principal. The school will be managed by the Tesseract Group. The Rev. Vincent Palmer, pastor of Rehoboth Baptist Church in Southeast, is chairman of the board.

    Meridian Public Charter School will open Sept. 7 at 1346 Florida Ave. NE for 100 students in grades preK-3. The school will use a traditional liberal arts curriculum developed by the Calvert School in Baltimore, which includes daily lessons in core knowledge, individual attention and display of student portfolios. Kevin Parson will serve as principal under the oversight of a board of trustees. Parson previously worked as principal at parochial schools in Baltimore. Louis Steadwell, president of the Parent-Teacher Association and a member Local School Restructuring Team at Wilson Senior High School, will serve as chairman of the board.

    Chartered by the D.C. Board of Education:

    Booker T. Washington Public Charter School for Technical Arts will open Sept. 30 at 1348 Florida Ave. NW with a curriculum that focuses on preparation for skilled careers in construction and the building trades. The school offers a day program for students in grades 11 and 12 and an evening program from 4 to 10 p.m. for young adults, ages 18-21, who want to complete their high school education. Programs for adults moving from welfare to work also will be offered. The school was founded by Edward W. Pinkard, whose uncle was a student of Booker T. Washington, the pioneering black American scientist and inventor. Kenneth Green will be principal of the day school. Sheila Bradshaw will be principal of the evening adult education program.

    Hyde Leadership Public Charter School will open Sept. 7 at First and T streets NE in the Langley building for 240 students in grades 7-9. The school features a college preparatory curriculum with emphasis on community service, parent involvement and character education. Private Hyde schools were founded about 30 years ago in Bath, Maine and Woodstock, Conn., by educator Joe Gauld. A third Hyde school, which is public, operates in New Haven, Conn. The D.C. school was founded by the leaders and alumni of those schools. Don MacMillan will serve as principal. He has taught at Hyde schools since 1983, and was associate headmaster for four years at the Maine and Connecticut campuses.

    Ideal Academy Public Charter School will open Sept. 9 at 1501 Gallatin St. NW for 120 students in grades preK-6. The curriculum emphasizes math, science, technology and reading through phonics. The school is an outgrowth of the Academy for Ideal Education, a private school in the District. The school was founded by Paulette Bell-Imani. Carrie Johnson will serve as principal.

    Kwame Nkrumah International Public Charter School is scheduled to open Sept. 7 with a conditional charter in the Rabaut building at Second and Peabody streets NW for 300 students in kindergarten through grade 12. However, the Board of Education has advised school leaders not to open until a full, permanent charter has been issued. The school features a multi-cultural college preparatory curriculum with emphasis on world languages, computer technology and science. Student exchange programs with schools in Africa also are planned. The principal has not yet been named. Yosef Ford, a native Ethiopian and U.S. citizen, a former adjunct professor at Howard University, is head of the academic team. The school was founded by the Tradition and Technology Group, a group of international educators.

    New Vistas Preparatory Public Charter School will open in the Rebaut building at Second and Peabody streets NW for 150 students in grades 7-12. The program is designed to attract low-achieving students and those at risk of dropping out. School-to-work and internship programs will be offered. The school was founded by Mary Jenkins. She did not return calls for comment.

    Roots Public Charter School will open at 15 Kennedy St. NW for 60 students in grades 1-8. The school features an African-centered curriculum with emphasis on character building and social responsibility. The school is an outgrowth of Roots Activity Learning Center, a private elementary school in the District. Founder Bernida Thompson will be principal.


    Copyright 1999, The Common Denomintator
    « Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
    -------------- -------------- --------------

    Offline Ursus

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 8989
    • Karma: +2/-0
      • View Profile
    Re: Hyde-DC splits from the Hyde Foundation
    « Reply #11 on: November 16, 2011, 04:14:22 PM »
    It's amazing how completely, and how speedily, Hyde has erased all traces of their former relationship with the DC folk from their website. This must have been a split with no small amount of acrimony; lol.

    It kinda reminds me of how completely Hyde erased all mention of their "experiment" in Springfield, Mass., back when the "New Leadership Charter School" was no longer held up as the epitome of what Hyde could do in the world of public schools. Unfortunately for Hyde, individual schools *do* like to retain some control over who they hire as teachers.

    Hyde School, of course, prefers to stack the deck, and have as many of their own people in place to ensure that the school stays sufficiently "Hyde-ified." In fact, that term was used in reference to Hyde-DC specifically ... with regard to Hyde's longer range plans for the school, expressed here in James Traub's 2005 article "The Moral Imperative" (Education Next), color emphasis added:

      Joe Gauld, a prophet and evangelizer in the great New England tradition, has always believed that the Hyde model is destined to replace what he sees as a dead-end academic-achievement model. So far, however, Hyde's efforts at self-replication, which Gauld has headed, have been rocky. In the early 1990s, the Hyde team tried and failed to open schools in nearby Gardiner; in Springfield, Massachusetts; and in Baltimore. In several cases, say the Gaulds, they were blocked by hostile teacher unions, since they demanded the right to hire their own faculty. Hyde now enrolls about 1,400 students at its four schools. The New Haven school is widely considered successful, but the Hyde content has drained out of it almost altogether.
    Only in D.C. can one test whether the Hyde model can be applied to a public school rather than to a private residential one and to a school that serves disadvantaged kids rather than financially privileged ones. Most of the seven hundred or so children who attend this K12 institution located in a tough neighborhood in Northeast Washington enter scoring well below their grade level in reading and math; the school is overwhelmingly black and largely poor or working-class. Joanne Goubourn, the headmistress, said that she had had to scuttle certain aspects of Brother's Keeper for fear of ensuing "fights out in the street." She notes that parental involvement is much less than it is at Bath (though still significant by the standards of urban public schools). Goubourn feels that it may take another five years before the school is fully Hyde-ified.[/list][/size]
    Well... those five years were up, and Hyde-DC opted OUT. So much for becoming "fully Hyde-ified"...
    « Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
    -------------- -------------- --------------

    Offline Ursus

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 8989
    • Karma: +2/-0
      • View Profile
    oh, what sticky webs we weave...
    « Reply #12 on: March 16, 2012, 10:05:56 PM »
    Quote from: "Ursus"
    Hyde School, of course, prefers to stack the deck, and have as many of their own people in place to ensure that the school stays sufficiently "Hyde-ified."
    Speaking of stacking the deck and Hyde-ifying the milieu, I wonder if the DC folk at Perry Street Preparatory Academy were or are aware of the fact that one of their former faculty, allegedly the "Director of Programs at [Hyde's] Charter School in Washington, DC" during the period of 2002-2006 (or a part thereof), had previously been involved in a sexual relationship with a student while employed as a "Spanish Teacher, Coach and Dorm Parent" on the Bath (boarding school) campus?

    Isn't employing someone with this type of behavior in their background history kinda against the law for a public school?

    Ya gotta wonder, or at least I do, whether the Hyde Foundation was fully forthright as to the "credentials" of the faculty they pressed upon the DC folk to install in their midst...
    « Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
    -------------- -------------- --------------