Author Topic: Public School and Program Abuse  (Read 14377 times)

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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #30 on: June 20, 2010, 04:21:22 PM »
A Southern California elementary school teacher has been charged with sexually abusing seven female students for more than a decade.

Prosecutors said Friday that 41-year-old Wade Joseph Bughman, who teaches sixth grade at Beardslee Elementary School in Duarte, was charged last week. He's scheduled to be arraigned Monday.

Bughman faces seven felony charges including continuous sexual abuse and forcible rape.
Prosecutors say each of the girls was under the age of 14 at the time of the abuse and one girl was in the second grade. The alleged abuse took place between 1997 and 2010.

Prosecutors have recommended Bughman's bail be set at $2.1 million.

He faces multiple life terms in prison if convicted of all charges.

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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2010, 07:59:30 PM »
Two Glendale teachers could face child-abuse charges following the drowning of an Ironwood High School sophomore during gym class.
Jesus "Jesse" Prado, 16, died last month, two days after a classmate pulled him from a pool.

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A former Quincy Public Schools student teacher arrested in connection with drug and sexual abuse charges will have a jury trial starting Sept. 13.

Frisbie pleaded not guilty May 12 to delivery of a controlled substance, aggravated criminal sexual abuse, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. He posted 10 percent of a $75,000 bond to gain his release two days after his arrest on April 17.

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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2010, 01:03:57 PM »
Bryan C. Pettibone, a 36-year-old science teacher and boys' basketball coach from Central Baldwin Middle School (Baldwin County). Pettibone was arrested in February of 2009 (prior to the adoption of the Fincher Act) and charged with four counts of enticing a child for immoral purposes, one count of attempted sexual abuse, three counts of sexual abuse, and four counts of harassment. His victims ranged from 13 to 14 years of age. Pettibone was subsequently convicted of these charges on May 11, 2010.


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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2010, 06:11:50 PM »
June 16, 2010

A former McNair High School teacher has pleaded guilty to having sex with one of her students.  Oliver pleaded guilty Friday to two counts each of unlawful sex with a minor and oral copulation, according to court records.

The Stockton resident was arrested in February 2009 after a 16-year-old boy's parents learned of the relationship and went to police. The boy had been a student in one of Oliver's sophomore English classes.

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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #34 on: November 01, 2010, 05:18:55 PM »
October 31, 2010

EUGENE, Ore. Police accuse Chad Gerald Schacht, who teaches at a Springfield middle school and coaches at a Eugene high school, of sexually abusing a 15-year-old student .

Schacht, 40, is a teacher at Agnes Stewert Middle School. But it was his activities as a cross country coach at Sheldon High which sparked an investigation by the Violent Crimes Unit of the Eugene Police Department. Staffers at Sheldon received information about the alleged abuse, and reported it to police.

They arrested Schacht at his home and booked him into the Lane County Jail. He is charged with third-degree rape and third-degree sodomy.
Investigators ask that anyone with information about this case, or about other possible transgressions involving Chad Schacht, to call  Detective Dan Braziel at 541-682-5836.

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Offline DannyB II

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #35 on: November 01, 2010, 06:24:06 PM »
CBS news reports....
Treveon Martin, 10, is one of at least 818 Chicago Public School students, since 2003, to allege being battered by a teacher or other staff member.

* CPS Takes Action On Corporal Punishment
(10/7/2008)
* Painful Lessons: Students Face Corporal Punishment
(9/24/2008)

Hundreds of students have allegedly been beaten by teachers, coaches and staff at Chicago Public Schools. 2 Investigator Dave Savini continues his ongoing investigation involving the illegal use corporal punishment.

Treveon Martin, 10, is afraid of a teacher at his school.

"I've seen him hit five of them in the classroom," Martin said.

Martin says he and others have been hit, grabbed and even struck with a belt.

"He's threatened almost all the kids in his classroom," Martin said.

He says it happened at Robert Emmet Academy in November but a Chicago Public School investigator didn't talk to him until last week - 70 days after the case was reported, and not until after we started asking questions.

"He holded my arms and he picked my body up, and then he just slammed me on the desk," Martin said.

An exclusive CBS 2 investigation discovered Treveon Martin is one of at least 818 Chicago Public School students, since 2003, to allege being battered by a teacher or an aide, coach, security guard, or even a principal. In most of those cases - 568 of them - Chicago Public School investigators determined the children were telling the truth.

"I'm thinking that I don't really feel safe," Martin said.

The 2 Investigators found reports of students beaten with broomsticks, whipped with belts, yard sticks, struck with staplers, choked, stomped on and pushed down stairs. One substitute teacher even fractured a student's neck.

But even more alarming, in the vast majority of cases, teachers found guilty were only given a slap on the wrist.

CBS 2 informed former Chicago Public School CEO Arne Duncan of our investigative findings shortly before he was promoted to U.S. Secretary of Education.

"If someone hits a student, they are going to be fired. It's very, very simple," Duncan said.

Before heading to Washington, he vowed to take action.

"Any founded allegation where an adult is hitting a child, hitting a student - they're going to be gone," Duncan said.

But that's not what happened under Duncan's watch. Of the 568 verified cases, only 24 led to termination. Records show one teacher who quote "battered students for several years" was simply given a "warning" by the Board of Education.

And another student was given "100 licks with a belt." The abuse was substantiated, but the records show the teacher was not terminated.

Alderman Pat O'Connor is on the City Council Education Committee. He wants all these cases re-examined including the way Treveon Martin's was handled.

"I'll tell you what it is - it's deplorable," O'Connor said. "I really believe that the Board has dropped the ball in this instance."

He says this information was never brought to the committee's attention until now.

"You rely on them to follow the law, and clearly here, it doesn't appear that they have," O'Connor said.

There is a state law that bans corporal punishment. But as our 2 Investigators first exposed in September - students are being hit by coaches too. Paddles were confiscated, and CBS 2 exposed gym security tape at Simeon Career Academy showing a coach paddling volleyball players reportedly for missing serves.

Martin says the teacher injured him after he got into a scuffle with a classmate over an eraser.

"My back really hurted, and then at the end of the day, I had to go the hospital," Martin said.

His mother, Courtney Smith, says he was taken by ambulance and treated for a contusion on his back. It is children around his age who appear to be most at risk. The 2 Investigators found the students with the most complaints are in kindergarten through 8th grade.

"He doesn't have very much faith in anyone at his school," Smith said.

"He hurt my feelings," Martin said.

So why did it take over two months to look into Martin's case? School officials say it's because they have many cases to investigate. But just a few hours ago, an investigator determined the allegations against the teacher were unfounded. We are also told only two students were interviewed.

Incoming Chicago Public Schools CEO Ron Huberman is troubled by all these cases, including the case of Treveon Martin and promises to further review them, and that includes the process by which they are examined and investigated.

Alderman O'Connor is drafting a resolution and will bring our findings to the attention of the entire City Council this week.

(© MMX, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
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Offline DannyB II

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #36 on: November 01, 2010, 06:27:45 PM »
http://www.care2.com/causes/civil-right ... c-schools/

support civil-rights
Stop Child Abuse In Public Schools
posted by: Jessica Pieklo 297 days ago
Stop Child Abuse In Public Schools

Despite the fact that the use of corporal punishment on students is a violation of international human rights law, a report issued jointly by Human Rights Watch and the ALCU found that corporal punishment is routine in public schools in many parts of the US, and that almost a quarter-of-a-million school children were paddled, thrown to the floor, struck with rulers or other instruments, pinched, and hit as a means of discipline. Of those students subjected to this abuse, a disproportionate amount were students with disabilities, often punished simply for displaying symptoms of that disability.  Examples include students with Tourette syndrome physically punished for exhibiting involuntary tics and students with autism physically punished for repetitive behavior such as rocking.

 Children are protected from the use of corporal punishment in most US juvenile detention centers and mental health facilities, yet twenty states currently permit the use of corporal punishment in public schools.  In states where corporal punishment is allowed, hundreds of school districts make routine use of it.  Under human rights law including the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the UN Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhumane or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, physical force may only be used against students when it is absolutely necessary to protect a child or others, and even then the minimum amount of force for the shortest amount of time must be used.  
Landon K., a six-year-old-boy with autism illustrates that many school districts ignore these mandates.  He was paddled on the buttocks by his assistant principal, described by Landon's mother as a "large man--nearly 300 pounds" for simply shouting in class.  Michelle R., whose son has Tourette syndrome, finally removed her child from school after he was placed in a closet and repeatedly hit for displaying involuntary tics.  The more her son tried to explain that the physical behavior was connected to his disability, the more he was punished for it.  In some cases the punishment was so severe the children were hospitalized, suffering injuries comparable to motorcycle accident victims.
The use of corporal punishment, especially on students with disabilities, can cause permanent physical and mental injury.  Landon K. became terrified of returning to school and began suffering violent outbursts if approached from behind.  Paddling can cause deep bruising, severe muscle injury, hematomas, and hemorrhaging, according to The Society for Adolescent Medicine.  Students subjected to paddling and other physical violence also suffer mental stigma from being abused in front of their classmates.  All this despite the fact that evidence is conclusive that corporal punishment is ineffective in dealing with even extreme behavioral problems in the classroom.

The findings by Human Rights Watch and the ACLU were based on over 200 interviews conducted between December 2007 and June 2009 with experts and individuals directly affected by corporal punishment, including parents, students, teachers, administrators and special education professionals.  It calls for a complete prohibition on the use of corporal punishment against all students in US public schools and offers recommendations to Congress, the Department of Education and local governments, including best practices and a moratorium on corporal punishment against students with disabilities until a full prohibition is achieved.  The United States did take one small step closer to rectifying the situation when it signed the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the most comprehensive international treaty on the rights of persons with disabilities in history.

US federal and state governments can uphold children's rights by banning corporal punishment and implementing positive behavioral supports.  With appropriate funding, training, and support, educators can create and implement discipline systems that respond to the fundamental needs of even the most vulnerable students.  In doing so they can create environments where every student thrives and reaches his or her academic potential--all without raising a single hand in violence.

Read more: education, civil rights, human rights, corporal punishment, public schools
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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2010, 09:53:44 AM »
STOCKTON - Former McNair High teacher Christina Oliver was sentenced to 150 days in San Joaquin County Jail and five years probation for having a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old student nearly two years ago.

Oliver pleaded guilty to four counts of having sex with a minor. Judge Franklin M. Stephenson ruled that she does not have to register as a sex offender.

Oliver, 26, was arrested for having sex with a boy in her sophomore English class in February 2009. She admitted to having several sexual encounters with him before his father informed authorities.

Defense attorney Ralph Cingcon argued successfully Monday that Oliver should not be sentenced to state prison or be required to register as a sex offender, citing reports from medical experts and probation officials that his client "does not have a predisposition to engage in these types of activities."

Cingcon called Oliver's relationship with her student an aberration of her character, citing her résumé of being a college graduate with a master's degree, and that she has been in law school since losing her job as a teacher.

"She has taken responsibility for her actions, and she is openly remorseful," Cingcon said. "She is somebody that can be helped."

Deputy District Attorney Kristine Reed argued that Oliver should be given state prison time. As a teacher, she was in a position of power and trust from the community.

Reed said that while it may not seem to be in character for Oliver to have committed a sex crime, she made multiple impulsive decisions to do so two years ago - and she could do it again.

"If she had done it once and decided to put an end to it after having time to reflect upon that, she would have a better argument," Reed said. "But she didn't. She contacted the plaintiff multiple times, and was on her way to do it again when she was stopped by authorities."

Stephenson said he encourages Oliver's pursuit of a law degree, and ordered her to report to county jail May 16, after the spring semester.


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Offline Troll Control

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2010, 10:06:27 AM »
When I was a senior in HS I had sex many times with my English TA who was a sophomore at Vassar college.  It was great.  Plus we smoked a lot of weed and got drunk quite a bit at her apartment.  Some would call this "abuse," but I would call it "great."
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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #39 on: November 02, 2010, 03:02:40 PM »
October 29,2010

Police have arrested a Lafayette middle school teacher on suspicion of having a sexual relationship with a 14-year-old student and sending her as many as 140 text messages of a sexual nature per day.
Michael Merrick was being held Thursday in county jail on $3.05 million bail.
Police Chief Mike Hubbard said the 47-year-old teacher was arrested Wednesday, two days after the female student made the allegations.
 
 
Merrick is accused of having sexual contact with the student during private tutoring sessions at Stanley Middle School. Lafayette School District Superintendent Fred Brill said Merrick is a wood shop teacher and a youth sports coach who has worked for the district for at least a decade.
It's not known whether he has retained an attorney.

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Offline Anne Bonney

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #40 on: November 02, 2010, 03:13:08 PM »
I'm still not understanding what this has to do with the TTI.  Regular schools, even regular boarding schools are completely different animals from TTIs.
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Offline Samara

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2010, 03:25:07 PM »
And even a hint of abuse stigmatizes the teacher and school forever. TTI's operate more insidiously. The presumption of guilt already on the child. The child is in an insular, threatening environment with no advocacy. Whoot knows this and this is just a tactical thread.
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Offline Whooter

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2010, 03:47:37 PM »
Quote from: "Anne Bonney"
I'm still not understanding what this has to do with the TTI.  Regular schools, even regular boarding schools are completely different animals from TTIs.

Personally I think it can say a lot about the industry.  It can be used as a barometer or insight (window) into the TTI.  We can see how many different ways kids are being taken advantage of by their teachers.  These Public schools use similar screening criteria and back ground checks as some of the programs do.  If too much time goes by and we see all these public schools reporting 100's of abuse cases and we dont see any reports coming out of the TTI then that may tell us something.

Do programs have less problems than public schools?
Or Do they go unreported?
Do they handle it internally with letters to the parents?
Are Programs required to make abuse occurrences public?
Are the kids just afraid to report it?


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Offline Troll Control

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2010, 04:13:49 PM »
So then why is it in the "TTI" forum, gatekeeper?  It should be moved to the OFFA.  

You're right, Anne.  It has nothing to do with the TTI and was posted in the wrong forum.  The mod should move the thread to the appropriate venue and stop trying to stifle debate about the TTI in the TTI forum.
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Offline Shadyacres

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Re: Public School Abuse
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2010, 05:12:06 PM »
Blah, blah, blah.  Unlike Whooter, this thread has nothing to do with the Troubled Teen Industry.  One more attempt to conceal the horrible truth about these places.  My public high school was not abusive, Whooter, though some of the kids and even some of the staff, were.  That is completely different from the institutionalized abuse found in Troubled Teen facilities.  Of course, it was my public high school guidance counselor who suggested the program to my mother, and THAT was VERY abusive.
This forum is entitled "The Troubled Teen Industry", not "Public schools and how Whooter thinks they make programs look good".  Is Danny B the Gatekeeper?
« Last Edit: November 02, 2010, 05:50:59 PM by Shadyacres »