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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2010, 12:51:01 PM »
http://www.metronews.ca/ottawa/canada/a ... ned-to-n-s


Group says troubled teen returned to N.S.

Published: August 24, 2010 8:42 p.m.
Last modified: August 24, 2010 8:47 p.m.[/b]  
               
HALIFAX - A troubled Nova Scotia teen who was being treated for behavioural disorders at a facility in Ontario has been transferred to a facility in his home province, says an advocacy group that has been working with his family.

Roch Longueepee, who leads the group, said they were notified late Tuesday that the 15-year-old had been moved to Nova Scotia.

There was no immediate confirmation from the province.

"We are delighted that the boy is here," Longueepee said in an interview.

"He's back in our territory now and we are going to push harder for a program that we proposed to the province ... because we feel it's going to give him the best life outcome at this stage."

The family, who can't be named to protect the youth's identity, held a news conference earlier in the day and produced a letter from Nova Scotia's Department of Community Services that said their contact with the boy had been suspended on the recommendation of the Ontario facility where he was housed.

The department sent the letter to his grandmother last week arguing that family contact had become an obstacle to the youth's treatment.

The boy has alleged he was abused at an Ontario facility, a claim that is under police investigation.

He has been in the care of the government of Nova Scotia since November 2008, when it was determined he was a threat to himself and the community.

He suffers from various cognitive challenges, but his grandmother and the family's lawyer say there has never been a conclusive diagnosis.

The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia agreed last year that he could be sent away because all local treatment options had been exhausted.

His mother lost custody of him in British Columbia and his father was never in the picture.
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2010, 12:53:30 PM »
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1198583.html


Troubled teen back in Nova Scotia


Grandparents must still fight for contact
By The Canadian Press
Wed, Aug 25 (2010) - 4:53 AM


The grandparents of a troubled Cole Harbour teenager who was being treated for behavioural disorders at a facility in Ontario say he is now in Truro.

"God answers prayers," the 15-year-old boy’s grandmother said Tuesday night.

"We’re overwhelmed that he’s back here in Nova Scotia."

The grandmother and her husband, who cannot be named to protect the teen’s identity, received a letter by courier Tuesday night from the provincial Community Services Department saying their grandson is at a facility in Truro.

The grandparents said they were previously told the boy was to be discharged from the Ontario centre today and they wouldn’t be told where he was going.

They also received another letter from Community Services earlier Tuesday stating that their contact with the boy had been suspended on the recommendation of the Ontario facility. The department argued in the letter, sent last week, that family contact had become an obstacle to the boy’s treatment.

The grandparents are set to go to court Friday to fight that ban, his grandmother said.

The boy has alleged he was abused at the Ontario facility, a claim that is under police investigation.

He has been in the care of the Nova Scotia government since November 2008, when it was determined he was a threat to himself and the community. He suffers from various cognitive challenges, but his grandmother and the family’s lawyer say there has never been a conclusive diagnosis.

Nova Scotia does not have a facility capable of addressing the boy’s needs and the province’s Supreme Court agreed last year that he could be sent away because all local treatment options had been exhausted.

According to an advocacy group working with the family, a team of health-care professionals has been assembled that is willing to help the boy if he were brought home and placed in some sort of foster care.

The boy has been in his grandparents’ care since he was a toddler. His mother lost custody of him in British Columbia and his father was never in the picture.


With Patricia Brooks Arenburg,

staff reporter
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2010, 11:21:54 AM »
A PRESS CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD for the family of a fifteen year old African Canadian youth who was residing in a treatment facility for conduct disordered children in South Eastern Ontario.

The family retained Restoring Dignity to investigate the Nova Scotia Department of Community Services handling of their grandson'...s case. Thursday’s press conference will discuss the current developments on the case and the youth’s return to the province of Nova Scotia.

In attendance will be Mr. Roch Longueépée, Founder & CEO, Restoring Dignity, Dr. Charles Emmerys, with, Dawe, Bates, Parlee & Associates (NB), Mr. Richard Bureau with the firm Morris Bureau, and the Firm Walker Dunlop will also be working with Restoring Dignity in the family's fight to return him to the family home.

WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO ATTEND

Conference location: Westin Nova Scotia, Luneburg Room, Halifax, Nova Scotia, CanadaDate: Thursday August 26, 2010 Time: 12:00 PM
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Offline Dr. Acula

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2010, 11:29:44 AM »
O0
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 03:43:16 AM by Dr. Acula »

Offline Eliscu2

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2010, 11:34:27 AM »
:jamin:
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 12:30:37 AM by Eliscu2 »
WELCOME TO HELL!

Offline Eliscu2

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2010, 11:37:34 AM »
:karma:
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 12:29:33 AM by Eliscu2 »
WELCOME TO HELL!

Offline Octomommy

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2010, 11:48:14 AM »
Quote from: "Eliscu2"
Quote from: "Eliscu2"
Quote from: "Dr. Acula"
Quote from: "wdtony"
A PRESS CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD for the family of a fifteen year old African Canadian youth who was residing in a treatment facility for conduct disordered children in South Eastern Ontario.

The family retained Restoring Dignity to investigate the Nova Scotia Department of Community Services handling of their grandson'...s case. Thursday’s press conference will discuss the current developments on the case and the youth’s return to the province of Nova Scotia.

In attendance will be Mr. Roch Longueépée, Founder & CEO, Restoring Dignity, Dr. Charles Emmerys, with, Dawe, Bates, Parlee & Associates (NB), Mr. Richard Bureau with the firm Morris Bureau, and the Firm Walker Dunlop will also be working with Restoring Dignity in the family's fight to return him to the family home.

WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO ATTEND

Conference location: Westin Nova Scotia, Luneburg Room, Halifax, Nova Scotia, CanadaDate: Thursday August 26, 2010 Time: 12:00 PM
:suicide: EVIL JUST EVIL.......THERE ARE NO WORDS TO EXPRESS HOW EVIL THIS REALLY IS.
THIS IS THE WORK OF THE DEVIL....I KNOW IT.!!!!
ILLUMINATI HAVE DONE IT AGAIN IT JUST MAKES ME SICK! :on phone:  :on phone:  :on phone:  :on phone:
UUUUGHHHHH THIS IS EVIL JUST LIKE MARIJUANA AND FUN....JUST FUCKIN HARDCORE EVIL!!!
WHO THE HELL DO THOSE PUNKS THINK THEY ARE??? UGGGGH
THROW EM ALL IN THE MOSHPIT/TIMEMACHINE I SAY.
KILLEM ALL!
TESE PROGRAMS NEED A FUCKIN HOLY WAR.....
THIS IS WAY WORSE THAN DUBYA........
THOSE EVIL FUCKERS......OMG....SLAY THE GOVERNMENT....OY.....I'M FUCKIN MADDER THAN HELL FO SHO! :poison:  :clown:  :rasta:  ::unhappy::
:notworthy: Well what can I say that will top that?
These people mush be retarted faggots..... :roflmao:  O0  ::evil::
oh looky i have spellcheck dependency disorder syndrome disease....hmmmmm I refuse to give up my WINDOWS VISTA OR MY INTERNET EXPLORER...I WILL HAVE BAD SPELLING UNTIL I DIE!! :karma:  ::OMG::
:jamin: Well if I were Ziggy Marley (I am NOT) I would say you are a "CRAZY BITCH".......foshizzle!! Can I have another baby Because 8 is not enough and my Trailer park is full. :eek:
I feel like doing a re-make of Frank Zappa at this point....CATHOLIC GIRLS...
Maybe a "Watch out where the HUSKIES go and DON'T YO(P)U EAT THE SHITTY SNOW!!" SPICE IT UP A BIT! :soapbox:
AH FUCK NOW I HAVE A SPELLING DISORDER.....WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON AROUND HERE? :suicide:  :fuckoff:
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Offline Eliscu2

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nothing
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2010, 12:54:09 PM »
:seg2:
« Last Edit: November 17, 2011, 11:19:40 PM by Eliscu2 »
WELCOME TO HELL!

Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2010, 11:09:16 AM »
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1198901.html

Grandmother will fight for access

Institutionalized treatment of troubled kids isn’t safe, doesn’t work, advocates say

By JEFFREY SIMPSON Provincial Reporter
Fri, Aug 27 (2010) - 6:50 AM


The grandmother of a troubled Cole Harbour teenager who was returned to Nova Scotia this week after being treated for behavioural disorders at a facility in Ontario says she’ll fight for access to the boy.

"We feel very discouraged and hurt this has been done to us," the woman, who can’t be named to protect the 15-year-old boy’s identity, told a news conference Thursday.

"I feel he’s still not safe."

The woman and her husband learned Tuesday through a letter from the provincial Community Services Department that their contact with their grandson had been suspended on the recommendation of the Ontario facility. The department said family contact had become an obstacle to the boy’s treatment.

The grandmother is intending to take the battle to court with the help of a group of advocates that includes Independent MLA Trevor Zinck, self-described child-abuse survivor Roch Longueepee, lawyer Richard Bureau and New Brunswick psychologist Charles Emmrys.

The group says the type of institutionalized care Nova Scotia provides doesn’t work, and it is proposing an alternative style of foster care that would also involve the grandparents.

The grandparents received a second letter from Community Services on Tuesday telling them their grandson had been transferred to a facility in Truro.

The boy’s grandmother said she and her husband, who have been the child’s primary caregivers since he was a toddler, plan to meet with provincial representatives today to discuss the matter.

"I have a right to be frustrated because of what has been done to us. Our family has been destroyed. We love our grandson," she said.

The teenager has alleged he was abused at the Ontario facility. Ontario Provincial Police wrapped up their investigation of those claims last week, said Community Services spokesman Lucas Wide.

"No charges were laid against the staff or the facility," he said.

"We trust the findings."

Wide couldn’t comment on specific aspects of the case because they’re confidential.

A spokesman for the boy’s family expressed anger and frustration in not being informed about the results of the Ontario police investigation.

The boy has been in the care of the Nova Scotia government since November 2008 when it was determined he was a threat to himself and the community. He suffers from various cognitive problems, but his grandmother and the family’s lawyer say there has never been a conclusive diagnosis.

Nova Scotia does not have a facility capable of addressing the teen’s needs. The province’s Supreme Court ruled last year that he could be sent away because all local treatment options had been exhausted.

Wide pointed out that the plan the family advocates had failed to sway the judge: "The judge agreed with the plan presented by the Department of Community Services," Wide said.
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2010, 11:22:39 AM »
http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/local/a ... h-province

Family of teen to meet with province

Troubled youth was transferred back to Nova Scotia this week - Teen says he was abused in Ontario - Facility there now under investigation

ALEX BOUTILIER
METRO HALIFAX
Published: August 27, 2010 12:55 a.m.
Last modified: August 27, 2010 1:00 a.m.


The grandmother of a local teenager now being treated for behavioural difficulties in Truro says she doesn’t expect much from a meeting with the province on Friday.

The woman, who cannot be named to protect the 15-year-old’s identity, wants the province’s Department of Community Services to take the boy out of residential facilities and into a tailor-made foster care program.

She says without family contact, she doesn’t expect any rehabilitative treatment to be successful.

“Work with the child to come back home,” she said. “But work with the family. If you don’t work with the family, it won’t work.”

Community Services spokeswoman Vicki Wood could not speak to the specifics of the case, or confirm that communication between the family and the youth has been suspended.

She did say, however, that it is less common to suspend communication with older children in residential care than very young children.

The boy has been in provincial care since 2008, when it was determined he was a threat to himself and the community.

He was sent to Bayfield Homes, a residential facility in Ontario. The facility recommended suspending contact with the family.
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #25 on: August 31, 2010, 01:04:26 PM »
http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/canada/ ... nts--page0

Troubled N.S. boy to be sent to grandparents

THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published: August 30, 2010 6:39 p.m.
Last modified: August 30, 2010 6:43 p.m.

 

 HALIFAX - The grandparents of a deeply troubled boy say they are thrilled the Nova Scotia government has decided to release him into their care after fighting for more than a year to get him sent home from a treatment facility in Ontario.

"When (he) hugged me, he didn't want to let go," the woman said in an interview after a court hearing in Nova Scotia.

"I felt bad for that child. What he went through, he didn't deserve that."

The 15-year-old boy's grandparents say the department has confirmed he will be returning home by Sept. 28.

The boy has been under the care of the Community Services Department since November 2008. Under provincial legislation, neither the boy or the grandparents can be identified.

The woman said she wasn't allowed to talk to the boy on Monday because provincial officials entrusted with caring for him believe she has interfered with his treatment for a series of conduct disorders.

"They're making me out to be the culprit," she said, noting that she and the boy's grandfather had cared for him since he was a toddler. "I've just worked to get him out of that situation. ... Anyone who has a child they love would have done the same thing."

A spokesman for the Nova Scotia government said the Community Services Department couldn't comment on any details in the case.

In July, the grandparents alleged the boy had been beaten by staff at the Ontario facility.They accused two male staff members of throwing him to the floor, punching him in the ribs and kneeing him in the throat, leaving him badly scratched and bruised.

An advocacy group known as Restoring Dignity took on the family's cause and pushed for a police investigation.

A spokesman for the facility declined to comment on the case, citing privacy concerns.

On Monday, the Ontario Provincial Police confirmed it had wrapped up its probe and no charges would be laid.

The boy's grandmother says she was shocked by the Nova Scotia government's sudden decision to send her grandson home.

"God answered our prayers," she said. "I'm overwhelmed."

The province has long insisted that the boy couldn't stay in Nova Scotia because the province doesn't have the resources to help him.A residential facility that can provide long-term, intensive treatment is still under construction in the Truro area.

The youth's story attracted national attention last year when Nova Scotia Supreme Court endorsed a plan to have him sent to a facility in Utah. That plan fell through, but the boy was eventually sent to the facility in Ontario.

The boy's grandfather said he and his wife are willing to work with the Community Services Department.

"We want a definite plan," he said. "Something that's going to work for him, including education and recreation. If we don't work with them, it's not going to work."

He said he met Monday with the boy, who was transferred from Ontario to a facility in Nova Scotia last week.

Roch Longueepee, founder of Restoring Dignity, a non-profit group that seeks justice for victims of institutional child abuse, said a specialized family based treatment program could have been set up for the boy in Nova Scotia.

"The province is still in love with the idea of institutions," he said. "They are failing our children."
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2010, 01:06:31 PM »
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Front/9017704.html

Troubled teen goes back to grandparents' care

By The Canadian Press
Mon, Aug 30 (2010) - 6:18 PM


The grandparents of a boy with cognitive challenges say the Nova Scotia government has decided to release him into their care more than a year after he was sent to a treatment facility in Ontario.

Officials in Nova Scotia have declined to comment on the case, but they had said they didn't have the resources to care for the 15-year-old boy.

The grandparents have been fighting to have the boy returned to Nova Scotia alleging he had been abused by staff at the Ontario facility.

Earlier in the day, the Ontario Provincial Police confirmed they wouldn't be laying any charges after investigating the allegations.

Last week, the boy was transferred to a treatment facility in his home province, and the grandparents say the Department of Community Services has confirmed the boy will be returning home by Sept. 28.

His grandparents say they've agreed to work with the department to draft a plan of care for the boy, who has been in the care of the Nova Scotia government since November 2008.

Under provincial legislation, there is a publication ban on the boy's identity.
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2010, 01:10:02 PM »
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/st ... z0yCG0WQyT


No charges in N.S. boy's abuse claim: police

Last Updated: Monday, August 30, 2010 | 1:52 PM AT
CBC News


Ontario Provincial Police say they won't lay charges after an investigation into allegations that a Nova Scotia teenage boy was abused at a treatment facility.

Sgt. Kristine Rae confirmed Monday that an investigation was held but there were no grounds to lay charges.

The 15-year-old was being treated for behavioural disorders at the Bayfield treatment centre in Consecon, just south of Trenton in eastern Ontario last year. The boy's grand-parents said the teen told them he had been abused during his stay at Bayfield.

He was recently discharged and sent to a treatment facility in Nova Scotia.

The boy is in the permanent care of the Nova Scotia Department of Community Services. He suffers from mental disorders and has been in conflict with the law.

Last year, he was sent to the Bayfield facility because Nova Scotia doesn't have the kind of treatment program he needs.

He suffers from various cognitive challenges, but his grandmother and the family's lawyer say there has never been a conclusive diagnosis.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/st ... z0yCjS9Zmq
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Offline wdtony

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Re: Police probe abuse complaint
« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2010, 01:12:07 PM »
http://stephenkimber.com/2010/08/inquir ... t-end-well

Inquiry needed into children’s stories that don’t end well

by Stephen Kimber on August 30, 2010  

I’ve been writing about child protection issues since 2004 when I got interested in the story of a Halifax couple embroiled in a highly publicized, 67-hour, shots-fired standoff with police. The issue: Children’s Aid had seized their five-month old daughter, not because of anything the couple had done to the child—in fact, evidence indicated they were loving, capable parents—but because they’d each been accused of abducting children during acrimonious custody battles in previous relationships.

Their story didn’t end well. The parents ended up in jail. Their daughter disappeared into the often self-serving anonymity of the province’s foster care system.

Then there was the story of the 16-year-old girl whose mental health issues were never addressed in foster or group homes. She ended up in court. The frustrated judge ordered the then-minister of community services—the girl’s legal guardian—to explain the mess. The minister never testified. Instead, the case was shuffled to the sidelines.

I caught up with the girl—now 18—last year. She told me she didn’t get any more help after her court case; instead, as soon as she turned 18, she was spit out into the adult welfare system. Good riddens.

Through her, I met a young man who’d been shipped off at the age of 12—against his parents’ wishes—to an Ontario residential treatment centre called Bayfield where he spent five years. Bayfield, he says, didn’t help. Instead, they prescribed drugs: he was on 13 medications at one point. Like the girl, Bayfield and child welfare washed its hands of him as soon as it could. The last I heard, he was living on the streets.

Which brings us to the current case: the 15-year-old Cole Harbour boy who was also sent to Bayfield. He didn’t do well either. Bayfield has now dumped him, but not before squeezing his grandparents/guardians out of his life—leaving the province, which claims it doesn’t have the facilities to treat him, to decide what to do next with him.

Whatever it does with the boy, the province should do something else; call a public inquiry into how we deal with troubled children and families. Something is clearly wrong.
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