Author Topic: Lincoln's Melancholy  (Read 2782 times)

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Offline Anonymous

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Lincoln's Melancholy
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2005, 04:40:00 PM »
Drugs apparently aren't working for Paul.

He continues to possess multiple anon personalities.

http://www.fornits.com/wwf/viewtopic.ph ... 11&forum=9
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Lincoln's Melancholy
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2005, 04:52:00 PM »
Is it is so important to you to not stay
on topic and to shift the thread to
someone else who is not involved.

How about staying on topic, instead?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Lincoln's Melancholy
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2005, 05:45:00 PM »
Of course Anon wants to accuse another
Anon of being someone who was smashmouthed
by Deborah.

Once a dolt can't win a debate they revert
to dirty tactics.

In this case attacking the messenger, whether
or not, he is even the messenger.

It has worked here in the past, on many different threads and it works in politics.

It won't prove anything though, those that
need treatment for mental illness will hopefully
find it, without too much diversion from the naysayers.

The anti-psychiatry activists will continue their
ideologue regardless of the facts.

That is just the way it is ...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Anonymous

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Lincoln's Melancholy
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2005, 08:42:00 PM »
Culled from the article:

Paulina, born in Orange, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when she was 17. Her mother said she had been off medication for about two months when she drove to Mexico the night of Aug. 8.

Recently, Paulina told her mother she felt well enough to go off medication. She also said she was thinking of moving out and she and her boyfriend were talking marriage.

The young woman could become verbally abusive when off her medication. But Saucedo said her daughter never had shown violence toward herself or others.

Ensenada police said Paulina, fluent in Spanish, resisted arrest and showed "an aggressive attitude." They said the young woman, wearing a pink skirt and black top, appeared to be on drugs when they found her in the car on Avenida Ruiz between Fourth and Sixth streets.

...

For weeks, Saucedo had been urging Paulina to resume her medication because she was becoming increasingly disturbed.

A week before she drove to Ensenada, Saucedo took Paulina to an emergency room because she was showing signs of paranoia. She kept telling her mother about the need to keep doors locked and said someone was after her.

But Paulina refused medication at the ER, and later refused to see her doctor.

--------------------------------------------------

http://www.ocregister.com/ocr/2005/08/2 ... 651764.php

Saturday, August 27, 2005

Prosecutors in Ensenada investigate death in jail
Authorities skeptical of police reports that woman from Irvine committed suicide.

By GREG HARDESTY, GWENDOLYN DRISCOLL, MONICA RHOR and SALVADOR HERNANDEZ
The Orange County Register

IRVINE ? Alone in Ensenada late at night, without her car or purse or shoes, 20-year-old Paulina Baeza found an unlocked Chevy Blazer at a downtown car lot, climbed inside and fell asleep.

A few hours later, after police had arrested her for trespassing and locked her in a cell, Baeza was dead.

Contradicting initial reports from Ensenada police that Baeza - who suffered from bipolar disorder - committed suicide in her cell Aug. 9 by banging her head against the bars of the door, Mexican authorities said Friday that the Irvine woman may have died from improper use of force by police.

The Ensenada district attorney said suicide has been ruled out. Three Ensenada police officers face possible charges of negligent homicide and abuse of authority. Authorities said the investigation is continuing.

The abuse charge carries a maximum penalty of five to eight years; the homicide charge three to five years.

Baeza, a theater-loving student at Irvine Valley College and graduate of University High School, was in the main jail in Ensenada for 20 minutes when police reported her dead at 11:15 p.m., said Lorena Balco, spokeswoman for the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana.

A jail surveillance camera showed Baeza's head slamming on the ground and her body being dragged after officers apparently dropped her while carrying her down a hallway to her cell.

"We're keeping track of the case and following up with the Mexican authorities and waiting for a final statement that will be released early next week," Balco said.

Nine police officers - eight men, one woman - have been detained for questioning. Six are considered witnesses.

NO VENGEANCE

Baeza's parents are struggling to digest the details of their only child's death.

"After this, what could I possibly go through that could hurt me more?" said Baeza's mother, Carmen Saucedo. At the family's home in Turtle Rock, her daughter lived in a meticulously kept loft bedroom - her clothes and shoes organized by color.

Saucedo, 60, and her husband, Pablo Baeza, 57, buried Paulina on Aug. 14, two days after her body arrived from Mexico.

They said they want justice, not vengeance.

"I'm not into revenge or hurting people," Saucedo said. "That wouldn't do me any good. ... There are some things that can't be changed.''

Paulina, born in Orange, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when she was 17. Her mother said she had been off medication for about two months when she drove to Mexico the night of Aug. 8.

Recently, Paulina told her mother she felt well enough to go off medication. She also said she was thinking of moving out and she and her boyfriend were talking marriage.

The young woman could become verbally abusive when off her medication. But Saucedo said her daughter never had shown violence toward herself or others.

Ensenada police said Paulina, fluent in Spanish, resisted arrest and showed "an aggressive attitude." They said the young woman, wearing a pink skirt and black top, appeared to be on drugs when they found her in the car on Avenida Ruiz between Fourth and Sixth streets.

But there is no evidence of a struggle on the video taken when Paulina was at the police station, according to the district attorney.

QUESTIONS

What happened while she was in custody is not entirely clear, but at a news conference in Ensenada on Thursday, prosecutors showed reporters a computerized simulation of how, they say, officers carried Paulina by the feet and hands down a jailhouse hallway.

One officer held her by her handcuffed arms and two grasped her shackled feet.

Face down, Paulina twisted her head and body in an apparent attempt to look up. She then either slipped out of the officers' grips or was dropped.

The cause of death was "craniofacial trauma with fracture to the base of the skull," according to the District Attorney's Office.

A coroner's report prepared in Mexico and reviewed by Baeza's parents detailed other injuries indicating Paulina may have been beaten.

The report said there were hairline fractures on both of her forearms, bruises on her legs and arms, a broken front tooth, and several bruises and contusions on her face.

Paulina was the third person to die in the custody of Ensenada police in less than a year. A district attorney spokeswoman said two of those deaths were suicides.

Paulina, who grew up in Irvine but lived on and off with her grandmother in Durango, Mexico, between the ages of 5 and 8, had made three trips to Mexico by herself before her final one. Her parents said she usually visited friends in Rosarito.

GOODBYES

For weeks, Saucedo had been urging Paulina to resume her medication because she was becoming increasingly disturbed.

A week before she drove to Ensenada, Saucedo took Paulina to an emergency room because she was showing signs of paranoia. She kept telling her mother about the need to keep doors locked and said someone was after her.

But Paulina refused medication at the ER, and later refused to see her doctor.

Monday, Aug. 8, was the last time her parents saw her.

That evening, Saucedo, director of sales at a cosmetics company, recalled her daughter asking for the title of her gray 2001 Chevy Blazer. Puzzled but preoccupied with a business appointment at her house, Saucedo handed her the pink slip. She asked her mother for $20 before she left.

"OK, I'll see you later," Paulina said.

"God bless you, m'ija(my daughter)," her mother said.

Paulina drove away, never saying she was going to Mexico.

Her father called her on her cell phone around 8 p.m.

"I'm about to cross the border, Daddy," Paulina told him.

She then hung up because of a poor connection. That was the last time he spoke to her.

Around 6 a.m. the next morning, when Paulina was in Ensenada, the battery in her car died. She was ticketed for partially blocking a driveway, and her car was impounded.

Sometime around 1 p.m., witnesses told her parents that Paulina went to an Internet cafe and tried but failed to reach friends through e-mail. She left without taking her briefcase. Around 11 p.m., roughly the time police reported finding her dead in her jail cell, an Ensenada resident called Paulina's parents, saying he had found her purse on the street at about 7 or 8 p.m. Inside her purse was her driver's license, the parking ticket and about $60 in cash.

Alarmed, Saucedo and her husband drove to Ensenada, arriving at the police station at around 2 a.m.

Police told them their daughter was dead.

"I felt like I was suffocating," Saucedo said. "I went outside and just started running down the street."

Police wouldn't let them see her body.

Their daughter's body arrived Aug. 12. At the mortuary, two days before her funeral, Pablo Baeza gently lifted up Paulina's head.

"It felt loose, like her neck had been broken," he said.

Paulina's mother bathed her and applied makeup to her face. She dressed her in her favorite outfit: a pink skirt and a pink top.

In her room, Paulina kept a string of white lights around a vanity mirror - a tribute to her love of Broadway.

A ballet and flamenco dancer, Paulina acted in college productions, including lead roles in "Fiddler on the Roof" and "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat."

The 5-foot-4, 120-pound brunette with blond highlights idolized Lucille Ball.

"She loved being in the limelight - the center of attention," Saucedo said.

A large poster of life-affirming messages hung above Paulina's bed.

Said one: "Every day I count my lucky stars.''

Register news researcher Colleen Robledo contributed to this story. Hernandez reported from Ensenada; Hardesty, Driscoll and Rhor from Santa Ana.

CONTACT US: (714) 796-2286 or ghardesty@ocregister.com
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »